Digiday: With an influencer advisory board, Clorox is changing up its YouTube advertising strategy

Digiday: With an influencer advisory board, Clorox is changing up its YouTube advertising strategy. “The Clorox Company is building an influencer advisory council. The company is aiming to use the council, which will be comprised of hundreds of influencers, to help it better understand the type of content that will resonate with such individuals and their audiences. The consumer goods company also wants to fashion a more collaborative content-creation arrangement between these influencers and its organization.”

CNET: Facebook abandons plan to sell ads in WhatsApp, report says

CNET: Facebook abandons plan to sell ads in WhatsApp, report says. “Facebook has reportedly abandoned its plan to sell ads in messaging platform WhatsApp, according to a Thursday report by The Wall Street Journal. The company’s decision to bring ads to the app is reportedly what led to the departure of WhatsApp’s creators around two years ago.”

BuzzMachine: In defense of targeting

BuzzMachine: In defense of targeting. “In defending targeting, I am not defending Facebook, I am attacking mass media and what its business model has done to democracy — including on Facebook. With targeting, a small business, a new candidate, a nascent movement can efficiently and inexpensively reach people who would be interested in their messages so they may transact or assemble and act.”

Charity Digital News: Museum to unveil online historical archiving project

Charity Digital News: Museum to unveil online historical archiving project. “The British Motor Museum is to launch an online project showcasing ‘the art of selling’ vehicles following a £30,000 funding award. Available online will be a collection of sales and press material from British Leyland and other vehicle makers on how cars have been historically marketed.”

Slate: We Need to Fix Online Advertising. All of It.

Slate: We Need to Fix Online Advertising. All of It.. “There is so much more “political” advertising than just what comes from official campaigns or speaks explicitly about legislative issues. Nearly anyone can afford to advertise, from deep-pocketed political action groups to grassroots activists to individuals. These ads need not name a candidate or party or legislative issue to have political impact. Anyone willing to pay to say ‘Black lives matter? Don’t all lives matter!?’ is engaged in political advertising. For just a few dollars, they can enjoy the immense reach of social media and their precision tools for microtargeting users by demographics, location, preferences, or political persuasion. Political advertising, not just on social media but across the internet, has become a searing problem for American democracy.”

Consumer Reports: Digital Billboards Are Tracking You. And They Really, Really Want You to See Their Ads.

Consumer Reports: Digital Billboards Are Tracking You. And They Really, Really Want You to See Their Ads.. “On a bright Friday morning, Frank O’Brien is giving me a tour through Times Square in New York City. Thousands of strangers are milling around us on the sidewalk, and in the crowd, it’s easy to feel anonymous. But according to O’Brien, many of the billboards and screens towering over our heads in every direction know a lot about who we are.”

CNN: Democrats blast Google’s new rules for political ads

CNN: Democrats blast Google’s new rules for political ads. “Three major Democratic committees blasted Google on Friday for an ad policy that will allow politicians to run false ads across its platforms, including YouTube, in the run-up to the 2020 election. The Democrats also took aim at Twitter, without actually naming it, for banning all ads from politicians.”