Association of Southeastern Research Libraries: ASERL Launches Shared Exhibit

From early November, but I missed it then. The Association of Southeastern Research Libraries: ASERL Launches Shared Exhibit. The link is to a PDF file. “The exhibit, ‘Enslaved People in the Southeast,’ was curated by a team of nine archivists and contains more than 100 items related to the American slavery and its after-effects. Items in the exhibit include auction records and other bills of sale, plantation records, materials from the abolitionist movement, and photographs and other items from the Jim Crow South.”

Cavalier Daily: Mapping Cville Project launches crowdsourcing phase to create map of housing discrimination origins

Cavalier Daily: Mapping Cville Project launches crowdsourcing phase to create map of housing discrimination origins . “The project aims to develop an interactive digital map of past and present inequities in Charlottesville, and its first layer will show housing discrimination origins by plotting every deed in the City that contains a racially restrictive covenant — clauses within property deeds that restricted the sale of properties to only white residents and often explicitly prohibited sales to African-Americans.”

Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student

Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student. “With a desire to bring Black women and nonbinary activists out of the heavy depths of forgotten history, [Jaimee] Swift founded Black Women Radicals, an organization that shines a light on past and present leadership across the African diaspora. After over a year of dedicated research, Swift did a soft launch in October.”

DigitalNC: Cleveland County Memorial Library Collection of Materials from the Black Community is Now Live on DigitalNC!

DigitalNC: Cleveland County Memorial Library Collection of Materials from the Black Community is Now Live on DigitalNC!. “DigitalNC partner Cleveland County Memorial Library provided us with a rich collection of documents, photographs, and yearbooks related to the history of Black citizens in the area. Much of the collection focuses on Black schools that were established during the era of Jim Crow and segregation. These schools were created out of necessity but did not survive integration, leaving their history vulnerable. Fortunately people like Ezra A. Bridges, a longtime educator and community activist, made it a priority to preserve items related to the Black experience in Cleveland County.”

My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched

My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched. “Five years after Vermont law enforcement officers first became required to document the race of all drivers they pull over in traffic stops, that information has proven to be difficult to come by. However, a Vermont racial justice group has just made the data significantly easier to find.”

Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.

Washington Post: D.C.’s Black Broadway is gone. A Georgetown professor wants to remind U Street newcomers of its history.. “[Professor Ananya] Chakravarti convened a team of students, community members and experts to assemble a digital collection of U Street history that, she hopes, will make the area’s rich past easier to access and understand. She calls it ‘community-based historical preservation.'”

CNET: Facebook apologizes after anonymous post alleges racism at company

CNET: Facebook apologizes after anonymous post alleges racism at company. “Facebook apologized Friday after an anonymous online document alleged that black, Latino and Asian women continued to face racism at the company a year after a former employee brought the issue into public view. The post, titled ‘Facebook empowers racism against its employees of color’ and published on Medium, outlines incidents that 12 current and former employees experienced while on the job.”