Wilton House Museum: Black Craftspeople Across the Virginia Landscape

Wilton House Museum: Black Craftspeople Across the Virginia Landscape. “The Black Craftspeople Digital Archive seeks to enhance what we know about Black craftspeople by telling both a spatial story and a historically informed story that highlights the lives of Black craftspeople and the objects they produced. This fall, the BCDA will launch the Virginia portion of the archive and map. Together, we will dive into the lives of these Virginians, learn their stories, and understand how they shaped the landscape and material culture of the state.” October 21.

Variety: Solange’s Saint Heron Unveils Free Library of Rare Books and Art by Black Creators

Variety: Solange’s Saint Heron Unveils Free Library of Rare Books and Art by Black Creators. “Solange’s Saint Heron studio and platform has announced the launch of its free library of ‘esteemed and valuable’ books by Black creators for research, study and exploration. Each reader will be invited to borrow a book of their choice for 45 days, completely free of charge. It is available via Saint Heron’s website, saintheron.com starting Monday, Oct. 18 — further details on taking out the books is below.”

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature. “It’s the latest extension of [Professor Maryemma] Graham’s [History of Black Writing] project, which she brought with her from the University of Mississippi to Northeastern University and then to KU in 1999. The first stage was to identify and save physical copies of books by Black writers from destruction. The next was to digitize them. And now the organizers are creating tools that will allow both academic researchers and the general public to look at the entire corpus of Black fiction, which HBW has been collecting for nearly 40 years, by using keywords, themes, data visualizations and in other ways that [Drew] Davidson termed ‘metadata.’.”

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts. “The grant, which was issued in July, will support the digitization of the AFRO’s full photo archive, help build new tools to increase access to an exhaustive database of images and support the creation of an artificial intelligence informed online research interface…. The AFRO’s full photo collection, spanning more than a century of media coverage that told stories from a unique Black perspective, includes approximately 3 million photographs, [Savannah] Wood highlighted, also estimating that the Afro Charities’ digitization project will take somewhere from five to 10 years.”

Bay State Banner: Black, queer and part of Boston’s history

Bay State Banner: Black, queer and part of Boston’s history. “Inspired by the racial reckonings of 2020, The History Project, New England’s largest archives of LGBTQ materials, is working to flesh out its collection related to Black queer history. Funded by a Mass Humanities Digital Capacity Grant and spearheaded by Community Curator Fellow Micha Broadnax and Community Connector slandie prinston, Documenting Black Queer Boston will provide physical and digital records for the community to experience and build on.”

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers. “Connecticut is the first state in the nation to mandate that all of its high schools offer an elective class on Black and Latinx history. These classes must be taught by the fall of 2022, but many high schools have added them to the curriculum this year. Alan Marcus, a professor of curriculum and instruction in UConn’s Neag School of Education, has led a team that developed a website to assist high school teachers with the instruction of this course.” I took a quick look and didn’t see anything that was state-specific.

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement. “In 2017–2019, the landmark traveling exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, shone a light on Black artists from the early 60s to the early 80s. A new expansive book conceived as a companion to this exhibition compiles hundreds of important texts from the era reflecting on the influence and power of Black art…. On September 9, the book’s editors, Mark Godfrey and Allie Biswas, will join Getty curator LeRonn P. Brooks for an online discussion about this cultural dialogue. They will explore the powerful ideas put forth by artists and writers who confronted questions of Black identity, activism, art, and social responsibility during the Black Power era.” Free and virtual (Zoom)

Black Film Archive: Introducing BlackFilmArchive .com

Black Film Archive: Introducing BlackFilmArchive.com. “For the past year, I’ve spent most of my time pondering one question: What does it mean to make Black film history accessible? Today, I’m proud to launch Black Film Archive, an evolving project that serves as my current response to this expansive question. In its first iteration, Black Film Archive lists every* Black film made between 1915 and 1979 currently streaming with every description written by yours truly. This free platform and open resource has been created with you all in mind. There are over 200 films for you to discover… right now!”

