Georgia Public Library Service: “We Endure” Oral History Collection Documents Stories, Struggles of Cairo, Georgia’s African American Community

Georgia Public Library Service: “We Endure” Oral History Collection Documents Stories, Struggles of Cairo, Georgia’s African American Community. “Georgia Public Library Service has digitized over 80 oral history interviews held by the Roddenbery Memorial Library in Cairo, Georgia, and recorded during the early 1980s with African American residents of that area. The collection, titled ‘They Endure: A Chronicle of Courage,’ also includes 50 digitized slides depicting local African American churches and cemeteries in Grady County.”

Manhattan College: New Videos Added to Time Out for Black Lives Digital Library

Manhattan College: New Videos Added to Time Out for Black Lives Digital Library. “Time Out for Black Lives features an interactive website… where coaches and student-athletes from [Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference] basketball programs contribute their time and resources to read children’s books in entertaining videos, all focusing on Black culture, history, music and myths. Posted videos feature short biographies on each coach or student-athlete, with kid-friendly information such as the reader’s hometown, favorite book and favorite basketball player.”

Mountain XPress: New digital archive examines Nina Simone’s relationship with Langston Hughes

Mountain XPress: New digital archive examines Nina Simone’s relationship with Langston Hughes. “In 1949, poet Langston Hughes, right, spoke at Allen High School in Asheville. One of the students in attendance was Eunice Waymon, later known professionally as Nina Simone. In time, the poet and the singer developed a unique friendship, which author and N.C. State University professor W. Jason Miller is currently documenting in an online archive.”

Plano Magazine: Girl Scout Gives New Life to Plano African American Museum

Plano Magazine: Girl Scout Gives New Life to Plano African American Museum. “Zara Jones, a senior at Plano West Senior High, has been a Girl Scout since she was a Daisy Scout in Kindergarten. She is now working toward earning her Gold Award with a project that spotlights the history and contributions of African Americans in Plano and around the United States. The Gold Award is Girl Scouts’ highest honor, earned by less than six percent of Girl Scouts. On Feb. 20 Zara launched the digital Plano African American Museum.”

Color of Change presents The Pedestal Project: an AR experience envisioning racial justice leaders atop plinths left empty (Art Critique)

Art Critique: Color of Change presents The Pedestal Project: an AR experience envisioning racial justice leaders atop plinths left empty. “In cities across the US, empty pedestals are what remain after statues memorialising the Confederate side of the American Civil War were toppled or removed in recent months. Thus, the question has come of what to do with those empty plinths, but Color of Change has created The Pedestal Project, a temporary AR fix to what they hope will become a long-term solution.”

New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point (National Archives News)

National Archives News: New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point. “Photographs of Buffalo Soldiers serving at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, during the early 20th century recently came to light at the National Archives. The images were discovered by a preservationist who was digitizing thousands of nitrate negatives transferred from the Academy to the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives at College Park, MD. Recognized for their expertise in riding, African American cavalry noncommissioned officers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments were stationed at West Point to serve in the Academy’s Detachment of Cavalry and teach Academy cadets military horsemanship.”

Stanford: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley

Stanford University: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley. “While there have been a number of extraordinary Black Americans who have helped transform Silicon Valley into a global hub of high-tech industry and innovation, their lives, stories and accomplishments have been largely absent from public record. A new archive at Stanford Libraries hopes to change that.”

Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana

New-to-me: Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana. “Frederick Baconnais was born during the peak of the sugar cane harvest season at the Evergreen Plantation in Edgard, Louisiana. At 5 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1852, he drew his first breath, according to historic records. His mother, Victorine, a house slave at Evergreen, was 18 years old. He was only two when she died. But Baconnais would name one of his daughters Victoria in remembrance of his mother. Their stories are among several recounted through photos and narratives in Evergreen’s Ancestor Project.”

Christian Post: PCUSA digitizes records of historic Mother Bethel AME Church

Christian Post: PCUSA digitizes records of historic Mother Bethel AME Church. “The national archives of the Presbyterian Church (USA) has digitally preserved records of the historic Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mother Bethel was originally founded in 1794 by Methodist preacher and former slave Richard Allen, who served as the first bishop of the AME denomination.”

San Antonio Magazine: San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum Opens this Month at La Villita

San Antonio Magazine: San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum Opens this Month at La Villita. “After sharing a building with Hope House Ministries for nearly three years, SAAACAM decided to relocate the museum’s educational galleries to a more centralized location. The archives, which include collected photographs and oral histories, also are being processed so they can be available for public access at Texas A&M University San Antonio.”

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light. “On the campus of Kennesaw State University, a disturbing era of Georgia history is now in plain view. ‘There were separate waiting rooms. Separate pharmacies. Entrances. Everything,’ Helen Thomas said. Thomas oversees the university archives. Along with the Digital Library of Georgia at the University of Georgia, she has gone online with the blueprints of hospitals built in the state during the 1940′s and 50′s.”

Artnet: Want to Learn More About Black Artists During Black History Month? Here’s a List of Resources to Get You Started

Artnet: Want to Learn More About Black Artists During Black History Month? Here’s a List of Resources to Get You Started. “In honor of Black History Month, we put together a list of what social media accounts to follow, videos and films to watch, and books to read to catch yourself up on Black art history. This list is not meant to be exhaustive, and of course there are many other ways to learn. But for those looking for a way in, here are some suggestions on where you can begin.”

The A&T Register: 4 Virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month

The A&T Register: 4 Virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month. “It is important to not only take the time to honor the African Americans who made a tremendous impact in our country’s social, civil and political history, but to also honor the African American artists who have created remarkable, awe-inspiring visuals of the Black experience in America. Listed below are a few virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month and beyond.”

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized. “The three newspapers came out of the fort in the 1920s through the 1940s. During that period of history, three infantry divisions at Fort Huachuca were made up of black men. The 25th, 92nd and 93rd. Each had their own unique newsletter designed to keep families of those soldiers up-to-date with what they were doing.”