UNC: Grant Will Help Librarians Examine Jim Crow Laws Through Lens of Data

UNC: Grant Will Help Librarians Examine Jim Crow Laws Through Lens of Data. “Using optical character recognition and machine learning, the team will build a text corpus of North Carolina session laws from the end of the Civil War through the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and will then compile a listing of North Carolina’s Jim/Jane Crow laws. This effort builds upon work done by civil rights pioneer Pauli Murray in the 1950s.”

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock Completes Digitization Of History Of Segregation, Integration Of Arkansas Schools

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock Completes Digitization Of History Of Segregation, Integration Of Arkansas Schools. “As a result of this project, a unique group of archival collections are now easily accessible online to students and scholars of civil rights, race, education, and the law, as well as the general public. Anyone around the world now has the opportunity to study the evolution of education in Central Arkansas through the lens of religion, the judicial system, and contemporary students and educators. In addition to the more than 350,000 digital files now available online, CAHC has also published a virtual exhibit featuring digital objects from the project along with a timeline, lesson plans, and short essays by scholars.”

Mercer University: Project Aims To Uncover The Untold Stories Of African-Americans In Middle Georgia

Mercer University: Project Aims To Uncover The Untold Stories Of African-americans In Middle Georgia. “A 12-year-old girl named Harriet. A 5-year-old boy named Nathan. They are written into the pages of Bibb County historical deed books, right beside the sale of land and horses. These black children are among more than 400 records of slave transactions that Mercer researchers have discovered so far in just seven volumes. They still have 10 more deed books to go through at the Bibb County Superior Court Clerk’s Office, followed by collections on chattel mortgages, chain gang records and plantation maps. The clerk’s office, Mercer University Library and the Department of Africana Studies have teamed up on an ambitious project to digitize historical documents from 1823 to 1865 related to slavery. They are focusing on Bibb County first but hope to later expand the project to other counties in Middle Georgia.”

Pew: Surging Interest in Black History Gives a Lift to Museums, Tourism

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Surging Interest in Black History Gives a Lift to Museums, Tourism. “Black history museums and historic sites are flourishing across the South, riding a wave of interest in African-American history that has made a stunning success of the two-year-old National Museum of African American History and Culture in the nation’s capital.”

Digital NC: More issues of The Charlotte Post are now online!

Digital NC: More issues of The Charlotte Post are now online!. “More than two dozen additional issues of The Charlotte Post have recently been added to Digital NC. Thanks to our partnership with Johnson C. Smith University, our digital holdings for The Charlotte Post now mostly range in date from 1971 to 1996, and feature newly uncovered early issues from the 1930s. This most recent batch includes those special issues as well as additions from 1991 to 1996. The three partial issues are from 1930, 1931, and 1934, and serve as important resources for African American history in Charlotte at that time.”

Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims (Charleston Chronicle)

Charleston Chronicle: Spiritual Wayfarers: New Lowcountry Digital History Initiative Exhibit Spotlights Lowcountry African Muslims. “The oft-overlooked experiences of the Lowcountry’s African Muslims are the subject of a new digital exhibit now freely available online. The exhibit—formally styled Enslaved and Freed African Muslims: Spiritual Wayfarers in the South and Lowcountry—documents more than three centuries of West African Muslims, from those forcibly brought to the Americas before the War of Independence to adherents of Islam in the Lowcountry today.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Preserving Negro League History Has Never Been Easier, or Harder, Depending on Who You Ask

Smithsonian Magazine: Preserving Negro League History Has Never Been Easier, or Harder, Depending on Who You Ask. “As the 100th anniversary of the birth of ‘black baseball’ approaches, a perplexing issue remains: How do historians extend the mainstream reach of Negro League history? The bulk of this recent interest has been in the statistical realm, which is expanding and becoming more accurate, but focusing on the numbers and trying to compare Josh Gibson to Babe Ruth tends to attract a distinct subset of baseball geek.”