The Rogersville Review: ETSU’s Archives of Appalachia digitizes Black history collection

The Rogersville Review: ETSU’s Archives of Appalachia digitizes Black history collection. “Given to the university more than 20 years ago, the Langston Heritage Group Collection includes a wealth of historical information about Black churches, schools, civic clubs and organizations throughout Washington County from the end of the Civil War to the present. Thanks to archivists at East Tennessee State University, the collection has been digitized and made available online to anyone interested in this history.”

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Milwaukee’s historical Bronzeville lives on at a new website and app dedicated to preserving its stories

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Milwaukee’s historical Bronzeville lives on at a new website and app dedicated to preserving its stories. “Telling the stories of Milwaukee’s African American families and businesses in a new way is the goal of a project just launched by [Patricia] Diggs and Kitonga Alexander, a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. ‘Milwaukee Bronzeville Histories’ is a website and mobile app that will allow people to learn about the past — and the present — as they walk the northside neighborhood. It went live in time for Bronzeville Week, which begins Saturday.”

Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront

New-to-Me, from Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront. “The African Letters Project is a free database that consists of over 5,600 letters written between 1945 to 1994, during the decolonization era in many African countries. [Professor Elisabeth] McMahon’s initial idea for the database was to highlight more African American activists who supported independence movements throughout Africa during that period of history.”

National Geographic: Rising seas threaten the Gullah Geechee culture. Here’s how they’re fighting back.

National Geographic: Rising seas threaten the Gullah Geechee culture. Here’s how they’re fighting back.. “Latitude, topography, and proximity to the Atlantic Ocean make the stretch of coastline from Jacksonville, North Carolina, to Jacksonville, Florida—called the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor— particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, storm frequency and intensity, higher temperatures, and a warmer, more acidic ocean.”

Ford Foundation: Ford, Mellon and MacArthur Foundations Transfer Sole Ownership of Historic Ebony and Jet Photo Archive to Getty and NMAAHC

Ford Foundation: Ford, Mellon and MacArthur Foundations Transfer Sole Ownership of Historic Ebony and Jet Photo Archive to Getty and NMAAHC . “A consortium comprising the Ford Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Trust, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution, announced today the official transfer of ownership of the acclaimed Johnson Publishing Company (JPC) archive to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and to the Getty Research Institute, a program of the Getty Trust.”

Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies Online Exhibit Opens (University of Nebraska Omaha)

University of Nebraska Omaha: Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies Online Exhibit Opens. “‘Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies (1971-2021)’ digital exhibit is now available online through the UNO Libraries’ website. The exhibit shares the history of one of the oldest Black Studies departments in the nation, highlighting the complex relationship between university administrators, students, and the Omaha Black community.”

Globe Newswire: Getty Images Launches Initiative to Elevate Black History and Empower Storytellers (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Getty Images Launches Initiative to Elevate Black History and Empower Storytellers (PRESS RELEASE). “Getty Images, a preeminent global visual content creator and marketplace, today launched the Black History & Culture Collection (BHCC), an initiative created to provide free non-commercial access to historical and cultural images of the African/Black Diaspora in the US and UK from the 19th century to present day.”

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok . “The Gullah Geechee people make up one of the oldest and most extraordinary communities in the United States. But if you’ve never heard of them, it might be because their history is often sifted out of textbooks, and the longevity of their culture is now in danger. This distinctly African American community began on the eastern coastal islands — spanning from Florida all the way up to North Carolina in the 1600s. Slaves, mostly from West Africa, lived in complete isolation from the continental United States, separated by rivers, swamps and waterways that weren’t easy to cross.”

Arizona State University: ASU alumna creates resource to find Black-owned galleries

New-to-me, from Arizona State University: ASU alumna creates resource to find Black-owned galleries. “In February 2021, [April Hobby] founded The Black Curation, a website that focuses on highlighting Black-owned art galleries and art experiences. Specifically, she created a map and directory of Black-owned art galleries worldwide. Hobby sourced these galleries through researching online publications and receiving feedback from artists, gallery owners, art collectors and art enthusiasts.”

University of Michigan: U-M Black student database through 1970 is now public

University of Michigan: U-M Black student database through 1970 is now public. “A new public database of African American students created by the University of Michigan documents students who attended U-M between 1853 and as recently as 1970. A comprehensive compilation of this nature did not previously exist at the university and remains very rare for universities across the country. In the process, hundreds of compelling stories have been uncovered surrounding segregated housing, relocation after slavery and ‘segregation scholarships,’ which originated in the 1920s.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will launch the digital exhibition ‘Ancestors Know Who We Are’ June 15. The exhibition features works by six contemporary Black-Indigenous women artists that address issues of race, gender, multiracial identity and intergenerational knowledge.”

LitHub: How Empirical Databases Have Changed Our Understanding of Early American Slavery

LitHub: How Empirical Databases Have Changed Our Understanding of Early American Slavery. “In historical scholarship during the early 21st century, some of these new methods and tools of truth-seeking have been put to work on a large scale in the history of slavery and race in America. Among the most important and useful of these tools are the careful construction of empirical databases. Increasingly, this work has been done by teams of scholars, who combine traditional sources with digital methods on a new scale.”

ProPublica: She Warned the Grain Elevator Would Disrupt Sacred Black History. They Deleted Her Findings.

ProPublica: She Warned the Grain Elevator Would Disrupt Sacred Black History. They Deleted Her Findings.. “Experts in the field of cultural resource management say that companies sometimes look away from findings or are asked to change them to make their developer bosses happy. The field is now dominated by for-profit firms like Gulf South that developers hire to comply with the federal law. As a result, these firms can operate not as preservation gatekeepers but as lock-pickers for private industry intent on development.”

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing. “[Cree] Myles first partnered with Penguin Random House last year, when she organized a read-a-thon called Black Like We Never Left featuring works by Toni Morrison. The late, heralded, Pulitzer and Nobel-prize winning author was published by Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House. A few months later Penguin Random House offered Myles a job curating an Instagram platform centered on Black books.”