Black Enterprise: A Museum Celebrating Black Joy Brings A Healing And Powerful Perspective Of The Black Experience

Black Enterprise: A Museum Celebrating Black Joy Brings A Healing And Powerful Perspective Of The Black Experience. “The digital Museum of Black Joy is open in Philadelphia. It is an affirming exhibit by curator and creator Andrea Walls. The 57-year-old is a Pushcart Prize-nominated poet. She began studying photography in 2018 and launched what’s called the ‘borderless exhibition’ on the first day of January 2020. She noticed stories involving Blackness were often about struggles and violence rather than jubilation.”

The Well UNC: Carolina Performing Arts announces ‘Southern Futures’

The Well UNC: Carolina Performing Arts announces ‘Southern Futures’. “Southern Futures at CPA will produce new works, collaborations and research on social justice, racial equity and the American South. The organization has named Grammy and MacArthur Award-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens to a three-year research residency at the core of the initiative, beginning in spring 2022. Giddens will focus on discovering and sharing cultural artifacts and local histories that challenge entrenched narratives and monolithic thinking on topics central to Southern Futures, a collaborative initiative of the College of Arts & Sciences, University Libraries, Carolina Performing Arts and The Center for the Study of the American South.”

DigitalNC: Issues from 1951 of the Carolina Times are now on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Issues from 1951 of the Carolina Times are now on DigitalNC. “Thanks to funding from an IDEA grant from UNC Libraries, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center is pleased to now have the full run of 1951 issues of the Carolina Times digitized. The issues from 1951 were never microfilmed, so they were not included in previous projects to digitize the newspaper which were done from film.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West

Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West. “The L.J. West Collection includes 286 objects from the 1840s to about 1925 in three groupings: works by early African American daguerreotypists James P. Ball, Glenalvin Goodridge and Augustus Washington; early photographs of diverse portrait subjects and objects related to abolitionists, the Underground Railroad and the role of women entrepreneurs in it; and photographic jewelry that represents the bridge between miniature painting and early cased photography such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes.”

DCist: A New Photo Collection Adds Nearly 2,000 Images To The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive

DCist: A New Photo Collection Adds Nearly 2,000 Images To The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive. “The D.C. Public Library’s Go-Go Archive is a digital and physical resource full of books, magazines, records, cassette tapes, DVDs, and 10,000 tweets about the Don’t Mute DC movement. But since it was established in 2012, the collection has suffered from an acute lack of photos capturing the culture surrounding the music — and even the bands that produced it.That’s changing this week, as the D.C. Public Library is adding nearly 2,000 photos that portray a decade of performances and behind-the-scenes moments shared by legendary go-go musicians and fans alike.” Seeing this new resource immediately reminded me of

Smithsonian Launches “Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past” With a Virtual Forum (BusinessWire) (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Smithsonian Launches “Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past” With a Virtual Forum (PRESS RELEASE). “The Smithsonian will kick off its new race initiative, ‘Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past,’ with a virtual forum Aug. 26. The initiative will bring together resources from across the Smithsonian to explore how Americans understand, experience and confront racism through several critical lenses like wellness, wealth and the arts. ‘Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past’ will include virtual and live events across the country as well as digital content, storytelling and learning resources for students and educators.”

Her Take: Talking With North Carolina Hip-Hop Blogger Nancia Odom (Indy Week)

Indy Week: Her Take: Talking With North Carolina Hip-Hop Blogger Nancia Odom. “It has now been a year since this hip-hop column debuted. I have enjoyed every minute of my experience documenting hip-hop in the Triangle area, but I am not the first to do so…. Highpoint native Nancia Odom, a registered nurse by trade who now leads teams in support of clinical software, launched [her blog] in 2008. The blog made her one of the first people to document hip-hop in North Carolina, and the site is still active.”