Mashable: Instagram let a marketing company scrape users’ location data because of course it did

Mashable: Instagram let a marketing company scrape users’ location data because of course it did. “Speaking at the 2019 F8 developers’ conference, Mark Zuckerberg assured the gathered crowd that ‘the future is private.’ Apparently, he forgot to pass that message along to Facebook-owned Instagram. “

The Verge: Check out this incredible archive of Apple’s promotional photos and ads

The Verge: Check out this incredible archive of Apple’s promotional photos and ads. “Graphic designer and marketer Sam Henri Gold has assembled an incredible archive of Apple’s promotional materials that stretches back to the 1970s, which he’s uploaded into a Google Drive folder for people to look through. The folder contains hundreds of videos and pictures of the company’s products, and it’s well worth the time to take a trip down memory lane.”

WTVD: FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products

WTVD: FDA forces some social media influencers to add warnings to posts after they advertise unsafe vape, e-liquid products. “Some popular social media accounts are posting new warnings after a federal crackdown. The Federal Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration are targeting accounts that promote and market vape and e-liquid products.”

Everybody’s Library Questions: Copyright and advertisements (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Everybody’s Library Questions: Copyright and advertisements. “My previous post answered a reader question about how to determine whether a newspaper (or other serial issue) was under copyright or not. (More details about the process can be found in our guide ‘Determining copyright status of serial issues’.) Some people still wonder about the ads, though.”

Ars Technica: 30,000 followers makes you an Internet “celebrity,” says UK ad regulator

Ars Technica: 30,000 followers makes you an Internet “celebrity,” says UK ad regulator. “One of the stranger questions of our modern era: when does being “Internet famous” translate into being, well, actually famous? According to a UK regulator, the magic number is 30,000 followers.”

AdAge: A History Of Brands Hacking Wikipedia

AdAge: A History Of Brands Hacking Wikipedia. “Since Wikipedia launched in 2001, multiple brands and agencies have manipulated the site’s open format, which allows anyone to edit articles, for their own marketing gain. Among brands previously called out are Burger King, SeaWorld and NBC News.” I had no idea this was such a thing.