BK Reader: New Online Rolodex Spotlights Minority-Owned Small Businesses This Black Business Month

BK Reader: New Online Rolodex Spotlights Minority-Owned Small Businesses This Black Business Month. “A new rolodex of Black, Brown and women owned small businesses in New York City is being launched online this National Black Business Month. The Big Black Book NYC, a social media directory collating and promoting minority owned businesses, is launching its new website to celebrate local entrepreneurs, coinciding with the directory’s third anniversary.”

CNET: Google will help you find Black-owned businesses

CNET: Google will help you find Black-owned businesses. “Google is adding new ways to help users find and support Black-owned businesses, the search giant said Thursday. US merchants with a verified Google Business Profile can now add a Black-owned business attribute to their profile so customers can see that it’s Black-owned when they find that business through Google Search and Maps, according to a blog post.”

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery. “The transatlantic slave trade officially ending in the 19th century, but the effects of that brutal system continue to reverberate in the genes of enslaved people’s ancestors, according to a new study. Pairing genetic data with historical records, researchers at 23andMe can now paint a clearer picture of African ancestry in the New World, detailing the origins of enslaved Africans and the methods used to exploit them after they survived the grueling Middle Passage.”

Republican American: Black-owned businesses in state get their own website

Started in January and I apparently missed it. From the Republican American: Black-owned businesses in state get their own website. “A collaborative effort by a team of 30 volunteers, the website has a directory with links to Black-owned businesses in the state and also provides marketing resources for them. Since its launch July 1, 775 businesses, covering everything from restaurants to consultants to photographers, have signed on.”

University of Washington: UW Libraries publishes new online research guides on racial justice, African American experience in Pacific Northwest

University of Washington: UW Libraries publishes new online research guides on racial justice, African American experience in Pacific Northwest. “The African American Research & Archival Collections in the Pacific Northwest Collections guide was compiled and released in June. This guide highlights archival and printed materials, photographs and moving image collections available in UW Special Collections that relate to Black communities, political groups and civil rights movements in the Pacific Northwest. UW Libraries also has created a tab titled ‘Racial Justice Resources: Keeping Current.’ The guide is a starting point for students and faculty ‘seeking to better understand issues related to racial justice and racism in America.'” Yes, some of the content is university access only, but the Keeping Current page is stuffed with resources. STUFFED.

Digital Public Library of America: DPLA announces new partnerships with five libraries and archives to build national digital Black women’s suffrage collection

From July 14, just found it this morning. Digital Public Library of America: DPLA announces new partnerships with five libraries and archives to build national digital Black women’s suffrage collection. “Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) today announced a set of partnerships with the Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library; Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture in Charleston, South Carolina; Tuskegee University; the Amistad Research Center at Tulane University; and Southern California Library to collaborate on the creation of a national digital collection that highlights the roles and experiences of Black women in the women’s suffrage movement, as well as Black women’s history of activism, as part of the centennial celebration of the passage of the 19th Amendment.”

Schools dazed : HBCUs struggle to re-open amid coronavirus (The Grio)

The Grio: Schools dazed : HBCUs struggle to re-open amid coronavirus. “Black colleges have always been able to do more with less, producing the majority of America’s black doctors (50%) and judges (80%) despite being chronically underfunded by states and having to fill in the gaps of the lousy public schools many black students graduate from. Which is part of why coronavirus hits so hard—not because of any particular management or failing by HBCUs, but because it’s almost impossible to come up with a coordinated plan for school success when you’re caught up in a mixture of state and federal red-tape, harsh financial realities and racism.”

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms. “Amid widespread job loss, reduced hours, and pay cuts, more than 12.5 million renters, like [Lacresha] Lewis, were unable to make their most recent payment, according to survey data collected last week and released by the U.S. Census Bureau Wednesday. And nearly 24 million people have little to no confidence in their ability to pay next month’s rent, Census data show. Approximately 56% of those anxious renters are Black or Latinx — the populations that are also more likely to rent, and more likely to spend a bigger portion of their income on housing. That’s while Black and Latinx people have been disproportionately harmed by the virus itself, and the resulting job loss. ”

State Archives of North Carolina: New Additions to the African American Education Digital Collection, part 3

State Archives of North Carolina: New Additions to the African American Education Digital Collection, part 3. “The Digital Services Section of the State Archives of North Carolina is pleased to announce new additions to the African American Education digital collection. Since 2016, we have been digitizing a large selection of items related to the Division of Negro Education from the Department of Public Instruction record group. These items were selected to highlight the efforts of several individuals to improve the lives of African Americans through education after the eradication of American slavery. Furthermore, they illustrate how difficult it was to fight for equal education within a segregated school system.”

TNW: Google ad portal equated ‘Black girls’ with porn

TNW: Google ad portal equated ‘Black girls’ with porn. “Google’s Keywords Planner, which helps advertisers choose which search terms to associate with their ads, offered hundreds of keyword suggestions related to ‘Black girls,’ ‘Latina girls,’ and ‘Asian Girls’ — the majority of them pornographic, The Markup found in its research. Searches in the keyword planner for ‘boys’ of those same ethnicities also primarily returned suggestions related to pornography.”

Mental Floss: Explore Marian Anderson’s Handwritten Letters, Private Recordings, and More in a Newly Digitized Collection

Mental Floss: Explore Marian Anderson’s Handwritten Letters, Private Recordings, and More in a Newly Digitized Collection. “More than 2500 items of archival material, including letters, diaries, journals, interviews, scrapbooks, performance programs, and private recordings, are available to view online through a research portal called ‘Discovering Marian Anderson.’ Many of the manuscripts were donated by Anderson, who was born and raised in Philadelphia, before she died at age 96 in 1993.”

Route Fifty: Pandemic Threatens Black Middle-Class Gains

Route Fifty: Pandemic Threatens Black Middle-Class Gains. “The Black middle class has made strides in recent years toward economic parity with whites in 34 states, a new Stateline analysis has found. But the pandemic threatens that progress, as Black professionals and businessowners lose their livelihoods at greater rates than their white counterparts.”

ProPublica: What Coronavirus Job Losses Reveal About Racism in America

ProPublica: What Coronavirus Job Losses Reveal About Racism in America. “The economic and health crisis brought on by the pandemic has struck Black Americans especially hard: from their prevalence among workers in essential high-risk fields, to their disproportionate share of deaths, to extensive job losses. But the racial disparities didn’t begin with the virus. National unemployment numbers that now seem unprecedented for workers as a whole have been a daily reality for many Black communities for decades. See how different groups have experienced unemployment in the graphic below.”

WBAL: Therapy in Color helps connect Black Americans with therapists of color

WBAL: Therapy in Color helps connect Black Americans with therapists of color. “A new website is making it easier than ever for people of color to get specialized mental health help. From nationwide protests to the coronavirus pandemic, mental health issues are at an all-time high. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Black Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population.”

New York Times: Black Business Owners Had a Harder Time Getting Federal Aid, a Study Finds

New York Times: Black Business Owners Had a Harder Time Getting Federal Aid, a Study Finds. “A nonprofit sent Black and white ‘mystery shoppers’ to branches of 17 banks, where they asked for loans under the Paycheck Protection Program. White customers got better treatment.”