New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point (National Archives News)

National Archives News: New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point. “Photographs of Buffalo Soldiers serving at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, during the early 20th century recently came to light at the National Archives. The images were discovered by a preservationist who was digitizing thousands of nitrate negatives transferred from the Academy to the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives at College Park, MD. Recognized for their expertise in riding, African American cavalry noncommissioned officers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments were stationed at West Point to serve in the Academy’s Detachment of Cavalry and teach Academy cadets military horsemanship.”

Stanford: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley

Stanford University: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley. “While there have been a number of extraordinary Black Americans who have helped transform Silicon Valley into a global hub of high-tech industry and innovation, their lives, stories and accomplishments have been largely absent from public record. A new archive at Stanford Libraries hopes to change that.”

Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana

New-to-me: Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana. “Frederick Baconnais was born during the peak of the sugar cane harvest season at the Evergreen Plantation in Edgard, Louisiana. At 5 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1852, he drew his first breath, according to historic records. His mother, Victorine, a house slave at Evergreen, was 18 years old. He was only two when she died. But Baconnais would name one of his daughters Victoria in remembrance of his mother. Their stories are among several recounted through photos and narratives in Evergreen’s Ancestor Project.”

CNBC: Google’s program for Black college students suffered disorganization and culture clashes, former participants say

CNBC: Google’s program for Black college students suffered disorganization and culture clashes, former participants say. “In 2017, Lauren Clayton joined the inaugural class of Howard West, Google’s on-campus immersion program for Black college students. She became a star scholar whose big smile would grace marketing materials and news coverage. As the only Black woman in that inaugural class to score a coveted internship offer from Google, she now says the program’s leaders didn’t deliver on the promises that inspired her to accept the offer in the first place.”

Christian Post: PCUSA digitizes records of historic Mother Bethel AME Church

Christian Post: PCUSA digitizes records of historic Mother Bethel AME Church. “The national archives of the Presbyterian Church (USA) has digitally preserved records of the historic Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mother Bethel was originally founded in 1794 by Methodist preacher and former slave Richard Allen, who served as the first bishop of the AME denomination.”

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive

University of Alabama: UA Professor Receives Prestigious Grant to Create Digital Dance Archive. “Funded by a nearly $100,000, two-year National Endowment for the Humanities grant, [Professor Rebecca] Salzer is collaborating with University of Texas at Austin dance professor Gesel R. Mason and Alabama Digital Humanities Center director Dr. Anne Ladyem McDivitt to create an online archive based on Mason’s collection of recordings titled No Boundaries: Dancing the Visions of Contemporary Black Choreographers. The digital archive will be constructed using the open-source software CollectiveAccess, and will serve as a prototype for future dance archives.”

San Antonio Magazine: San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum Opens this Month at La Villita

San Antonio Magazine: San Antonio African American Community Archive and Museum Opens this Month at La Villita. “After sharing a building with Hope House Ministries for nearly three years, SAAACAM decided to relocate the museum’s educational galleries to a more centralized location. The archives, which include collected photographs and oral histories, also are being processed so they can be available for public access at Texas A&M University San Antonio.”

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light. “On the campus of Kennesaw State University, a disturbing era of Georgia history is now in plain view. ‘There were separate waiting rooms. Separate pharmacies. Entrances. Everything,’ Helen Thomas said. Thomas oversees the university archives. Along with the Digital Library of Georgia at the University of Georgia, she has gone online with the blueprints of hospitals built in the state during the 1940′s and 50′s.”

Artnet: Want to Learn More About Black Artists During Black History Month? Here’s a List of Resources to Get You Started

Artnet: Want to Learn More About Black Artists During Black History Month? Here’s a List of Resources to Get You Started. “In honor of Black History Month, we put together a list of what social media accounts to follow, videos and films to watch, and books to read to catch yourself up on Black art history. This list is not meant to be exhaustive, and of course there are many other ways to learn. But for those looking for a way in, here are some suggestions on where you can begin.”

‘Better Business Bureau meets Consumer Reports’: Black Dollar Index ranks companies by support of Black America (USA Today)

USA Today: ‘Better Business Bureau meets Consumer Reports’: Black Dollar Index ranks companies by support of Black America . “A group of Black professionals from health care, consumer packaged goods, media, finance, politics, and consulting came together in weekly zoom meetings during the social unrest last summer to volunteer their time building The Black Dollar Initiative. Soon, the Black Dollar Index was born. It weighs qualitative and quantitative factors to measure each company’s commitment to diversity and investments in causes important to Black Americans and score them from 0-100.”

The A&T Register: 4 Virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month

The A&T Register: 4 Virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month. “It is important to not only take the time to honor the African Americans who made a tremendous impact in our country’s social, civil and political history, but to also honor the African American artists who have created remarkable, awe-inspiring visuals of the Black experience in America. Listed below are a few virtual Black art exhibits to see for Black History Month and beyond.”

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized. “The three newspapers came out of the fort in the 1920s through the 1940s. During that period of history, three infantry divisions at Fort Huachuca were made up of black men. The 25th, 92nd and 93rd. Each had their own unique newsletter designed to keep families of those soldiers up-to-date with what they were doing.”

Grit Daily: Does Google’s Black-Owned Business Search Really Help Black Entrepreneurs? We Asked Them.

Grit Daily: Does Google’s Black-Owned Business Search Really Help Black Entrepreneurs? We Asked Them.. “Google first introduced the tool last summer, but is promoting it during Black history month as a reminder that the fight for racial equity is nowhere near over. You may notice it right now on Google’s home page, for example. Now, nearly a year later, we spoke with Black business owners from around the United States on how Google’s tool has impacted their business, as well as how they think major tech companies like Google can continue to help them in the future.”