Hollywood Reporter: Twitch Says It’s Deleted Livestreamed Video of Mass Shooting Posted by Gunman

Hollywood Reporter: Twitch Says It’s Deleted Livestreamed Video of Mass Shooting Posted by Gunman. “Livestream service Twitch has deleted video posted by an 18-year-old who authorities say opened fire with a rifle Saturday at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, killing 10 people and wounding three others. A representative for Twitch told The Hollywood Reporter that the company removed the livestream less than two minutes after the shooting began at the Tops Friendly Market.”

Mashable: New online campaign reminds us that street harassment isn’t a rite of passage. It’s a public health concern.

Mashable: New online campaign reminds us that street harassment isn’t a rite of passage. It’s a public health concern.. “[Candice] Cho’s story is just one representation of a diverse array of tales shared through the #SaferPlace social media campaign, a new effort by advocates to document the frequent harassment that women, people of color, and LGBT and gender nonconforming people face in public spaces. As May is Asian and Pacific Islander (API) Heritage Month, the social media effort adds a sense of heightened, nuanced awareness of the intersectional public safety issues faced by members of these diverse communities.”

Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on” (CBS News)

CBS News: Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on”. “Work performed this month will help answer a question residents of the area called Africatown USA are anxious to resolve: Can remnants of the slave ship Clotilda be retrieved from the water to both fill out details about their heritage and to serve as an attraction that might revitalize the place their ancestors built after emancipation?”

Florida International University: FIU awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grant to highlight contributions of Miami’s Black residents

Florida International University: FIU awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grant to highlight contributions of Miami’s Black residents. “The grant will help provide enhanced access to the papers of Dana A. Dorsey, a successful businessman known as Miami’s first Black millionaire. At the project’s conclusion, implemented data collection methodologies and access strategies will be analyzed and shared through a white paper to help establish best practices in the field. The paper will include plans for potential partnerships and will identify additional resources, collections, organizations, and individuals to help expand the work.”

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing

NPR: How one book influencer championing Black authors is changing publishing. “[Cree] Myles first partnered with Penguin Random House last year, when she organized a read-a-thon called Black Like We Never Left featuring works by Toni Morrison. The late, heralded, Pulitzer and Nobel-prize winning author was published by Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House. A few months later Penguin Random House offered Myles a job curating an Instagram platform centered on Black books.”

Washington City Paper: Documenting D.C.’s Doo-Wop Histories

Launched last month but I’m just learning about it now, from the Washington City Paper: Documenting D.C.’s Doo-Wop Histories. “Working with a team of music scholars, [Beverly] Lindsay-Johnson has designed a detailed online platform that tells the story of Black D.C. rhythm and blues acts from the 1940s and ’50s, while documenting the local venues, radio stations, DJs, record stores, and history of that segregated time.”

PR Newswire: Vaseline® Launches See My Skin – The only database designed to search for conditions on skin of color and connect patients with Dermatologists who understand their skin care needs (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Vaseline® Launches See My Skin – The only database designed to search for conditions on skin of color and connect patients with Dermatologists who understand their skin care needs (PRESS RELEASE). “Research published by the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that less than 6% of image-based search results show conditions on skin of color.1 In an effort to close that gap, Vaseline® is introducing See My Skin, alongside partners at HUED, a digital health company focused on improving quality of care for Black, Latinx and Indigenous populations through education, access and data, and VisualDx, medical informatics company that is dedicated to reducing healthcare bias by improving clinical decisions through visualization. In joining forces, See My Skin was created as the only online database designed to search conditions on skin of color and connect people with the proper care they deserve.”

Chicago Tribune: University project aims to show how everything you know about the history of Black Illinois is kind of lacking

Chicago Tribune: University project aims to show how everything you know about the history of Black Illinois is kind of lacking. “…two years ago, [Kate] Masur and a handful of Northwestern undergraduates and graduate students started work on an online exhibition of sorts, part of an even larger archive that now spans several universities and museums, to document the radical importance of the Colored Conventions movement, one of our first nationwide conversations on race. Recently launched, their website… does not have the sexiest title: ‘Black Organizing in Pre-Civil War Illinois: Creating Community, Demanding Justice.’ But its history is more accessible than academic and its intent is ambitious: No less than a reframing of Black Illinois itself.”

Artnet News: Artist Derrick Adams Wins $1.25 Million From the Mellon Foundation to Start a Database Documenting the Black Culture of Baltimore

Artnet News: Artist Derrick Adams Wins $1.25 Million From the Mellon Foundation to Start a Database Documenting the Black Culture of Baltimore. “This week, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation announced that it will award $1.25 million to the Black Baltimore Digital Database, a new archive cataloguing important cultural contributions by Black Baltimoreans.”

Westchester Journal News: New database highlights African American burial grounds across NY state

Westchester Journal News: New database highlights African American burial grounds across NY state. “The following is an unofficial database of African American burial grounds in New York, compiled by this reporter through research and information provided by various sources. It’s aim is to help the public in tracking these sacred sites. It will grow with your input.”

Keene Sentinel: Newly digitized Daniels archive helps local civil rights hero’s legacy live on

Keene Sentinel: Newly digitized Daniels archive helps local civil rights hero’s legacy live on. “Civil rights martyr Jonathan Daniels’ name is enshrined in several institutions in Keene, his 1939 birthplace, but only recently have local archivists digitized materials associated with his life — and it’s thanks in part to state moose license plates….Daniels was murdered by a police officer in small-town Hayneville, Ala., on Aug. 20, 1965, while protecting a young Black civil rights activist, Ruby Sales.”

Revisiting and Archiving Civil Rights and Atlanta in the 1960s: Introducing the Mayor Ivan Allen Digital Archive (Georgia Tech Libraries)

Georgia Tech Libraries: Revisiting and Archiving Civil Rights and Atlanta in the 1960s: Introducing the Mayor Ivan Allen Digital Archive. “This one-day symposium will formally introduce the Mayor Ivan Allen Digital Archive, while at the same time exploring the intersection of archives, Atlanta history, and art. The sessions will showcase how communities are preserving their experiences in ways that encourage us to creatively think about the future of archives.” This event does not seem to have a virtual component; I note it here because of the launch of the digital archive.

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade. “Conflicts among African nations during the collapse of the kingdom of Oyo in the early 19th century resulted in the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of people. Soldiers and traders removed men, women and children from their homes, transported them to coastal ports and loaded them onto slave ships—their names, birth places and family ties erased. Historians have a pretty good record of where these individuals departed Africa, but due to a lack of primary sources, little is known about where they originated before boarding slave ships. CU Boulder researchers are hoping to change that with a first-of-its-kind mathematical model estimating conditional probabilities of African origins during the transatlantic slave trade.” I have this under “Research” instead of “New Resources” because the map is more an expression of the model and not a polished […]