Brigham Young University: Curious about Utah’s frontier women? Browse BYU’s new database of women’s newspaper ads

Brigham Young University: Curious about Utah’s frontier women? Browse BYU’s new database of women’s newspaper ads . “A single bottle of tonic to cure diabetes, cancer, ulcers and dizziness. Raisins and currants for Christmas mince meat pies. Midwifery courses taught by a certified female doctor, $30 a term. A souvenir stone from the Hill Cumorah, ‘guaranteed genuine,’ mailed from New York for 25 cents. This list represents just a sampling of the goods and services advertised to Utah frontier women in the Woman’s Exponent, the preeminent woman’s newspaper published in Salt Lake City from 1872 to 1914 to share local and general news, household tips and educational materials.”

British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers

British Library: Help trace the stories of enslaved people in the Caribbean using colonial newspapers . “We are excited to launch a new crowdsourcing project that explores the links between slavery and newspapers in late 18th and early 19th century Barbados: Agents of Enslavement: Colonial newspapers in the Caribbean and hidden genealogies of the enslaved. This project will examine the extent to which newspapers facilitated and challenged the practice of slavery. It will also help to reveal the identities, networks, and acts of resistance of enslaved people hidden within these printed texts.”

Nevada Today: University Libraries celebrate Artown 2021

Nevada Today: University Libraries celebrate Artown 2021. “Many of Nevada’s iconic neon signs are fading away. Which is why the University Libraries at the University of Nevada, Reno created Neon in Nevada. Neon in Nevada is a collaborative project documenting and preserving images of neon signs from across the state in a digital archive. In partnering with UNLV Libraries, the Nevada Historical Society, rural Nevada towns, and others, this project is truly a state-wide effort. It is vital in keeping the familiar glow of neon and its history in Nevada alive. The digital archive will go live in August 2021, and the public will be able to view and interact with photos of neon signs in Nevada like never before.”

New York Times: The Curious Case of the Quirky Mortgage Ads Boosting Biden Online

New York Times: The Curious Case of the Quirky Mortgage Ads Boosting Biden Online. “Lower My Bills is a part of Rocket Companies, a Detroit-based mortgage company whose brands include Quicken Loans. Lower My Bills pulls in new customers and vacuums up the contact information of people seeking reduced mortgages. Not every ad from Lower My Bills touted Mr. Biden in recent months, but a review of Facebook’s archive of recent ads shows that a vast majority have done so — and in mostly glowing terms.”

Tech Policy Press: Facebook, Google political ad bans not effective, researchers say

Tech Policy Press: Facebook, Google political ad bans not effective, researchers say. “Two researchers at the Duke University Center on Science and Technology Policy conclude that bans on political advertising put in place by the tech platforms just before and in the period after the November 2020 U.S. elections were not necessarily effective, and had a number of negative side effects.”

From corporate America to conspiracy theory promotion: How a Minnesota man made a career out of anonymously amplifying dark plots (Washington Post)

Washington Post: From corporate America to conspiracy theory promotion: How a Minnesota man made a career out of anonymously amplifying dark plots. “Sean G. Turnbull displays many of the hallmarks of a successful upper-middle-class family man, a former film producer and marketing manager for one of the country’s largest retail corporations who lives in a well-appointed home in this Minneapolis-St. Paul suburb. Former colleagues describe him as smart, affable and family-oriented. But for more than a decade, the 53-year-old has also pursued a less conventional path: anonymously promoting conspiracy theories about dark forces in American politics on websites and social media accounts in a business he runs out of his home. His audience numbers are respectable and his ad base is resilient, according to corporate records and interviews.”

Politico: Trump’s fundraising arm is back advertising on Facebook

Politico: Trump’s fundraising arm is back advertising on Facebook. “Former president Donald Trump’s fundraising arm is once again advertising on Facebook after the social media giant banned the ex-president from using the site. Starting late last week, Save America Joint Fundraising Committee, a joint venture between Trump’s Save America leadership PAC and his Make America Great Again PAC, has spent $3,506 on Facebook ads promoting Trump’s upcoming rally outside Cleveland, Ohio and calling for donations to his fund.”

CNN: Newsmax portrays Facebook as an enemy of conservatives. Behind the scenes, it’s spending millions on Facebook ads

CNN: Newsmax portrays Facebook as an enemy of conservatives. Behind the scenes, it’s spending millions on Facebook ads. “In the last 90 days, Newsmax has purchased approximately $1.5 million in ads from Facebook, according to records available publicly on the social media company’s website. And since 2018, the right-wing network has spent a total of $3.7 million with Facebook. The staggering amount in advertising spent over the last 90 days has gone toward more than 2,300 Facebook advertisements — many of which promote the very hosts who describe the platform in diabolical terms.”

MakeUseOf: How to Get Rid of Annoying Instagram Ads

MakeUseOf: How to Get Rid of Annoying Instagram Ads. “Since Instagram introduced advertisements and a non-chronological feed, there’s no shortage of paid posts on users’ feeds. Nowadays, scrolling through your feed feels like driving past multiple billboards on a highway or watching cable TV. So if you’re tired of scrolling past annoying ads on Instagram, read on. This article will give you detailed step-by-step guides on how to reduce and remove Instagram ads.”

Chrome Unboxed: If You Want To Opt-out Of Google’s Controversial New FLoC Tracking, Here’s How

Chrome Unboxed: If You Want To Opt-out Of Google’s Controversial New FLOC Tracking, Here’s How. “Google’s controversial, new tracking method called the Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) is going live for some users in the United States, Canada, India, Japan, the Philippines, New Zealand, Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, and Australia as a part of the company’s new Privacy Sandbox initiative. In the process, third-party cookies are becoming a thing of the past, and with that, many questions have come up regarding Google’s ability to have special, sole access and domination over user data.”