PopSugar: Lyft Is Offering Discounted Rides to Black History Museums and Black-Owned Businesses All Month

PopSugar: Lyft Is Offering Discounted Rides to Black History Museums and Black-Owned Businesses All Month. “Lyft is joining the Black History Month celebrations by offering free or discounted rides to locations that embody black excellence. This promo works on one ride, up to $10, to black history museums, memorials, and cultural sites and black-owned businesses in participating cities around the US.” Alas, my city is not participating, but there’s a pretty good list of US cities (and a couple of Canadian) that are participating.

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work. “As of this fall, Professor of American Studies Peter Rutkoff and Professor Emeritus of History Will Scott have published their extensive research on the Gullah culture. The project, which has developed over the course of two decades, is now publicly available via the Digital Kenyon archive. Gullah refers to a language, a people and a culture dating back to the middle of the 17th century. Today, only 6,000 Gullah speakers remain, most of whom live on St. Helena Island off the coast of South Carolina.” I can’t find the URL for the archive in the article – I may have missed it – anyway let me tell you it’s at https://digital.kenyon.edu/gullah/ .

OutSmart: New Houston Black LGBTQ Archive to Launch on Feb. 21

OutSmart: New Houston Black LGBTQ Archive to Launch on Feb. 21. “[Harrison] Guy asked the staff at Houston’s African American Library at the Gregory School about starting a black LGBTQ archive in Houston. What emerged from those early discussions is “The Black LGBTQ Houston History & Heritage Project—Charles Law Community Archive at the African American Library at the Gregory School” (or simply the Charles Law Community Archive). The archive will include activist papers, artifacts, and oral histories. “

Black Twitter 101: What Is It? Where Did It Originate? Where Is It Headed? (UVA Today)

UVA Today: Black Twitter 101: What Is It? Where Did It Originate? Where Is It Headed?. “Meredith Clark was scrolling through her Twitter feed recently when she came across a tweet that made her think back to her childhood in Lexington, Kentucky, and smile. The tweet linked to a video of an African-American woman waving her hands through a running faucet with the caption, ‘This makes the water heat up faster.’ In that instant, Clark, an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Virginia, felt connected to a group of African-American Twitter users – none of whom she knew personally – who were in the midst of a discussion about the video. “

Pew: Surging Interest in Black History Gives a Lift to Museums, Tourism

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Surging Interest in Black History Gives a Lift to Museums, Tourism. “Black history museums and historic sites are flourishing across the South, riding a wave of interest in African-American history that has made a stunning success of the two-year-old National Museum of African American History and Culture in the nation’s capital.”

Dazed: This exhibition spotlights the next gen artists exploring fashion and race

New-to-me, from Dazed: This exhibition spotlights the next gen artists exploring fashion and race. “Kimberly M. Jenkins, a fashion educator and independent researcher, began developing an academic initiative. It began with the course ‘Fashion and Race’, which she has taught at the New School’s Parsons School of Design since Autumn 2016. ‘The first thing we do in the class is to go about discussing what race, systemic oppression, and white privilege are to set up the terms we will be relying upon in order to look at how the construction of race has shaped fashion and beauty industries,’ Jenkins explains. Driven to bring her vision to the public, Jenkins created The Fashion and Race Database Project, an online archive filled with vital source materials.”

Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims (Charleston Chronicle)

Charleston Chronicle: Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims. “The oft-overlooked experiences of the Lowcountry’s African Muslims are the subject of a new digital exhibit now freely available online. The exhibit—formally styled Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry—documents more than three centuries of West African Muslims, from those forcibly brought to the Americas before the War of Independence to adherents of Islam in the Lowcountry today.”