Wired: Facebook Claims It Has a Better Way to Prove Ads Work on Facebook

Wired: Facebook Claims It Has a Better Way to Prove Ads Work on Facebook. “Facebook’s first-ever State of the (Measurement) Union event in New York City today is meant to mollify marketers still worried about issues with transparency. The plan? Convince them that metrics don’t matter at all.”

Washington Post: Google now knows when its users go to the store and buy stuff

Washington Post: Google now knows when its users go to the store and buy stuff. “Google will begin using data from billions of credit and debit card transactions — including card numbers, purchase amounts and time stamps — to solve the advertising juggernaut’s long-standing quest to prove that online ads prompt consumers to make purchases in brick-and-mortar stores, the company said on Tuesday.”

Advertising Age: A ‘Contrite’ Facebook Refunds Advertisers, Who Still Want Oversight

Advertising Age: A ‘Contrite’ Facebook Refunds Advertisers, Who Still Want Oversight. “It wasn’t much of a refund. But in this case it might be the thought that counts. Facebook is cutting checks to advertisers after it found a flaw in the way it measures certain video. It’s the first time Facebook has been public about a problem measuring ads that involved billing since it started disclosing such reporting errors last year. Previously the discrepancies affected unpaid posts.” OVER and OVER and OVER…

Recode: Twitter has a list of things it thinks you’re interested in — here’s how to see it

Recode: Twitter has a list of things it thinks you’re interested in — here’s how to see it. “…Wednesday’s update also included something else that we found interesting, and possibly even hilarious: You can now see what ‘interests’ Twitter thinks you have, and that it uses to decide which ads and content to show you in your timeline.” And demographic guesses. Twitter thinks I’m over 65. Guess again!

Columbia Journalism Review: The Facebook rescue that wasn’t

Columbia Journalism Review: The Facebook rescue that wasn’t. “IF YOU GO TO THE HOMEPAGE of the Watershed Post, the online news source for the Catskill region of upstate New York, there are plenty of stories about rural regeneration: agritourism and a new creamery, the ongoing political wrangling over the development of the Belleayre ski resort, property ads where prices are significantly up from a few years ago. But one part of the region’s fortunes is not reviving: the Watershed Post itself.”