Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.

Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.. “In the early hours of Nov. 4, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed shut down telecommunications and deployed troops to his country’s northern Tigray region. Shortly after, a flurry of new Twitter accounts appeared and began to tweet about the situation. By the following week, new accounts were responsible for nearly a quarter of tweets about the crisis.”

BBC: British Museum to help dig for Nigerian treasures

BBC: British Museum to help dig for Nigerian treasures. “The British Museum has announced plans to help ‘investigate the history of the Kingdom of Benin’, with a grand archaeology mission and new museum. The organisation will work with Nigerian teams on the creation of a new Edo Museum of West African Art (EMOWAA) and accompanying archaeology project.”

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa. “Through social media platforms, the #EndSARS activists not only managed to call thousands of Nigerians to action and hold Nigerian authorities to account, but also garnered unprecedented international attention and support for their cause. The fact that a burgeoning human rights movement has been contemplated, created and sustained online did not go unnoticed in the overwhelmingly conservative halls of power in Nigeria. Shaken to the core by this new media phenomenon and its astounding proclivity to galvanise a traditionally silenced and disregarded youthful majority, some Nigerian state governors and public officials started to demand that social media be regulated.”

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa. “The Observatory of Central African Forests (OFAC), which was created over a decade ago to address that challenge, has now launched an analysis portal that keeps track of policies and trends to examine their impact on forest ecosystems at the regional, national and local levels. The objective of the digital platform is to provide a single-entry point through which researchers and decision-makers can access information on the subject and follow emerging trends.”

Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening . “The use of social media in global crime-fighting is extensive. Common uses include the identification of criminals, evidence sources and submission of distress reports. Police departments around the world are still exploring expansive uses of social media to support crime investigation and prevention. Despite its obvious advantages, social media involvement in combating crime also poses pitfalls. Law enforcement officers might inadvertently disclose personal information, sensitive operational materials and policing tactics. Also, information released by the police through social media can be misinterpreted by the public.”

ReliefWeb: Better data, better schools, better education

ReliefWeb: Better data, better schools, better education. “Together with the Congolese government, Cordaid is building an open-source database of more than 60.000 schools in the Democratic Republic of Congo. ‘This data-driven innovation allows to improve the country’s educational system more efficiently’, says Cordaid’s data management advisor Julie Oliene. Girls are probably the first to benefit.”

The Conversation: Nigeria needs innovation and science investment to help control COVID-19

The Conversation: Nigeria needs innovation and science investment to help control COVID-19. “To control this pandemic and prevent a future one, Nigeria needs to start investing heavily in science research. Nigeria was one of the 10 African heads of state and government that endorsed a target to allocate 1% of gross domestic product to research and development in 2002. But progress towards this target has been slow.”

Joy Online: Hacklab foundation to create an open database for Ghanaian developers

Joy Online: Hacklab foundation to create an open database for Ghanaian developers. “With about a dozen hubs spurring innovation and growth in tech, the developer and tech community in Ghana continues to grow steadily. It has become prudent to map out the ecosystem and understand what gaps and opportunities exist.”

Mashujaa: Celebrate the communities of Kenya with Google Arts & Culture (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Mashujaa: Celebrate the communities of Kenya with Google Arts & Culture. “Originally launched in 2019, Utamaduni Wetu: Meet the People of Kenya is Google’s most ambitious digitization project to date in Africa, and one of the first digital content features on the subject of Kenyan communities. Everyone can now explore over 10,600 high-resolution photographs, 170 expert-curated exhibits, 80 Street Views of 16 sites and learn more about the intangible heritage and stories of the country’s 44 communities officially registered by the government.”

Associated Press: Activist fined for dislodging African art from Paris museum

Associated Press: Activist fined for dislodging African art from Paris museum. “A Congolese activist was fined 2,000 euros ($2,320) on Wednesday for trying to take a 19th-century African funeral pole from a Paris museum in a protest against colonial-era injustice that he streamed online.”

Voice of America: Tiny African Nation of Lesotho Proposes Social Media Limits

Voice of America: Tiny African Nation of Lesotho Proposes Social Media Limits. “The set of regulations, introduced for debate by lawmakers this week, would require all social media users with more than 100 followers to register as ‘internet broadcasters’ — a move that would, in turn, require them to abide by the same rules that govern broadcast media houses. It would also allow regulators to investigate social media users’ posts and even order them to remove them.”

PR Newswire: USAID, Born Free USA, and Freeland Launch WildScan App to Counter Wildlife Trafficking in West Africa (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: USAID, Born Free USA, and Freeland Launch WildScan App to Counter Wildlife Trafficking in West Africa (PRESS RELEASE). “Designed as a tool for customs and border patrol officers, WildScan aids in the identification of wildlife species and wildlife parts and products being trafficked across borders. The app comes with a comprehensive photo library and database of vital information on more than 500 protected species, providing users with tips on how to identify the animals they encounter. WildScan also details local animal protection laws and includes a reporting option that allows the user to document a suspected wildlife crime with the push of one button. This reporting transmits information to relevant enforcement agencies and contributes to broader information sharing on wildlife crime in the region.”

COVID-19 vaccines: how to ensure Africa has access (Nature)

Nature: COVID-19 vaccines: how to ensure Africa has access. “Last month, a grand experiment was launched. Its aim? To speed up the development of COVID‑19 vaccines and make sure they are distributed equitably among higher- and lower-income countries. This welcome endeavour is called the COVID-19 Vaccine Global Access (COVAX) initiative. It is co-led by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. As of 1 October, 167 countries have signed up, covering nearly two-thirds of the global population. More have expressed interest, according to Gavi.”

Washington Post: Africa has defied the covid-19 nightmare scenarios. We shouldn’t be surprised.

Washington Post: Africa has defied the covid-19 nightmare scenarios. We shouldn’t be surprised.. “News reports and opinion articles have posited that corruption and a lack of health-care infrastructure meant that Africa was a ‘time bomb’ waiting to explode. Rampant poverty and a lack of effective governance would cause the dark continent to fall apart under the weight of a public health emergency. The world, the experts said, should prepare to offer aid, loans and debt forgiveness to African governments — in other words, they should prepare to save Africa. No need.”

Coronavirus: WHO sets rules for testing African herbal remedies (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: WHO sets rules for testing African herbal remedies. “The World Health Organization (WHO) has agreed rules for the testing of African herbal remedies to fight Covid-19. Sound science would be the sole basis for safe and effective traditional therapies to be adopted, it said. Any traditional remedies that are judged effective could be fast-tracked for large-scale manufacturing.”