DigitalNC: More issues of The AC Phoenix are available on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: More issues of The AC Phoenix are available on DigitalNC. “Forty-five additional issues of The AC Phoenix are now available thanks to our partner, N.C. A&T University. These additions, from 1990 to 2006, share more news from North Carolina’s Triad region and beyond for readers. Based in Winston-Salem, The AC Phoenix provides an invaluable resource for Triad African American communities and has been an institution in the region since Rodney Sumler founded the paper in 1983.”

Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection

Barbados Government Information Service: Barbados Has Digital Runaway Slaves Collection. “The Department of Archives has partnered with the Early Caribbean Digital Archive (ECDA) at Northeastern University to create the Barbados Runaway Slaves Digital Collection. The collection is based on runaway advertisements in the recently digitized newspaper, The Barbados Mercury Gazette. It will provide a central location where Mercury advertisements are collected, a transcription platform, and other opportunities for the public, especially students, both in Barbados and abroad, to use the material in creative ways.”

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore. “In Nov. 1966, the first issue of ‘Chicory,’ written by everyday residents of Baltimore City, was published. Publishing original poetry with little to no editing, the magazine grew as a space for young people of color in the poorest neighborhoods of the city to express themselves. Working as a ‘vehicle for civic dialogue’ and fostering a community environment among the Black ghetto, ‘Chicory’ was for who [Mary] Rizzo described as ‘people who don’t necessarily like to write, but who have something to say.'”

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history. “In 1513, a free and literate African named Juan Garrido explored Florida with a Spanish conquistador, Juan Ponce de León. In the following decades, Africans, free and enslaved, were part of all the Spanish expeditions exploring the southern region of the United States. In 1565, Africans helped establish the first permanent European settlement in what is St. Augustine, Florida today. The Slave Societies Digital Archive which I direct as a historian at Vanderbilt University includes Catholic Church records from St. Augustine. These records date back to the 1590s and document some of the earliest black history of the U.S.”

Respect: Black Veterans Project Campaign Launch

Respect: Black Veterans Project Campaign Launch. “The Black Veterans Project (BVP), a veteran-led, multi-organizational startup, today announced the official launch of their IndieGoGo campaign to raise funds for a full-length documentary recounting the experiences of current and former Black servicemembers, from the Vietnam War to present-day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Co-founded by veterans Kyle Bibby and Richard Brookshire, BVP has a mission to preserve the legacy of the 2.5 million Black veterans living in the United States. Through the creation of a full-length documentary and digital archive of oral histories of Black veterans from all walks of life, BVP hopes to raise awareness of racial justice issues in the military and post-service.”

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians

Library of Virginia: Library Of Virginia And Virginia Museum Of History & Culture Merge Databases Of Records Of Enslaved Virginians. “The Virginia Museum of History & Culture (VMHC) and the Library of Virginia are cooperating to provide greater access to African American history and genealogy in Virginia. In early January of 2019, the VMHC’s Unknown No Longer project (over 500 documents containing nearly 12,000 names) was merged with the Library’s Virginia Untold: The African American Narrative (over 10,000 records with more than 100,000 names), providing researchers with unprecedented access to an expanded collection of resources on the history of enslaved and free African Americans in Virginia. The combined databases are now available through the Virginia Untold web page.”

CAIR: CAIR Research Director Launches ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University

CAIR: CAIR Research Director Launches ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University. “The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization, today announced that CAIR National Director of Research and Advocacy Dr. Abbas Barzegar has launched the ‘After Malcolm Digital Archive’ with George Mason University’s Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies.”