Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt: A People’s History Through Photographs and Stories (The Elephant)

The Elephant: Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt: A People’s History Through Photographs and Stories. “Over the past few weeks, I’ve been inviting people to share photos of their mothers, grandmothers and aunties looking stylish in the fashion of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. The idea, which we are calling ‘Our Grandmother’s Miniskirt’, is simple enough, crowdsource photographs from Kenyan homes of women dressed in the style of that era; the photographs will be accompanied by reflections, essays, short stories or poems. The aim is to capture a history of ordinary people and to share this history through physical exhibitions, an online archived exhibition, and a coffee table book.”

iAfrikan: Meet the ‘varakashi’ – Zimbabwe’s online army

iAfrikan: Meet the ‘varakashi’ – Zimbabwe’s online army. “The avatar might be a cockerel, a razor or, most likely, a beautiful Eastern European or Latino woman. Behind the avatar, there might be a human, a bot or some combination of the two. With Zimbabwe’s ‘varakashi’ it is hard to be sure of much. Their job, at least, is clear cut: disrupt online debates and stymie criticism of President Emerson Mnangagwa and his government.”

Bournemouth University: The importance of preservation and sustainability of digital data in the arts

Bournemouth University: The importance of preservation and sustainability of digital data in the arts. “The AHRC research project, ArtoP: The Visual Articulations of Politics in Nigeria sets out to collect and archive visual material that is produced by artists, animators, filmmakers, photographers in Nigeria around and following the elections in February 2019.”

TimesLive: Zulu maidens march against Google censorship of ‘bare breasts’ at annual reed dance

TimesLive (South Africa): Zulu maidens march against Google censorship of ‘bare breasts’ at annual reed dance. “Cultural activist Nomagugu Ngobese, who is in charge of the group of about 50 maidens, said that western societies, and Google, needed to respect how they showed pride in their culture.”

Boston University: ASC Completes Research Project on Mandinka Archives

Boston University: ASC Completes Research Project on Mandinka Archives. “The African Studies Center, an affiliated center of the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University, have completed a project with Mugar Library focusing on the archives of Mandinka scholars of Casamance, Senegal…. The team digitized a little over 18,000 pages of Arabic, Arabic-Ajami bilingual texts, and Mandinka Ajami materials covering a variety of religious and non-religious subjects. This reprsents the largest digital collection of Mande scholars’ work in the world, which will help scholars and students of Africa around the world enhance their teaching and research on various aspects of Africa.”

IOL: Fresh hope for African big cat populations – database

IOL: Fresh hope for African big cat populations – database. “‘These records provide some hope that lion populations are beginning to establish and increase in areas where hope was lost,’ said Samantha Page-Nicholson, the co-ordinator of the African Lion Database, a platform to consolidate critical data on the iconic species. It was launched in October by the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) under the auspices of the Cat Specialist Group of the IUCN’s Species Survival Commission.”

Nieman Lab: Social media is distorting the representation of women in Africa. Here’s what can be done about it

Nieman Lab: Social media is distorting the representation of women in Africa. Here’s what can be done about it. “I conducted research into feminist ethics in the age of new media in Africa. I found that little has changed. The new media continues in the ways of the old conventional media — that is, it supports patriarchy and negative portrayal of women. Women still don’t have any agency in the way the mass media represents them. They become images of old, fixed ideas about femininity and masculinity. They serve dominant ideas about capitalism and consumerism. The media environment continues to keep women down.”