CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month

CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month. “Google wants you to learn more about how black culture has shaped American history. Google Earth has made an interactive map in honor of Black History Month in collaboration with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. The journey shines light on how black history has shaped the American experience in areas like advocacy, business, film, TV, education and technology.”

DigitalNC: DigitalNC’s newest newspaper title, The AC Phoenix, is available now!

DigitalNC: DigitalNC’s newest newspaper title, The AC Phoenix, is available now!. “The AC Phoenix serves the African American communities in and around North Carolina’s Triad region. Based in Winston-Salem, this paper has decades of experience sharing local and national news with its readers. There’s more to come, but this first batch includes issues from 1987 to 1989, and from 2007 to 2015.”

Forbes: New Legislation Seeks To Protect Lost African-American Burial Grounds

Forbes: New Legislation Seeks To Protect Lost African-American Burial Grounds. “In just the past year, construction projects and archaeological surveys have encountered numerous examples of undocumented African American burial grounds across the country. Archaeological testing encountered the remains of a 19th century African American burial ground in Philadelphia; construction crews in Fort Bend County, Texas, discovered nearly 100 unmarked graves of African American prison inmates believed to have been forced to work in sugar fields long after emancipation was declared; and, archaeologists working for the Maryland Department of Transportation uncovered a previously unknown slave cemetery in Crownsville, Maryland.”

University of Iowa: Rare Recordings of Civil Rights Activists Available Now

University of Iowa: Rare Recordings of Civil Rights Activists Available Now. “In 1963 and 1964, attorney Bob Zellner recorded a series of interviews with civil rights activists in Mississippi and Alabama. Zellner conducted the interviews on behalf of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in an effort to document the activists’ experiences, which were often under challenging and violent circumstances. The interviewees participated in the Mississippi Summer Project in 1964, later to be known as Freedom Summer, a drive to register African Americans in the Magnolia State to vote. For decades, attempts by blacks to register at county court houses across the state were met with intimidation, harassment, and even violence. Freedom Summer was an organized response to this situation, with activists from across the U.S. participating, including over 800 college and university students. Among them were about a dozen students from the University of Iowa.”

Study: With Twitter, Race Of The Messenger Matters (University of Kansas)

University of Kansas: Study: With Twitter, Race Of The Messenger Matters. “When NFL player Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice, the ensuing debate took traditional and social media by storm. University of Kansas researchers have found that tweets both in support of and opposed to the protests can influence how young people think about the issue and, like in many aspects of life, the messenger’s race matters.”

KWTX: First Texas Black Business Week observance begins

New-to-me, from KWTX: First Texas Black Business Week observance begins. “The first observance of Texas Black Business Week got underway Monday, coinciding with Black History Month, and its creator hopes the event becomes just as widespread by offering minority business owners a chance in the spotlight. ‘This is the beginning of what is to come in the state of Texas,’ says Ronnie Russell. He is the creator of Texas Black Pages, an online database of black-owned businesses.” The Web site is available at http://www.texasblackpages.com/ , and I hope you appreciate me looking it up because now I’m hungry for Ava’s Caribbean Restaurant and it’s two in the morning.

The 1916-1917 Colored Directory: A Window into Oakland’s Vibrant Past (California Genealogical Society)

California Genealogical Society: The 1916-1917 Colored Directory: A Window into Oakland’s Vibrant Past. “CGS is pleased to announce a new acquisition: a rare copy of the 1916-1917 Colored Directory of the Leading Cities of Northern California, which will be of special interest to genealogists researching African Americans in California.” The directory has been digitized and is freely available on the Society’s Web site.