Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.

Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.. “[Professor Ananya] Chakravarti convened a team of students, community members and experts to assemble a digital collection of U Street history that, she hopes, will make the area’s rich past easier to access and understand. She calls it ‘community-based historical preservation.'”

Mother Jones: Can White Graduates of Racist Schools Unlearn Hate?

Mother Jones: Can White Graduates of Racist Schools Unlearn Hate?. “As kids, they were thrown into ‘segregation academies’ in the South—private all-white schools where parents could send their children to avoid the integration of public schools, and where kids were, as one put it, ‘conscientiously and misguidedly furnished with an unbending white universe.’… Now, graduates of those all-white schools are telling stories about the resounding racism they learned—and the decades that some have spent unlearning or trying to unlearn it.”

WTVR: These Virginia museums are teaming up to preserve historical treasures

WTVR: These Virginia museums are teaming up to preserve historical treasures. “The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (VMHC) and the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia (BHMVA) recently announced a permanent partnership in which extensive collections of original documents, photographs and artifacts will be housed and cataloged at VMHC’s facilities. Eventually, the items will be digitized and placed in VHMC’s online database so that anyone can review and research the items.”

The Elm: Tea And Talk Explores African American Print Culture

The Elm (Washington College): Tea And Talk Explores African American Print Culture. “Dr.[Alisha] Knight specializes in teaching courses focusing on both African American literature and history, and has put both her knowledge on the subject and her passion for her work into this project. Her project, ‘Putting Them on the Map,’ explores the rise of African American magazine agents throughout the 1900s across the United States.” The Web site for the project is not ready yet.

CHSToday (South Carolina): A new local storytelling tool for African American history

CHSToday: A new local storytelling tool for African American history. “Late this June, Explore Charleston launched a new website with the vision of the African American experience in Charleston being seen + heard. The site, titled ‘Voices: Stories of Change,’ is a collection of history + stories told through the viewpoint of Charleston’s African American community.”

DigitalNC: Earliest NC African American Newspapers Added to DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Earliest NC African American Newspapers Added to DigitalNC. “Today’s post is the result of a chance quote and a successful collaboration. We’re pleased to add to DigitalNC the earliest newspaper published by and for North Carolina African Americans – the Fayetteville Educator – along with another early African American newspaper, the Charlotte Messenger.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”