Digital Library of Georgia: How I Built A Funeral Program Collection for African Americans in Atlanta

Digital Library of Georgia: How I Built A Funeral Program Collection for African Americans in Atlanta. “What started as a friendly competitive thought has now become another resource for researchers as well as scholars (I am one of the latter) who are interested in the individuals and local communities represented in the individual documents. The Atlanta funeral programs collection could possibly provide the information needed by a family historian (like myself) working to piece together their family’s story. This collection will always mean a lot to me, not only because I helped to start it but also because members of my own family are featured in the collection.”

San Antonio Express-News: Black history preserved in collection donated to San Antonio African American Community Archive

San Antonio Express-News: Black history preserved in collection donated to San Antonio African American Community Archive. “The largest known San Antonio African American history collection now resides with the San Antonio African American Community Archive Museum. Laura Thompson, CEO and creator of The African American Network, has donated her collection of biographies to the museum, located in La Villita. The collection, called 300 Voices in 300 Days, was part of the city’s tricentennial celebration.”

Reuters: The race to save African-American cemeteries from being ‘erased’

Reuters: The race to save African-American cemeteries from being ‘erased’. “There are no national estimates on the number of Black cemeteries that are under threat from developers or have been abandoned. In Florida, where the governor this month signed a bill creating a task force to study the issue, lawmakers estimate there could be as many as 3,000. [Barbara] Heath and others have been supporting bills in Congress that would create a database of African-American cemeteries across the country and fund education and preservation programs.

Mashable: Google Assistant debuts new Black history feature for Juneteenth

Mashable: Google Assistant debuts new Black history feature for Juneteenth . “On Saturday morning, Google unveiled the addition of a Black history function, available to users of any Assistant-enabled smart speaker, smart display, or phone. Just ask ‘Hey Google, what happened today in Black history?’ and the voice assistant will recite daily history content curated by Google with the help of civil rights activist and scholar Dr. Carl Mack.”

Chowan Herald: African American Experience launches on Juneteenth

Chowan Herald: African American Experience launches on Juneteenth. “A regional tourism initiative designed to connect people with Black heritage and historical sites will kick off Saturday. The African American Experience of Northeast North Carolina highlights the contributions of African Americans while encouraging a better understanding of the region’s cultural heritage.” The site includes a “digital heritage trail” of the sites.

USA Today: Negro Leagues stats officially incorporated into Baseball Reference’s database

USA Today: Negro Leagues stats officially incorporated into Baseball Reference’s database. “For the better part of three decades, Black baseball players competed on identical fields under the same rules as their white counterparts, but were considered inferior – even if their style of play and level of competition said otherwise. Last December, Major League Baseball took a giant step toward correcting that by officially elevating the Negro Leagues to major league status. The transformation takes another step forward Tuesday with Negro League statistics now listed alongside those of the American League and National League on Baseball-Reference.com.”

Grand Rapids Business Journal: The Right Place unveils online database of diverse business owners

Grand Rapids Business Journal: The Right Place unveils online database of diverse business owners. “The filterable directory is a database of more than 1,200 minority-, women-, veteran- and LGBTQ+-owned businesses in 13 West Michigan counties, which includes Kent, Barry, Montcalm, Ionia, Ottawa, Allegan, Newaygo, Mecosta, Mason, Muskegon, Oceana, Lake and Osceola counties.”

California State University Northridge: CSUN Prof Weighs the Power of Social Media to Empower Communities of Color

California State University Northridge: CSUN Prof Weighs the Power of Social Media to Empower Communities of Color. “Video of the murder of George Floyd in May 2020, taken by witnesses, sparked outrage on social media, fueled by the fact that this was not the only online video of an officer taking the life of a Black American. According to California State University, Northridge criminology and justice studies professor Brianne Posey, young activists using video of encounters between police officers and civilians of color are both helping and not helping shift the power dynamic between the two groups.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery. “UNC Greensboro University Libraries, along with faculty partners across the state, has received an $150,000 digital extension grant from The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) to expand its Digital Library on American Slavery (DLAS) to three more campuses in North Carolina: North Carolina Central University, UNC Pembroke, and East Carolina University.”

KQED: How Some Elders are Working to Preserve the Legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland

KQED: How Some Elders are Working to Preserve the Legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland. “In Buffalo’s view, one of the most important things he can do is continue to preserve the legacy of the Black Panther Party for the generations to come. Buffalo’s story brings up a larger issue of ownership, power and historical narrative when it comes to preserving and sharing the legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, and the broader Bay Area. He’s one of many people eager to ensure the history of the Black Panther Party is accessible and available to the public.” This man spends most of what he receives in government assistance on maintaining a storage unit containing Black Panther Party history and archives. Even when he doesn’t have a place to live he’s focused on safeguarding history.

Dominion Energy: $500k Grant from Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to Support Virginia HBCU Humanities Research

Dominion Energy: $500k Grant from Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to Support Virginia HBCU Humanities Research. “Virginia Humanities announced a $500,000 grant from the Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation to help support research by Black and Indigenous scholars, and other scholars of color who are affiliated with Virginia’s historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), including their alumni outside Virginia and at non-HBCU institutions.”

College of Charleston: New Digital Exhibits Explore Untold Facets of Black History in the Lowcountry

College of Charleston: New Digital Exhibits Explore Untold Facets of Black History in the Lowcountry. “Since its launch in 2014, the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative (LDHI) has worked with scholars and students to produce online exhibits, each dedicated to illuminating the Lowcountry’s forgotten histories. With topics spanning enslaved African Muslims to Charleston’s first Latino communities, LDHI’s team believes digital interpretation can play a major role in the preservation of diverse stories. This semester, LDHI, hosted by the Lowcountry Digital Library at the College of Charleston, has debuted two new exhibits, Hidden Voices and the Morris Street Business District.”

‘Super cool’: Minnesota’s oldest Black-owned newspaper puts its archive online (MPR News)

MPR News: ‘Super cool’: Minnesota’s oldest Black-owned newspaper puts its archive online. “The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder has documented daily life in the Twin Cities’ Black community for more than 85 years. But until recently, finding stories from that rich past meant slogging through stacks of old newsprint. Now, that history can be found with a few clicks. Archives reaching back to 1934 are online now at the Minnesota Historical Society’s digital newspaper hub.”

CNBC: Black Wall Street was shattered 100 years ago. How the Tulsa race massacre was covered up and unearthed

CNBC: Black Wall Street was shattered 100 years ago. How the Tulsa race massacre was covered up and unearthed. “At the turn of the 20th century, the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma, became one of the first communities in the country thriving with Black entrepreneurial businesses….On May 31, 1921, a white mob turned Greenwood upside down in one of the worst racial massacres in U.S. history. In the matter of hours, 35 square blocks of the vibrant Black community were turned into smoldering ashes. Countless Black people were killed — estimates ranged from 55 to more than 300 — and 1,000 homes and businesses were looted and set on fire.”