The Body: Archive Remembers Heroes and History of Black HIV/AIDS Activism

The Body: Archive Remembers Heroes and History of Black HIV/AIDS Activism. “Several projects are attempting to archive the history of AIDS activism — there’s the ACT UP Oral History Project, Visual AIDS’ Archive Project, and a number of LGBT archives, including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture’s LGBT archive. And yet much of what has emerged as public memorials of the AIDS epidemic and its heroes has focused on a handful of mostly white activists and organizations. The long history and impact of black AIDS activists, particularly during the early years of the epidemic, are less known. Dan Royles, a writer and assistant professor of history at Florida International University, wants to make sure we know about those stories.”

Larry Ferlazzo: A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Teaching About Reparations

Larry Ferlazzo: A Beginning List Of The Best Resources For Teaching About Reparations. “I have resources on reparations at NEW & REVISED: THE BEST RESOURCES I’VE USED (OR WILL USE) IN LESSONS ABOUT RACE & RACISM. However, especially now with the idea being taken more seriously in the public debate, I thought I’d take the materials there – and add more – to create a new ‘Best’ list to add to all my resources on race and racism.”

Announcing the Restore the Ancestors 2019 Project: Help Us Index Records for African American Genealogy (International African American Museum)

International African American Museum: Announcing the Restore the Ancestors 2019 Project: Help Us Index Records for African American Genealogy. “The Center for Family History at the International African American Museum, FamilySearch and BlackProGen Live have announced the launch of Restore the Ancestors 2019, a volunteer community effort to index FamilySearch records of interest for African American genealogy, with a special focus on records for the former slaveholding states.”

Penn Today: Research, context, and community merge at Penn and Slavery Symposium

Penn Today: Research, context, and community merge at Penn and Slavery Symposium. “This year’s Penn Slavery Project students and Brown presented some of their findings, both from last fall and the current semester. Students addressed economic ties to the slave trade and early fundraising efforts as well as connections between early medical research and the topic of biological racism. The Project will increase access to its research through a new website featuring all of the students’ work.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Cohen, Price receive NEH grant for Charles Chesnutt Digital Archive

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Cohen, Price receive NEH grant for Charles Chesnutt Digital Archive. “The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $292,627 to the University of Nebraska–Lincoln for work on The Charles Chenutt Digital Archive, a free electronic archive of the writings of African-American author Charles Chesnutt edited by Stephanie Browner (of The New School), Matt Cohen, and Kenneth M. Price. The grant, awarded by the NEH’s Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program, will support two years of work at UNL’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities and at The New School in New York City to expand and update the archive.”

University of Oregon: New collection helps preserve the legacy of a civil rights trailblazer

University of Oregon: New collection helps preserve the legacy of a civil rights trailblazer. “Thanks to an anonymous UO Libraries donor, the legacy of African-American journalism in Oregon — and knowledge of an important civil rights pioneer — is becoming more accessible than ever. The generous gift is funding digitization of six new titles that will diversify the perspectives represented in the library’s Historic Oregon Newspapers online resource. Debuting in February 2019, The Advocate is the first of the papers to come online, with issues dating from October 1924 to December 1933 now available.”

New York Times: There’s No Afro Emoji. These Women Want to Change That.

New York Times: There’s No Afro Emoji. These Women Want to Change That.. “Many people connected to the African diaspora have Afros. And like anyone else, they send emojis to their friends — a zombie, say, or a mermaid or a genie. But which emoji can they use to represent themselves?”