CNET: Adobe online PDF tools tap into Google’s .new internet addresses

CNET: Adobe online PDF tools tap into Google’s .new internet addresses. “Since 2018, Google has let you type doc.new, slide.new and sheet.new into your browser address bar to fire up a blank document for G Suite’s Google Docs, Google Slides and Google Sheets. Now there’s a new option using the same approach from Adobe: PDF.new.”

ZDNet: Adobe wants users to uninstall Flash Player by the end of the year

ZDNet: Adobe wants users to uninstall Flash Player by the end of the year. “Adobe plans to prompt users and ask them to uninstall Flash Player from their computers by the end of the year when the software is scheduled to reach End-Of-Life (EOL), on December 31, 2020. The move was announced in a new Flash Player EOL support page that Adobe published earlier this month, six months before the EOL date.”

Popular Photography: Adobe offering free Creative Cloud tools for students impacted by Coronavirus through May 31

Popular Photography: Adobe offering free Creative Cloud tools for students impacted by Coronavirus through May 31. “Through May 31, higher-education and K-12 customers who currently use the Creative Cloud apps through computers in on-campus labs will be able to request temporary at-home access for no additional fee. The request will need to be made by an IT admin though. Details to make the changes can be found here. As educators and students transition to a long-distance learning experience Adobe is also offering a number of curated resources to help educators tailor their curriculum to an out-of-classroom experience.”

Krebs on Security: Microsoft Patch Tuesday, February 2020 Edition

Krebs on Security: Microsoft Patch Tuesday, February 2020 Edition. “Microsoft…released updates to plug nearly 100 security holes in various versions of its Windows operating system and related software, including a zero-day vulnerability in Internet Explorer (IE) that is actively being exploited. Also, Adobe has issued a bevy of security updates for its various products, including Flash Player and Adobe Reader/Acrobat.”

Photoshop detector: Adobe demos tool that identifies picture editing (CNET)

CNET: Photoshop detector: Adobe demos tool that identifies picture editing. “…About Face uses machine learning to determine if a face in a photo has been manipulated in Photoshop. It looks at the pixels of a photo and offers the probably from 0% to 100% of whether the image has been altered. It can also tell you what parts of the face were changed and undo those changes to reveal the original, un-Photoshopped image.”

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes. “Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times are tired of seeing fake media propagate, and they’re teaming up to do something about it. The trio has launched a Content Authenticity Initiative that aims to create a standard for digital media attribution. Ideally, you’d know whether or not a picture or video is legitimate simply by examining the file — you’d know if it had been manipulated.”

The Register: Time to check who left their database open and leaked 7.5m customer records: Hi there, Adobe Creative Cloud!

The Register: Time to check who left their database open and leaked 7.5m customer records: Hi there, Adobe Creative Cloud!. “Adobe has pulled offline a public-facing poorly secured Elasticsearch database containing information on 7.5 million Creative Cloud customers. The cloud-based silo was uncovered by infosec detective Bob Diachenko, who reported it to Adobe last week.”

BetaNews: Adobe issues patches to fix scores of bugs in Adobe Acrobat and Reader, plus other software

BetaNews: Adobe issues patches to fix scores of bugs in Adobe Acrobat and Reader, plus other software. “There has been a lot of scrutiny on patches issued by Microsoft recently, but now Adobe is vying for attention by releasing patches for a slew of programs, fixing literally dozens of bugs.”

Make Tech Easier: Why Are Browsers Ending Flash Support and How to Access Flash Content Afterwards

Make Tech Easier: Why Are Browsers Ending Flash Support and How to Access Flash Content Afterwards. “Major browsers have been slowly pulling support for years now, and Adobe itself has announced that it would be stopping development and support in December 2020. This means that within the next year, pretty much no mainstream browsers will be able to access Flash content on the Web. No videos, no games, no vintage Flash sites, nothing. So why exactly is this happening, what’s the timeline, and what do you do if you really need to access some kind of flash content later?”

CBR: Adobe Gets Serious about Data Science, Pulls Two Tools out of Beta Mode

CBR: Adobe Gets Serious about Data Science, Pulls Two Tools out of Beta Mode. “You might associate Adobe with creative software suites, but the company’s bid to help business users deliver the kind of personalised marketing most brands now crave, is leading it ever deeper into the data science realm – with the company today making two tools generally available that were first teased in a beta release late last year.”

CNET: Adobe AI can spot facial manipulations in Photoshop

CNET: Adobe AI can spot facial manipulations in Photoshop. “In a world filled with manipulated photos, deepfakes and even totally fake human faces, Adobe says it’s working on an artificial intelligence tool to spot fake images. Citing ‘the ethical implications’ of Photoshop, Adobe partnered with researchers from the University of California at Berkeley to work on the issue.”

ZDNet: Adobe sends out second fix for critical Reader data leak vulnerability

ZDNet: Adobe sends out second fix for critical Reader data leak vulnerability. “Adobe has released a second patch to resolve a critical zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Reader after its original fix failed. The vulnerability, CVE-2019-7089, was patched in Adobe’s February 12 patch release. Buried among 42 other critical bugs, the security flaw was described as a sensitive data leak problem which can lead to information disclosure when exploited.”

CBR: Seven Out of Every Ten Open Vulnerabilities Belong to Just Three Vendors

CBR: Seven Out of Every Ten Open Vulnerabilities Belong to Just Three Vendors. “Seven out of every ten open vulnerabilities observed by customers belongs to just three vendors, Oracle, Microsoft and Adobe. These are the findings of cyber security enterprise Kenna Security in their new report Prioritization to Prediction, which explores how enterprises are dealing with open vulnerabilities.”