University of Oregon: New collection helps preserve the legacy of a civil rights trailblazer

University of Oregon: New collection helps preserve the legacy of a civil rights trailblazer. “Thanks to an anonymous UO Libraries donor, the legacy of African-American journalism in Oregon — and knowledge of an important civil rights pioneer — is becoming more accessible than ever. The generous gift is funding digitization of six new titles that will diversify the perspectives represented in the library’s Historic Oregon Newspapers online resource. Debuting in February 2019, The Advocate is the first of the papers to come online, with issues dating from October 1924 to December 1933 now available.”

New York Times: There’s No Afro Emoji. These Women Want to Change That.

New York Times: There’s No Afro Emoji. These Women Want to Change That.. “Many people connected to the African diaspora have Afros. And like anyone else, they send emojis to their friends — a zombie, say, or a mermaid or a genie. But which emoji can they use to represent themselves?”

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore. “In Nov. 1966, the first issue of ‘Chicory,’ written by everyday residents of Baltimore City, was published. Publishing original poetry with little to no editing, the magazine grew as a space for young people of color in the poorest neighborhoods of the city to express themselves. Working as a ‘vehicle for civic dialogue’ and fostering a community environment among the Black ghetto, ‘Chicory’ was for who [Mary] Rizzo described as ‘people who don’t necessarily like to write, but who have something to say.'”

Exclusive: Giphy Releases A Collection Of GIFS Designed By Black Artists (Refinery29)

Refinery29: Exclusive: Giphy Releases A Collection Of GIFS Designed By Black Artists. “For their latest collaboration, GIPHY has teamed up with Refinery29 Unbothered, Refinery29’s Instagram account and initiative for Black women and femme empowerment. The project collaborated with seven Black femme illustrators and animators to create designed GIFs depicting Black culture. The goal? To inspire mainstream media companies to have more diversity in their visuals and Black creators to keep creating.”

CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month

CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month. “Google wants you to learn more about how black culture has shaped American history. Google Earth has made an interactive map in honor of Black History Month in collaboration with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. The journey shines light on how black history has shaped the American experience in areas like advocacy, business, film, TV, education and technology.”

PopSugar: Lyft Is Offering Discounted Rides to Black History Museums and Black-Owned Businesses All Month

PopSugar: Lyft Is Offering Discounted Rides to Black History Museums and Black-Owned Businesses All Month. “Lyft is joining the Black History Month celebrations by offering free or discounted rides to locations that embody black excellence. This promo works on one ride, up to $10, to black history museums, memorials, and cultural sites and black-owned businesses in participating cities around the US.” Alas, my city is not participating, but there’s a pretty good list of US cities (and a couple of Canadian) that are participating.

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work

The Kenyon Collegian: Digital archive features Gullah culture work. “As of this fall, Professor of American Studies Peter Rutkoff and Professor Emeritus of History Will Scott have published their extensive research on the Gullah culture. The project, which has developed over the course of two decades, is now publicly available via the Digital Kenyon archive. Gullah refers to a language, a people and a culture dating back to the middle of the 17th century. Today, only 6,000 Gullah speakers remain, most of whom live on St. Helena Island off the coast of South Carolina.” I can’t find the URL for the archive in the article – I may have missed it – anyway let me tell you it’s at https://digital.kenyon.edu/gullah/ .