WSPA: 50,000 names added to the Slave Deeds of Buncombe Co. Project

WSPA: 50,000 names added to the Slave Deeds of Buncombe Co. Project. “Buncombe County’s Register of Deeds has added 50,000 names to the Slave Deeds of Buncombe County Project research database. Buncombe Co. officials said this was possible because of a partnership with UNC Greensboro and a $294,000 grant. The database shows the deeds of slaves in 13 counties of N.C. from 1776 through 1865 and it is meant to help African Americans learn more about their past.”

Wilton House Museum: Black Craftspeople Across the Virginia Landscape

Wilton House Museum: Black Craftspeople Across the Virginia Landscape. “The Black Craftspeople Digital Archive seeks to enhance what we know about Black craftspeople by telling both a spatial story and a historically informed story that highlights the lives of Black craftspeople and the objects they produced. This fall, the BCDA will launch the Virginia portion of the archive and map. Together, we will dive into the lives of these Virginians, learn their stories, and understand how they shaped the landscape and material culture of the state.” October 21.

WECT: Grave of 1898 victim discovered, funeral planned 123 years later

WECT: Grave of 1898 victim discovered, funeral planned 123 years later. “It’s been 123 years since the infamous 1898 Wilmington Massacre and the first grave of one of the Black people killed during that tragic day has been discovered. Joshua Halsey is buried in an unmarked grave in Pine Forest Cemetery off Rankin Street. Members of a non-profit research group called Third Party Project were able to locate his grave after handwritten maps in the Pine Forest registry were digitized.”

Variety: Solange’s Saint Heron Unveils Free Library of Rare Books and Art by Black Creators

Variety: Solange’s Saint Heron Unveils Free Library of Rare Books and Art by Black Creators. “Solange’s Saint Heron studio and platform has announced the launch of its free library of ‘esteemed and valuable’ books by Black creators for research, study and exploration. Each reader will be invited to borrow a book of their choice for 45 days, completely free of charge. It is available via Saint Heron’s website, saintheron.com starting Monday, Oct. 18 — further details on taking out the books is below.”

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records. “In August, Ancestry released what it says is the most extensive and searchable Freedmen’s Bureau records by making available more than 3.5 million documents from the National Archives and Records Administration. Some records date back to 1846. And more than a month since the release, researchers like [Regina] Vaughn are discovering things on Ancestry they say would’ve taken them years, or things they would have never found. The site includes details such as labor contracts, bank records, marriage licenses, schools, and food and clothing for emancipated Black Americans.”

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature

University of Kansas: Grant Will Give Public Better Access To History Of Black Literature. “It’s the latest extension of [Professor Maryemma] Graham’s [History of Black Writing] project, which she brought with her from the University of Mississippi to Northeastern University and then to KU in 1999. The first stage was to identify and save physical copies of books by Black writers from destruction. The next was to digitize them. And now the organizers are creating tools that will allow both academic researchers and the general public to look at the entire corpus of Black fiction, which HBW has been collecting for nearly 40 years, by using keywords, themes, data visualizations and in other ways that [Drew] Davidson termed ‘metadata.’.”

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts

The AFRO: Afro Charities receives $535K grant to fund archive digitization efforts. “The grant, which was issued in July, will support the digitization of the AFRO’s full photo archive, help build new tools to increase access to an exhaustive database of images and support the creation of an artificial intelligence informed online research interface…. The AFRO’s full photo collection, spanning more than a century of media coverage that told stories from a unique Black perspective, includes approximately 3 million photographs, [Savannah] Wood highlighted, also estimating that the Afro Charities’ digitization project will take somewhere from five to 10 years.”

Auburn University: Auburn professors’ Selma ‘Bloody Sunday’ project gaining momentum through social media, public support

Auburn University: Auburn professors’ Selma ‘Bloody Sunday’ project gaining momentum through social media, public support. “Auburn University professors Richard Burt and Keith Hébert are turning to social media and the Selma, Alabama, community for help in making progress on their ‘Bloody Sunday’ passion project. The interdisciplinary tandem is enlisting a group of Auburn Honors College students to help expand the project’s reach to the social media realm, and they have established a Facebook page where visitors can connect and help identify marchers who participated in one of the seminal moments in civil rights history—Bloody Sunday on March 7, 1965, in Selma.”

Bay State Banner: Black, queer and part of Boston’s history

Bay State Banner: Black, queer and part of Boston’s history. “Inspired by the racial reckonings of 2020, The History Project, New England’s largest archives of LGBTQ materials, is working to flesh out its collection related to Black queer history. Funded by a Mass Humanities Digital Capacity Grant and spearheaded by Community Curator Fellow Micha Broadnax and Community Connector slandie prinston, Documenting Black Queer Boston will provide physical and digital records for the community to experience and build on.”

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life. “Cornelia Dayton, a professor of history at UConn, has helped uncover some missing pieces in the life story of Phillis Wheatley, author of the first volume of poetry published by an African American. In a prize-winning research paper recently published in the New England Quarterly, Dayton describes her findings on the later parts of Wheatley’s life.” A Web site showcasing the research is underway.

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers. “Connecticut is the first state in the nation to mandate that all of its high schools offer an elective class on Black and Latinx history. These classes must be taught by the fall of 2022, but many high schools have added them to the curriculum this year. Alan Marcus, a professor of curriculum and instruction in UConn’s Neag School of Education, has led a team that developed a website to assist high school teachers with the instruction of this course.” I took a quick look and didn’t see anything that was state-specific.

University of Arkansas: NEH Grant Funds Summer Institute on Nelson Hackett’s Flight From Slavery

University of Arkansas: NEH Grant Funds Summer Institute on Nelson Hackett’s Flight From Slavery. “The $170,000 grant will bring 36 K-12 educators from across the nation to the U of A to study the story of Nelson Hackett, an enslaved man who fled both Fayetteville and bondage in 1841. Hackett’s flight set off an international legal battle that ensured Canada remained a haven for those escaping from slavery in the U.S. South….The Nelson Hackett Project is available free online and can be accessed anytime by anyone wishing to become acquainted with this amazing story.”

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement

Getty: Art and the Black Power Movement. “In 2017–2019, the landmark traveling exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, shone a light on Black artists from the early 60s to the early 80s. A new expansive book conceived as a companion to this exhibition compiles hundreds of important texts from the era reflecting on the influence and power of Black art…. On September 9, the book’s editors, Mark Godfrey and Allie Biswas, will join Getty curator LeRonn P. Brooks for an online discussion about this cultural dialogue. They will explore the powerful ideas put forth by artists and writers who confronted questions of Black identity, activism, art, and social responsibility during the Black Power era.” Free and virtual (Zoom)

Digital Library of Georgia: Birth Registers From Historically Endangered Georgia Nursing Home For Expectant African American Mothers Now Available Freely Online

Digital Library of Georgia: Birth Registers From Historically Endangered Georgia Nursing Home For Expectant African American Mothers Now Available Freely Online. “The Georgia B. Williams Nursing Home in Camilla, Georgia, and the Digital Library of Georgia have worked together to digitize and present online the birth registers of the mothers and babies born at the Georgia B. Williams Nursing Home between 1949-1971.”