Quartz: Uganda’s social media tax has led to a drop in internet and mobile money users

Quartz: Uganda’s social media tax has led to a drop in internet and mobile money users. “Uganda’s social media tax has proved to be detrimental to both its internet and mobile money sectors. In the three months following the introduction of the levy in July 2018, there was a noted decline in the number of internet users, total revenues collected, as well as mobile money transactions. In a series of tweets, the Uganda Communications Commission noted internet subscription declined by more than 2.5 million users, while the sum of taxpayers from over-the-top (OTT) media services decreased by more than 1.2 million users.”

The New Times: Social media trolls, influencers set for a fight in Nigeria’s elections

The New Times: Social media trolls, influencers set for a fight in Nigeria’s elections. “As Nigeria’s Feb 16 presidential election approaches, tensions are ramping up across the country and like elsewhere around the world social media has become one of the most fraught battlegrounds. Online, candidates and their respective political parties are engaging individuals, usually young men and some women, who have been creating fake accounts daily to direct conversations, promote agenda, expose the shortcomings of opponents, and test the ground for Election Day when unofficial results will be emerging on social media.”

New Delhi Times: Zimbabwe Activists Push Back on Social Media Restrictions

New Delhi Times: Zimbabwe Activists Push Back on Social Media Restrictions. “In Zimbabwe, rights and opposition groups are surviving by using social media to communicate with the masses as state-owned media remain reserved for ruling party officials. During recent anti-government protests, the public received information through social media and now the government wants a law to block such platforms.”

CNN: Social media access restored in Zimbabwe by court order

CNN: Social media access restored in Zimbabwe by court order. “Access to social media platforms in Zimbabwe was reinstated on Monday, hours after a court deemed the government’s internet shutdown illegal. Zimbabwean authorities clamped down on internet use last week, after violent protests broke out over President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s announcement of a 150% hike on fuel prices.”

BBC: Zimbabwe cuts internet indefinitely amid violent crackdown

BBC: Zimbabwe cuts internet indefinitely amid violent crackdown. “Zimbabwe has shut down the internet indefinitely amid an intensifying crackdown on protests against a hike in fuel prices. The country’s largest mobile operator – Econet – says it has been ordered to cut services until further notice.”

Citizen: African leaders wake up to the potency of social media in politics

Citizen: African leaders wake up to the potency of social media in politics. “When South Africa’s former president Jacob Zuma, a proud traditionalist, joined Twitter recently, it was a vivid signal that politicians on the continent are slowly but surely waking up to the power of social media in modern-day political discourse. The response has been mixed.”