New Transcription Workflow: African American Civil War Soldiers (Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter)

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter: New Transcription Workflow: African American Civil War Soldiers. “African American Civil War Soldiers recently launched a new workflow to complete the transcription of the military records of all Black men who fought for the Union army, beginning with the famous 54th and 55th Massachusetts regiments.”

DigitalNC: 27 more issues of the Charlotte Post are now available!

DigitalNC: 27 more issues of the Charlotte Post are now available!. “If you’ve been following our announcements of additional issues of The Charlotte Post being made available online, then you’ll be glad to know that issues from the remainder of 1997 and one from March 1998 are now up as well! Our digital holdings for this title currently span 1930-1934 and 1971-1998. These recent additions continue with the same great content, focused particularly for Charlotte’s African American community.”

Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom

Lincoln Journal-Star: UNL project illustrates history of slaves suing for their freedom. “UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities have compiled and digitized court documents from more than 500 freedom suits and published them in an online database titled ‘O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law and Family,’ through a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The project focuses on slavery in the 1820s and 1830s, said project manager Kaci Nash, when African-Americans were held as property by a wide strata of Washington society.”

DC Public Library: Library Acquires Women in the Life magazine

DC Public Library: Library Acquires Women in the Life magazine. “The Library will digitize, maintain and make all 90 issues of Women in the Life Magazine available on Dig DC, the online portal maintained by the DC Public Library’s Special Collections division. When this work is complete, the story of DC’s lesbian of color community will be available to students, scholars, members of the LGBTQ community and anyone else who wants to understand issues that impacted the Black lesbian community from 1993 to 2003.”

Gettysburg Times: Database, website created to preserve Gettysburg’s black history

Gettysburg Times: Database, website created to preserve Gettysburg’s black history. “Thanks to a four-way collaboration, a new website will soon make it possible for local and distant members of the black community to learn about their ancestors who lived in Gettysburg. Historians and others interested in the lives of Adams County’s black population will also find the new resource invaluable.” This database will also include information about African-American soldiers who fought in the Civil War.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Photo archive chronicles 3 generations of a family’s Pittsburgh story

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Photo archive chronicles 3 generations of a family’s Pittsburgh story. “The sepia-toned images chronicle a Pittsburgh story rarely told: three generations of a prominent black family whose members include doctors, athletes, public servants,Tuskegee airmen and some of the smartest, most determined women you’ll ever meet. Though tiny compared with the 80,000 images shot by Pittsburgh Courier photographer Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris, the Dorsey-Turfley photo archive is just as compelling for one simple reason: We know almost everyone in the pictures.”

Wall Street Journal: Filmmaker George Lucas, Wife Mellody Hobson Seek Control of Ebony, Jet Archives

Wall Street Journal: Filmmaker George Lucas, Wife Mellody Hobson Seek Control of Ebony, Jet Archives. “Businesswoman Mellody Hobson and her husband, filmmaker George Lucas, are seeking to take control of Ebony and Jet magazines’ archives, a collection of thousands of pictures and recordings chronicling about 70 years of African-American life and culture that includes original photos of Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Muhammad Ali and Maya Angelou.” Tell you the truth I’ve been fretting about the fate of this photo archive. It’s priceless and irreplaceable. I was really hoping the Library of Congress would get it.