Transatlantic Slave Trade Database Has Gotten An Update

The Transatlantic Slave Trade Database is has gotten an update. “Inspired by the remarkable public response, we recently developed an animation feature that helps bring into clearer focus the horrifying scale and duration of the trade. The site also recently implemented a system for visitors to contribute new data. In the last year alone we have added more than a thousand new voyages and revised details on many others.”

PRNewswire: New Memorial Database Lists Georgians Who Died in World War I (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: New Memorial Database Lists Georgians Who Died in World War I (PRESS RELEASE). ” Georgians who died in service during World War I are being commemorated in a unique way as part of the centennial observance of the ‘Great War.’ In a project sponsored by the Georgia World War I Centennial Commission, retired state librarian Dr. Lamar Veatch is compiling an on-line database that, when complete, will be the most comprehensive listing of Georgia service personnel who died in service during that war 100 years ago. The names and information for some 1,300 soldiers and sailors are now on the Centennial Commission’s website and others are being added as they are confirmed.” The press release goes on to note that while the initial information from the database comes from a 1921 book, the racism of the time meant that African-American soldiers were not included. This online database will correct that and does include African-American soldiers.

UMass Amherst: Why Is This Linguist #Talmbout Twitter?

UMass Amherst: Why Is This Linguist #Talmbout Twitter?. “The lickety-split spread of the phrase stay woke is just one linguistic development you can clearly track via Twitter, says Lisa Green ’93, professor of linguistics at UMass Amherst….Green recently collaborated with Brendan O’Connor, assistant professor at the College of Information and Computer Sciences, and computer science doctoral student Su Lin Wang Blodgett on a case study of dialect in Twitter conversations among African Americans. They collected a whopping 59 million tweets from 2.8 million users, including 830,000 tweets aligned with Twitter users in African American English-speaking neighborhoods.”

The Future Outlook: Documenting African American Communities in Greensboro from WWII-1970’s (DigitalNC)

Digital NC: The Future Outlook: Documenting African American Communities in Greensboro from WWII-1970’s. “The Future Outlook, a community newspaper from Greensboro, NC, is now available on DigitalNC. Thanks to our partner, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, nearly 25 years of the paper are now online and full-text searchable. The nearly 450 editions range from 1941-1947, 1949, 1952, and 1958-1972. The Future Outlook served an African American community in Greensboro and documents major events from their perspective.”

Cornell: Hip Hop Collection releases online trove on genre’s rise

Cornell: Hip Hop Collection releases online trove on genre’s rise. “Cornell University’s Hip Hop Collection is releasing hundreds of newly digitized images that tell the story of hip-hop’s explosion into the international mainstream and shed new light on some of its biggest stars, including LL Cool J, Queen Latifah and Public Enemy.”

Library of Congress: Portraits of Nineteenth Century African American Women Activists Newly Available Online

Library of Congress: Portraits of Nineteenth Century African American Women Activists Newly Available Online. “African American women as well as men assumed civic responsibilities in the decades after the Civil War. William Henry Richards (1856-1941) was active in several organizations that promoted civil rights and civil liberties for African Americans at the end of the nineteenth century. Richards taught at Howard University Law School from 1890 until his retirement in 1928. In 2013, the Library acquired his collection from the descendants of William C. McNeill, his physician at the end of Richards’ life. Both men were on the faculty of Howard University.”

University of Southern Mississippi Launches Digital Archive on Racially-Segregated Libraries

The University of Southern Mississippi has launched a new digital archive about racially-segregated libraries. “The archive is entitled ‘The Roots of Community: Segregated Carnegie Libraries as Spaces for Learning and Community-Making in Pre-Civil Rights America, 1900-65.’ The research includes information on 12 segregated Carnegie libraries (or ‘Carnegie Negro Libraries’ as they were called then), a group of public libraries that opened between 1900 and 1925.”