Vice: I Tried to Adopt a Traumatized Sims 4 Baby From Instagram

Vice: I Tried to Adopt a Traumatized Sims 4 Baby From Instagram. “Sims like these are lovingly created and then put up for adoption by Simmers on Instagram, which they more commonly refer to Simstagram. Most Simmers use Instagram for roleplay, given that it’s a social media platform focused mainly on still images. They pretend their Sims run the Instagrams themselves, posting as if they were influencers. Storylines run the gamut from pregnant runaway teens to more generic family drama, and just like real influencers, these Sims grow up, get married, and eventually have kids or adopt them.”

Mashable: TikTok helps adoptees find a new community to explore joy, family, and belonging

Mashable: TikTok helps adoptees find a new community to explore joy, family, and belonging. “Adoptee TikTok, a collective of TikTokers sharing their adoption stories, is reaching monumental numbers. The hashtag #Adoption itself has 2.8 billion views. More niche hashtags like #AdoptionJourney, which has 170 million views and focuses on the voices of adoptive parents, and #AdopteesofTikTok at 57.4 million views, tell individual stories of adoption and everything that accompanies the process.”

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption. “Helped by an adoptive mom with strong tech skills, [Andrea] Kelley invested countless hours and $3,000 to launch BF-EAC [Beteseb Felega-Ethiopian Adoption Connection] in 2014. Since then, the organization – registered with the Ethiopian government as a nonprofit – has reconnected more than 200 adoptees with their Ethiopian relatives. More than 1,000 other cases remain active in the registry, with adoptees or their birth relatives seeking connections.”

Un-Adopted: YouTubers Myka and James Stauffer shared every step of their parenting journey. Except the last. (The Cut)

The Cut: Un-Adopted: YouTubers Myka and James Stauffer shared every step of their parenting journey. Except the last.. “According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, anywhere from one percent to 5 percent of the more than 100,000 adoptions in the U.S. each year are legally terminated in what’s called a ‘dissolution’ — making the Stauffers’ decision to relinquish custody rare but not unheard of. Had they not shared Huxley’s adoption with the world, building an audience from videos about everything from his medical diagnoses to his food anxiety, they would be dealing with a private family tragedy rather than a public scandal. Instead, the Stauffers have been held up as examples of what is wrong with both influencer and adoption culture — and what can happen when a child is caught at the intersection.”

Chronicle of Social Change: Child Trends Introduces New Tool in Comparable Child Welfare Data

Chronicle of Social Change: Child Trends Introduces New Tool in Comparable Child Welfare Data. “Child Trends has released a new tool that offers browsers a robust collection of data around child maltreatment, foster care, kinship caregivers and adoption for all 50 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. The figures are drawn from the most recent Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) report, the U.S. Census Bureau and other sources. All the information is pegged to national trendlines for comparison purposes.”

In Development: Database for Adopted Vietnamese Children

In development: a database for adopted Vietnamese children. “Minister of Justice Ha Hung Cuong has approved a project to support Vietnamese children adopted by foreigners in searching for their origins and visiting their native places….Another part of the project is to computerise information about adopted Vietnamese persons and their origins. A digital database is expected to make it easier to search for information.”