Pasadena Now: Pasadena Museum of History’s Black History Collection Is Now Available Online

Pasadena Now: Pasadena Museum of History’s Black History Collection Is Now Available Online. “The overall project involves digitization of approximately 17,000 items, including paper materials, historic photographs, video recordings, and other unique items from collections held by six community archives in the L.A. as Subject research alliance. The project will add to the visibility of collections that document underrepresented community histories.”

The Legal Aid Society: Racial Disparities in NYPD’s COVID-19 Policing

The Legal Aid Society: Racial Disparities in NYPD’s COVID-19 Policing. “To better understand the disproportionate impacts of the NYPD’s COVID-19 related enforcement, the Legal Aid Society analyzed social distancing complaints made through 311 between March 28 and May 12, COVID-19 related summonses reported by the NYPD between March 16 and May 5, and internally-tracked COVID-19 related arrests that took place between March 27 and May 2.”

CNN: Magic Johnson will provide $100 million to fund loans to minority-owned businesses

CNN: Magic Johnson will provide $100 million to fund loans to minority-owned businesses. “Magic Johnson may no longer be playing in the NBA, but the Hall of Fame member is still making valuable assists. Johnson announced that EquiTrust Life Insurance Co., of which he owns a majority, is providing $100 million in capital to fund federal loans for minority and women business owners who have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.”

‘Sorrowful’: Black clergy members and churches reeling from COVID-19 losses (ABC News)

ABC News: ‘Sorrowful’: Black clergy members and churches reeling from COVID-19 losses. “ABC News identified at least 33 African American bishops, reverends and pastors who led various denominations around the country who have died from the coronavirus, according to an analysis of news reports. There were seven in Michigan (including two from the same church), seven in Louisiana, six in New York, three in Illinois, two in Mississippi, two in Georgia, two in New Jersey, one in Virginia, one in Tennessee, one in Alabama and one in Missouri.”

Dayton Daily News: UD project to digitally preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy

Dayton Daily News: UD project to digitally preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy. “The legacy of Dayton native Paul Laurence Dunbar will be forever preserved in a digital archive thanks to a nearly $100,000 grant awarded to the University of Dayton. On April 7, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded UD a three-year $99,992 implementation grant to develop interdisciplinary courses and create a digital archive to help preserve the legacy of Dunbar, one of the first influential black poets in American literature.”

Arizona State University: African American community experiencing higher rates of COVID-19 exposure, infection and death

Arizona State University: African American community experiencing higher rates of COVID-19 exposure, infection and death. “Researchers are discovering that health differences between racial and ethnic groups are often due to economic and social conditions, lower access to health care and other existing heath disparities. Mako Fitts Ward, a clinical assistant professor with ASU’s School of Social Transformation and faculty lead of African and African American Studies, said all of these conditions have left the African American community especially vulnerable during the pandemic. An educator, writer, facilitator and social justice advocate with over 15 years of experience teaching core principles of justice and social change to college students and advocating for racial and gender equity in communities around the country, ASU Now spoke to Ward about her observations on how COVID-19 has impacted the African American community.”

Chattanooga Times Free Press: Historically black colleges work to help students amid coronavirus

Chattanooga Times Free Press: Historically black colleges work to help students amid coronavirus. “It is a perilous time for the nation’s historically black colleges and universities, which have long struggled with less funding and smaller endowments than their predominantly white peers and are now dealing with the financial challenges of the coronavirus. HBCUs have the added challenge of educating a large population of low-income and first-generation students who now need more help than ever.”