DigitalNC: Earliest NC African American Newspapers Added to DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Earliest NC African American Newspapers Added to DigitalNC. “Today’s post is the result of a chance quote and a successful collaboration. We’re pleased to add to DigitalNC the earliest newspaper published by and for North Carolina African Americans – the Fayetteville Educator – along with another early African American newspaper, the Charlotte Messenger.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy. “For African-Americans wondering whether their own genealogy research might uncover a runaway slave turned war hero or ancestors who prospered despite racial discrimination, there are burgeoning resources. Genealogists, family members and government archives can help black Americans reconstruct a family tree obscured by centuries of neglect and racial injustice. In addition, military records of African-American Civil War soldiers will soon be accessible in a searchable online database.”

Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872 (Out of the Box)

Out of the Box: Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872. “The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the addition of the Lancaster County Fiduciary Records, 1657-1872, to Virginia Untold. This collection contains the earliest records added to Virginia Untold, and the largest number of names added from a single locality so far—over 20,000. Fiduciary records primarily consist of estate administrator settlements, estate inventories, dower allotments, estate divisions, estate sales, and guardian accounts that record a detailed list of all personal property owned by individuals, including enslaved people.”

DigitalNC: DigitalNC adds 700+ issues of Raleigh’s Carolinian newspaper

DigitalNC: DigitalNC adds 700+ issues of Raleigh’s Carolinian newspaper. “Issues of The Carolinian from 1945 to 1959 are now available on DigitalNC, after recently being transferred from a microfilm format to a digital one. This newspaper is still in print and based in Raleigh, North Carolina, where it shares news among its predominantly African American audience.”

Florida State University: FSU professor’s research spurs educational curriculum

Florida State University: FSU professor’s research spurs educational curriculum. “The ‘Find Your Voice: The Online Resource for Fannie Lou Hamer Studies’ includes school lesson plans, a new animated short movie by BrainPOP, a children’s book titled ‘Planting Seeds: The Life and Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer’ and a virtual tour of locations related to Hamer. A powerfully eloquent proponent of the civil rights movement, Fannie Lou Hamer was known around the world for declaring that she was ‘sick and tired of being sick and tired.'”

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans. “The Hogan Jazz Archive of the Howard Tilton Memorial Library was awarded a $11,500 grant from the GRAMMY Museum Grant Program to digitize and preserve recordings from Vernon Winslow, the first African American disc jockey in New Orleans.”