EurekAlert: Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction

EurekAlert: Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction . “Bad decision-making is a trait oftentimes associated with drug addicts and pathological gamblers, but what about people who excessively use social media? New research from Michigan State University shows a connection between social media use and impaired risky decision-making, which is commonly deficient in substance addiction.”

ScienceBlog: Using Vibration To Curb Digital Addiction

ScienceBlog: Using Vibration To Curb Digital Addiction. “In his research on college students’ productivity, Cornell Tech graduate student Fabian Okeke heard many accounts of time lost to social media, beginning with a click over to Facebook or YouTube for a quick distraction. But the distraction was not always so quick.”

Social media eating into pilots’ sleep: IAF chief BS Dhanoa (Times of India)

Times of India: Social media eating into pilots’ sleep: IAF chief BS Dhanoa . “Spending long hours on social media in the night is affecting the abilities of the pilots at the Indian Air Force (IAF), who are struggling to manage problems emanating from prolonged sleep deprivation.”

TechCrunch: A majority of U.S. teens are taking steps to limit smartphone and social media use

TechCrunch: A majority of U.S. teens are taking steps to limit smartphone and social media use . “It’s not just parents who are worrying about their children’s device usage. According to a new study released by Pew Research Center this week, U.S. teens are now taking steps to limit themselves from overuse of their phone and its addictive apps, like social media. A majority, 54% of teens, said they spend too much time on their phone, and nearly that many – 52% – said they are trying to limit their phone use in various ways.”

Recode: If you can quit social media, but don’t, then you’re part of the problem, Jaron Lanier says

Recode: If you can quit social media, but don’t, then you’re part of the problem, Jaron Lanier says. “On this week’s new episode of Too Embarrassed to Ask, Kara Swisher talks with Jaron Lanier, a VR pioneer and longtime technology critic who currently works at Microsoft Research. He’s the author of a new book, ’10 Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now’ and explains why those who have the opportunity to quit platforms like Facebook and Twitter should do so. He compares the problem to past crusades against ‘mass addictions’ like smoking or drunk driving, arguing that hearing more voices from people who are outside of the addiction may be the most helpful way to turn the tide.” The link includes a transcript, and don’t I have something to think about this weekend.

Neowin: Facebook is also working on a time management feature

Neowin: Facebook is also working on a time management feature. “This year’s trend in mobile software features seems to be focusing on helping users manage how much time they spend on their devices. After Google first talked about ‘digital wellbeing’ at its I/O conference back in May, Apple was quick to follow suit with the announcement of iOS 12 earlier this month. But, while those two companies are building the feature directly into their respective operating systems, Facebook seems to believe it can do a better job. It had already started working on a similar feature for the Instagram app shortly after Google I/O, and now it’s time for Facebook itself to receive a similar treatment.”

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged

Yellin Center: Pediatrician Screening for Social Media Use Urged. “In the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics, a team from the Baylor School of Medicine has proposed expanding the guidelines for adolescent health screenings to include questions about social media use. The proposal is based on data that finds teen social use resembles the patterns of substance addiction, with usage increasing over time from an average of 16 minutes a day between ages 10 and 12 to an average of 71 minutes a day during adolescence. Teenage girls report the highest usage, some 142 minutes per day on average. Anxiety during periods of withdrawal increase with age and usage, with 80 percent of college students indicating that they feel anxious when they are not able to access their devices, the authors report.”