Digital Library of Georgia: Family Papers Documenting The Lives Of Enslaved People In Liberty County, Georgia, Dating Back To The 1700s, Are Now Available Online.

Digital Library of Georgia: Family Papers Documenting The Lives Of Enslaved People In Liberty County, Georgia, Dating Back To The 1700s, Are Now Available Online.. “In partnership with the Midway Museum, the Digital Library of Georgia has just made the Julia R. King Collection available online…. The collection includes essential documents related to slavery, including estate appraisals and inventories that include the first names of enslaved African Americans. It will be of particular interest to those doing family research on people enslaved in Liberty County, Georgia.”

Places and Perspectives: MTSU library collaborates on African American communities digital history project (Middle Tennessee State University)

Middle Tennessee State University: Places and Perspectives: MTSU library collaborates on African American communities digital history project. “Long-lost history does not have to stay lost, as long as people are willing to work together to pinpoint the past. ‘Places, Perspectives: African American Community-building in Tennessee, 1860–1920’ is an ongoing project that combines the resources and expertise of James E. Walker Library with help from the Department of Geosciences, MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation (CHP), and a dedicated group of community historians.”

Arizona State University: Unsung heroes of civil rights movement tell their stories

Arizona State University: Unsung heroes of civil rights movement tell their stories. “Curtis Austin, an associate professor of history in Arizona State University’s School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, believes it’s important that the men and women who served both on the front lines and in the background of the civil rights movement have their stories told. To that goal, Austin, along with Matthew Barr, a professor at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, are collaborating on an oral history and book project titled ‘The Unsung Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement.’”

The Rogersville Review: ETSU’s Archives of Appalachia digitizes Black history collection

The Rogersville Review: ETSU’s Archives of Appalachia digitizes Black history collection. “Given to the university more than 20 years ago, the Langston Heritage Group Collection includes a wealth of historical information about Black churches, schools, civic clubs and organizations throughout Washington County from the end of the Civil War to the present. Thanks to archivists at East Tennessee State University, the collection has been digitized and made available online to anyone interested in this history.”

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Milwaukee’s historical Bronzeville lives on at a new website and app dedicated to preserving its stories

Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Milwaukee’s historical Bronzeville lives on at a new website and app dedicated to preserving its stories. “Telling the stories of Milwaukee’s African American families and businesses in a new way is the goal of a project just launched by [Patricia] Diggs and Kitonga Alexander, a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. ‘Milwaukee Bronzeville Histories’ is a website and mobile app that will allow people to learn about the past — and the present — as they walk the northside neighborhood. It went live in time for Bronzeville Week, which begins Saturday.”

Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront

New-to-Me, from Tulane News: Tulane database brings historic activism to the forefront. “The African Letters Project is a free database that consists of over 5,600 letters written between 1945 to 1994, during the decolonization era in many African countries. [Professor Elisabeth] McMahon’s initial idea for the database was to highlight more African American activists who supported independence movements throughout Africa during that period of history.”

National Geographic: Rising seas threaten the Gullah Geechee culture. Here’s how they’re fighting back.

National Geographic: Rising seas threaten the Gullah Geechee culture. Here’s how they’re fighting back.. “Latitude, topography, and proximity to the Atlantic Ocean make the stretch of coastline from Jacksonville, North Carolina, to Jacksonville, Florida—called the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor— particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, storm frequency and intensity, higher temperatures, and a warmer, more acidic ocean.”

Ford Foundation: Ford, Mellon and MacArthur Foundations Transfer Sole Ownership of Historic Ebony and Jet Photo Archive to Getty and NMAAHC

Ford Foundation: Ford, Mellon and MacArthur Foundations Transfer Sole Ownership of Historic Ebony and Jet Photo Archive to Getty and NMAAHC . “A consortium comprising the Ford Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Trust, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution, announced today the official transfer of ownership of the acclaimed Johnson Publishing Company (JPC) archive to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and to the Getty Research Institute, a program of the Getty Trust.”

Troy Today: Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum seeks to engage visitors with interactive app

Troy Today: Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum seeks to engage visitors with interactive app. “Troy University’s Rosa Parks Museum is working to create a mobile app that will engage its visitors, especially young people. The Museum is teaming up with QuantumERA, LLC, an immersive solutions company, to create the ‘Rosa Parks and the Women who Made the Movement’ mobile application, which will feature a virtual Rosa Parks and other unsung figures of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.”

Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies Online Exhibit Opens (University of Nebraska Omaha)

University of Nebraska Omaha: Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies Online Exhibit Opens. “‘Charting Our Path: Celebrating 50 Years of Black Studies (1971-2021)’ digital exhibit is now available online through the UNO Libraries’ website. The exhibit shares the history of one of the oldest Black Studies departments in the nation, highlighting the complex relationship between university administrators, students, and the Omaha Black community.”

Globe Newswire: Getty Images Launches Initiative to Elevate Black History and Empower Storytellers (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Getty Images Launches Initiative to Elevate Black History and Empower Storytellers (PRESS RELEASE). “Getty Images, a preeminent global visual content creator and marketplace, today launched the Black History & Culture Collection (BHCC), an initiative created to provide free non-commercial access to historical and cultural images of the African/Black Diaspora in the US and UK from the 19th century to present day.”

CNN: Descendant of enslaved people can sue Harvard University over photos of half-naked ancestors, state supreme court rules

CNN: Descendant of enslaved people can sue Harvard University over photos of half-naked ancestors, state supreme court rules. “Massachusetts’ highest court has ruled that a woman claiming to be the descendant of enslaved people can proceed with some of the claims in her lawsuit against Harvard University. The June 23 ruling from the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court allows Tamara Lanier to seek damages from Harvard for mistreating her when using photographs of her ancestors — images known as daguerreotypes.”

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement. “[Old Lick Cemetery]’s disturbing story would likely remain a footnote in the city’s history were it not for a project called Hidden in Plain Site, the brainchild of creative agency BrownBaylor. It’s designed to resurface the lost narrative of marginalized Black people across the US with experiences you can view through a browser or virtual reality headset.”

Post and Courier: Oral history project aims to connect recent activism to larger civil rights movement

Post and Courier: Oral history project aims to connect recent activism to larger civil rights movement. “About a year ago, local filmmaker Joshua Parks wanted to interview activists who were affiliated with the Black Lives Matter movement in Charleston. He approached two staff members of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston — Erica Veal and Daron Calhoun. Veal, an archivist, and Calhoun, coordinator of public programming and the Race and Social Justice Initiative, demurred. They weren’t eager to revisit the challenges and traumas of the recent past, Veal said. They told Parks, then a graduate assistant at the Avery, to circle back.”

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok . “The Gullah Geechee people make up one of the oldest and most extraordinary communities in the United States. But if you’ve never heard of them, it might be because their history is often sifted out of textbooks, and the longevity of their culture is now in danger. This distinctly African American community began on the eastern coastal islands — spanning from Florida all the way up to North Carolina in the 1600s. Slaves, mostly from West Africa, lived in complete isolation from the continental United States, separated by rivers, swamps and waterways that weren’t easy to cross.”