NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too

NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too. “To read Nation articles more than seven days old — like this report that thousands of students have failed to turn up at schools after their nine-month closure due to Covid-19 or a viral column asking ‘Who is the banana republic now?’ following the U.S. Capitol riot — users will have to pay up. Subscriptions start at 50Ksh for one week, 150Ksh for one month, or 750Ksh for one year. (50Ksh is about 45 cents USD.)”

Digitisation in Asian and African Collections 2019 to 2021: what’s new online and where to find it (British Library)

British Library: Digitisation in Asian and African Collections 2019 to 2021: what’s new online and where to find it. “In the past year and a half we’ve made over 650 items from the Library’s Asian and African collections newly available online. To make it easier for you to find and explore our wonderful collections, we’ve put together a list of recently digitised items with links to their online versions for you to download here… They are arranged by collection area/project, so you can easily search and filter to your heart’s content!”

ProPublica: A Once-in-a-Lifetime Chance for Liberian Immigrants Has Been “Hamstrung” by COVID — and Trump’s Dysfunctional Immigration Bureaucracy

ProPublica: A Once-in-a-Lifetime Chance for Liberian Immigrants Has Been “Hamstrung” by COVID — and Trump’s Dysfunctional Immigration Bureaucracy. “When the Liberian legalization program was enacted, it was an unexpected success for immigrants under the Trump administration. It was the first legalization bill to pass Congress since 2000, and was signed into law by a president famously hawkish on immigrants in general and African immigrants in particular. It was supposed to be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for as many as 10,000 Liberian immigrants, many of whom have been in the U.S. for decades. But it’s become a victim of two colliding trends: the COVID-19 pandemic (and the economic crisis it engendered), and severely degraded functioning at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the agency responsible for legal immigration.”

Getty Blog: Rethinking Descriptions of Black Africans in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art

Getty Blog: Rethinking Descriptions of Black Africans in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. “Museums have much work to do. The Black Lives Matter movement’s call for social reform extends to arts institutions, bringing focus to the need for inclusivity and equity. The ways in which we present and describe artworks in our care are central to these efforts. In the Getty Museum’s Antiquities department, we have turned our attention to artifacts that depict—or have been thought to depict—Black Africans. Recognizing that many of our descriptions and titles for these objects were inadequate, we are undertaking a review of our online collection and the terms that we use. We recently completed a first batch of updates, and offer here some insights into issues that we faced.”

Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.

Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.. “In the early hours of Nov. 4, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed shut down telecommunications and deployed troops to his country’s northern Tigray region. Shortly after, a flurry of new Twitter accounts appeared and began to tweet about the situation. By the following week, new accounts were responsible for nearly a quarter of tweets about the crisis.”

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa. “Through social media platforms, the #EndSARS activists not only managed to call thousands of Nigerians to action and hold Nigerian authorities to account, but also garnered unprecedented international attention and support for their cause. The fact that a burgeoning human rights movement has been contemplated, created and sustained online did not go unnoticed in the overwhelmingly conservative halls of power in Nigeria. Shaken to the core by this new media phenomenon and its astounding proclivity to galvanise a traditionally silenced and disregarded youthful majority, some Nigerian state governors and public officials started to demand that social media be regulated.”

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa

Forests News: New portal tracks policies and trends impacting forests in Central Africa. “The Observatory of Central African Forests (OFAC), which was created over a decade ago to address that challenge, has now launched an analysis portal that keeps track of policies and trends to examine their impact on forest ecosystems at the regional, national and local levels. The objective of the digital platform is to provide a single-entry point through which researchers and decision-makers can access information on the subject and follow emerging trends.”

Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening . “The use of social media in global crime-fighting is extensive. Common uses include the identification of criminals, evidence sources and submission of distress reports. Police departments around the world are still exploring expansive uses of social media to support crime investigation and prevention. Despite its obvious advantages, social media involvement in combating crime also poses pitfalls. Law enforcement officers might inadvertently disclose personal information, sensitive operational materials and policing tactics. Also, information released by the police through social media can be misinterpreted by the public.”

ReliefWeb: Better data, better schools, better education

ReliefWeb: Better data, better schools, better education. “Together with the Congolese government, Cordaid is building an open-source database of more than 60.000 schools in the Democratic Republic of Congo. ‘This data-driven innovation allows to improve the country’s educational system more efficiently’, says Cordaid’s data management advisor Julie Oliene. Girls are probably the first to benefit.”