KIVI: Boise State Senior creates social media platform, Scholarships-Africa

KIVI: Boise State Senior creates social media platform, Scholarships-Africa. “Boise State Senior, Sunday “Paul” Adah is the Founder and CEO of Scholarships-Africa. He left his friends and family back in 2015 to enroll in a university more than 73-hundred miles away…. ‘Growing up in Africa there’s a lot of challenges with finding funding to get a good education,’ he said, ‘I noticed that a lot of Africans and black minorities have the same struggles.’ It was those struggles that inspired Scholarships-Africa, a social media platform created to connect students to scholarship opportunities.”

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage. “Despite comprehensive efforts over the years to record Los Angeles’s historic places, the city’s historic designation programs do not yet reflect the depth and breadth of African American history. Just over three percent of the city’s 1,200 designated local landmarks are linked to African American heritage. Over the next three years, the project will work with local communities and cultural institutions to more fully recognize and understand African American experiences in Los Angeles. The work aims to identify and help preserve the places that best represent these stories and work with communities to develop creative approaches that meet their own aims for placemaking, identity, and empowerment.”

University of Dayton: University of Dayton faculty develop courses, digital archive to preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy with $150K grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

University of Dayton: University of Dayton faculty develop courses, digital archive to preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy with $150K grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. “The two-year, $150,000 Mellon Foundation grant provides funding for building the digital Dunbar Library and Archive, which will make hundreds of Dunbar-related documents artifacts freely available online. It also provides funding for faculty who want to integrate Dunbar into their courses and for students to participate in Dunbar-related research experiences. In addition, the grant provides funding for two organizational partners, Saint Louis University’s Center for Digital Humanities and Ohio History Connection.”

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color. “The University of Maryland Libraries, the Atlanta University Center Robert Woodruff Library and the nationwide consortium Project STAND have received a $750,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand a free digital archive of documents and artifacts chronicling activism among college students of color. The multi-institutional collection includes oral histories, recordings of student radio, film and digital photography, posters, newspapers and other documentation of diverse movements and groups, stretching from the present as far back as student abolitionist activity during African American enslavement.”

NBC 5 : ‘Black voices of Vermont’ aims to build community and promote learning

NBC 5: ‘Black voices of Vermont’ aims to build community and promote learning. “A new project in Vermont aims to amplify voices of Black youth and strengthen a sense of community. ‘We’re getting progressively better over time,’ Yeshua Armbrister, 19, said of Vermont communities’ goal of being ever more inclusive. Armbrister is one of the first participants in Black Voices of Vermont, a new, interactive media project focused on highlighting the experiences and viewpoints of Black teens in the predominantly white state.”

KFOR: Library of Congress agrees to change subject heading from ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ to ‘Tulsa Race Massacre’

KFOR: Library of Congress agrees to change subject heading from ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ to ‘Tulsa Race Massacre’. “A task force at the University of Oklahoma has spearheaded an effort to change how the Library of Congress catalogs the Tulsa Race Massacre. Officials say Library of Congress Subject Headings are extremely important and are often used to find important resources on topics when searching online library catalogs. Following a proposal by a task force at the University of Oklahoma Libraries, the Library of Congress agreed that the term ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ was not completely accurate.”

WRAL: Virtual reality project brings back Black neighborhoods

WRAL: Virtual reality project brings back Black neighborhoods. “Imagine if you could walk through Charlotte [North Carolina]’s Brooklyn neighborhood again, gliding past the homes, businesses and churches cleared by urban renewal more than a half-century ago.That’s the mission of researchers at Johnson C. Smith University, who received a trio of grants to preserve records and histories from several former Black neighborhoods in Charlotte. Their end goal: An virtual reality experience created with historical photos and 3-D models where viewers could experience long-gone neighborhoods.”

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries . “Struggles for Liberty takes its name from the phrase ‘struggles in the cause of liberty’, written by Lewis Henry Douglass (eldest son of Frederick Douglass) of his mother, Anna Murray Douglass’s tireless, heroic antislavery and social justice activism. The resource is structured by theme: the ‘Story of the Slave’; the History of Black Abolition; the US Civil War; African American activists in Scotland; and the Anna Murray and Frederick Douglass Family. It also includes interactive maps and downloadable learning activities for teachers, including activities mapped to the Curriculum for Excellence.”

Blavity: There’s Been A Surge In Black Medical School Applicants Amid COVID’s Devastation On BIPOC Communities

Blavity: There’s Been A Surge In Black Medical School Applicants Amid COVID’s Devastation On BIPOC Communities. “While there are only 5 percent of doctors reported to be Black, per NBC News, medical schools have been taking notice of the up to 43 percent increase in Black applicants since the beginning of the pandemic. Howard University’s College of Medicine reported a 28 percent increase in Black applicants, while Morehouse School of Medicine reported 26 percent and Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine with 43 percent.”

JAMA Network: Association of Vitamin D Levels, Race/Ethnicity, and Clinical Characteristics With COVID-19 Test Results

JAMA Network: Association of Vitamin D Levels, Race/Ethnicity, and Clinical Characteristics With COVID-19 Test Results. “In this cohort study of 4638 individuals with a measured vitamin D level in the year before undergoing COVID-19 testing, the risk of having positive results in Black individuals was 2.64-fold greater with a vitamin D level of 30 to 39.9 ng/mL than a level of 40 ng/mL or greater and decreased by 5% per 1-ng/mL increase in level among individuals with a level of 30 ng/mL or greater. There were no statistically significant associations of vitamin D levels with COVID-19 positivity rates in White individuals.”

KSAT: Proposed African American cemetery database pending in Congress

KSAT: Proposed African American cemetery database pending in Congress. “Nationally recognized for his work that often bears historical and cultural significance, Everett Fly, is also known for helping descendants find and restore forgotten African-American cemeteries. Word about Fly’s expertise reached the offices of U.S. Reps. Alma Adams, of North Carolina, and A. Donald McEachin, of Virginia. The representatives introduced the African-American Burial Grounds Network Act, which would create a national database of African American cemeteries.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Historic Georgian African American newspapers dating from 1886-1926 are now available freely online, thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

Digital Library of Georgia: Historic Georgian African American newspapers dating from 1886-1926 are now available freely online, thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. “The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce that it has completed the digitization of two historically significant Georgia African American newspapers as part of a National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The digital images will be included in the Library of Congress’ newspaper site: Chronicling America.”

Arizona State University: Introducing the Black Women Composers Project

Arizona State University: Introducing the Black Women Composers Project. “Now online and poised for growth, the Black Women Composers Project points to the ASU Library’s growing collection of over 160 newly available scores, including symphonies, operas, choral works, vocal music and chamber music, and features biographies, compositions and sound recordings belonging to 15 significant composers in the 20th and 21st centuries.”

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief. “By the time the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma began distributing vaccines to tribal citizens, LeEtta Osborne-Sampson had already witnessed nearly two dozen members of her extended family die of COVID-19. She was relieved vaccine doses had finally arrived to protect those who remained. But when she showed up at the Indian Health Service clinic in Wewoka, the capital of the Seminole Nation, staffers refused to give her a shot. They told her that she wasn’t eligible because her tribal ID card identifies her as a Freedman, a Seminole citizen who is a descendant of enslaved Black people.”