Los Angeles Sentinel: Lucas Museum Acquires African American Film History Archive ‘SEPARATE CINEMA’

Los Angeles Sentinel: Lucas Museum Acquires African American Film History Archive ‘SEPARATE CINEMA’. “The Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, currently under construction in Los Angeles’s Exposition Park, is thrilled to announce its recent acquisition of the Separate Cinema Archive, which documents African American cinema history from 1904 to 2019.”

DigitalNC: New Additions of The Carolinian Added to DigitalNC

DigitalNC: New Additions of The Carolinian Added to DigitalNC. “Issues of The Carolinian, from 1962 to 1964, have now been added to DigitalNC thanks to our partner, Olivia Raney Local History Library. The Carolinian is an active newspaper still published out of Raleigh, N.C., covering local, regional, and national stories that impact and interest the African American community at large.”

Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874: Now Online (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874: Now Online. “The striking, forward-thinking motto, ‘Right Is of No Sex–Truth Is of No Color–God Is the Father of Us All, and All We Are Brethren,’ initially appeared on December 3, 1847 in the first issue of The North Star, the earliest newspaper African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass founded and edited. That issue is one of 568 now digitized and freely available in Frederick Douglass Newspapers, 1847-1874 on the Library of Congress website.”

Inside Indiana Business: Madam Walker Collection Digitized, Preserved

Inside Indiana Business: Madam Walker Collection Digitized, Preserved. “The Indianapolis Historical Society has completed a 12-month-long project to digitize 40,000 historical papers and photographs associated with Indianapolis entrepreneur and philanthropist Madam C.J. Walker. Madam Walker’s beauty products empire made her one of the wealthiest women of the early 1900s.”

Sightlines: Years of ‘In Black America’ Radio Series Digitized, Made Public

Sightlines: Years of ‘In Black America’ Radio Series Digitized, Made Public. “Covering a breathtaking swath of the African American experience — education, style, economics, social issues, sports, families, culture, literature, science and politics — ‘In Black America’ has featured interviews with luminaries including writer and photographer Gordon Parks, Sr.; dance pioneer and choreographer Alvin Ailey; the Rev. Jesse Jackson; architect John S. Chase, the first black architect licensed in Texas; poet Nikki Giovanni; and author Maya Angelou.”

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods. (This link leads to a Facebook post.) “The ‘Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods’ story map project details the often destructive impact of urban renewal and interstate projects of the mid-20th century on Tennessee’s African American communities. The project combines GIS software and primary sources to create an interactive exhibit whereby users can visualize the direct effects of these public works projects in cities across Tennessee.”

Museum Hue Creates Map for Museums Created by People of Color in the United States

Museum Hue has created a map of what it describes as Culturally-specific museums created by people of color in the United States.. A clickable map on top and more detailed listings below. When you first look at the listings underneath you might think, “That’s not so many,” but it’s only a few of the over four dozen museums listed here, from the Somali Museum of Minnesota to the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Nice annotation.