CNET: Facebook apologizes for showing baby product ads to woman who lost her child

CNET: Facebook apologizes for showing baby product ads to woman who lost her child. “Facebook has apologized after a British woman who lost her child continued to see baby product ads after changing her advertising preference on the site. Anna England-Kerr found that her feed ‘was filled with ads for baby things’ despite using the social media site to share the news that her daughter had been stillborn and changing her settings to avoid such advertising, she wrote in an open letter to the company.”

Popular Mechanics: Facebook Admits Its New Gadget Might Use Your Data for Ads After All

Popular Mechanics: Facebook Admits Its New Gadget Might Use Your Data for Ads After All. “The debut of Portal, Facebook’s video chatting device, sparked an obvious question: Does this camera-enabled home assistant manufactured by a company attached to numerous privacy scandals keep your private data private? Facebook was quick to note that Portal wouldn’t feed your data to advertisers — ‘Portal conversations stay between you and the people you’re calling,’ last week’s announcement said — but that reassurance has already proven false: Facebook might use your calls and Portal app usage as queues for its advertising network, a company spokesperson told Recode.”

Phys .org: Facebook requires UK political ad buyers to reveal identity

Phys .org: Facebook requires UK political ad buyers to reveal identity. “Facebook says anyone who takes out a British political ad on the social media platform will now be forced to reveal their identity, in a bid to increase transparency and curb misinformation. The company said Tuesday that it will also require disclaimers for any British political advertisements, which will be archived for seven years in a publicly accessible database.”

PR Newswire: Google, Facebook, and Twitter Release Data on Political Ads (More or Less) (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Google, Facebook, and Twitter Release Data on Political Ads (More or Less) (PRESS RELEASE). “Using cutting-edge machine learning and data scraping tools, computer scientists at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering today released the first database and analysis of political advertising based on more than 884,000 ads identified by Google, Twitter, and Facebook. The team launched their user-friendly Online Political Ads Transparency Project in July with data from Facebook, which was the first company to provide it. But the researchers were forced to switch techniques when Facebook blocked their data collection two weeks later. Today’s report is the first to include not only Facebook (including Instagram), but data newly shared by Twitter and Google.”

Search Engine Land: Bing votes ‘no’ on political candidate and ballot measure ads

Search Engine Land: Bing votes ‘no’ on political candidate and ballot measure ads. “Bing’s decision to block U.S. political candidate and ballot measure ads impacts any U.S. candidate or political organization as they will not be able to run advertising campaigns on the country’s second most popular search engine. ‘The regulatory environment for political candidate and ballot measure advertising is likely to continue to evolve rapidly in the coming months, making it complex to adhere with precision,’ wrote Microsoft’s VP of global partner service for advertising sales, Kya Sainsbury-Carter, on the Bing Search blog.”

Adweek: New Database for Uncovering Female Talent in the Ad Industry Targets Junior, Mid-Level Creatives

Adweek: New Database for Uncovering Female Talent in the Ad Industry Targets Junior, Mid-Level Creatives. “A new global database aimed at unveiling female talent in the ad industry hopes to finally raise the amount of women holding creative director positions—which today remains at just around 11 percent. The site, called inVisible Creatives, is claiming to do something its predecessors, including Where Are the Boss Ladies?, didn’t: spotlight junior, mid-level and senior talent, with a particular emphasis on their work.”