Sapiens: Spy Plane Photos Open Windows Into Ancient Worlds

Sapiens: Spy Plane Photos Open Windows Into Ancient Worlds . “The U.S. government declassified many U-2 images in 1997, making them freely available to researchers and the public. But they remained unindexed and unscanned. There was no way to access the images digitally, nor could people know where geographically each roll of film was taken or highlight the particularly interesting frames. In the past four years, my archaeologist colleague Jason Ur at Harvard University and I (a landscape archaeologist) have worked to make this complex photo archive accessible to other researchers and to illustrate its importance for history and anthropology. The result is a resource that we hope many scholars can take advantage of, a window into ancient sites as well as historical Middle Eastern communities as they existed more than half a century ago.”

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth. “Earth View is a collection of thousands of the planet’s most beautiful landscapes, seen from space…. Today, we’re making our biggest update to Earth View by adding more than 1,000 new images to the collection, bringing the total to more than 2,500 striking landscapes.”

Layers of London: the latest (British Library)

British Library: Layers of London: the latest. “Layers of London, a website home to more than 200 georeferenced maps of London and 1000s of crowdsourced histories, have now launched the latest pillar of their mission, the Layermaker, where anyone can log in to try their hand at georeferencing one (or one thousand) of these aerial images of London. Using the same platform as the British Library’s georeferencer, the user friendly tool makes it simple for anyone to contribute to this project.”

University of Maine: James W. Sewall Co. donates approximately 1 million aerial images to Raymond H. Fogler Library

University of Maine: James W. Sewall Co. donates approximately 1 million aerial images to Raymond H. Fogler Library. “Raymond H. Fogler Library at the University of Maine has received a donation of over 3,000 rolls of film containing about 1 million aerial images from the James W. Sewall Co. in Old Town, Maine. The collection contains original aerial photography of Maine and New England captured by Sewall over the span of 65 years. The archive will offer researchers and the public a vast collection that details changes to Maine’s landscapes and cities over the past century.”

Government Technology: Subscription Service Offers Government High-Res Aerial Pics

Government Technology: Subscription Service Offers Government High-Res Aerial Pics. “At a time when short-range drones and satellite birds-eye views are commonplace, one Colorado-based company, Vexcel Imaging, is putting its proprietary cameras on airplanes to capture ultra-high-resolution data of the United States for sale by subscription to state and local governments.”

Bing Blog: We’ve Released New Bird’s Eye Imagery!

Bing Blogs: We’ve Released New Bird’s Eye Imagery! . “Bing Maps was one of the first mapping services on the web to offer oblique 45-degree angle aerial imagery, also known as Bird’s Eye. Bing Maps is still as committed as ever to offering fresh high-resolution satellite and aerial imagery. Over the last 12 months we’ve been busy releasing refreshed and expanded Bird’s Eye imagery and we want to make sure our customers and users are aware of the progress we’ve been making. In this effort, we’re excited to say we’ve released approximately 102,000 square kilometers of new Bird’s Eye imagery spanning 100+ cities in the United States over the last several months with more to come.”

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past. “During the 1950s and 1960s, US spy planes made regular flights across Europe, Central Asia, and the Middle East, photographing the terrain to track military targets. A chunk of the Middle Eastern photographs were declassified in 1997, and now those airborne images are helping archaeologists track changing features in the landscape that in many cases are no longer visible today, according to a new paper published in Advances in Archaeological Practice.”