Matador Network: How the EatOkra app helps diners ‘be aware and intentional’ of who they support

New-to-me, from Matador Network: How the EatOkra app helps diners ‘be aware and intentional’ of who they support . “The database — which currently lists 2,600 Black-owned restaurants, bakeries, cafes, food trucks, bars and wineries — is on the verge of a major expansion. Around 5,000 new businesses have reached out to Edwards since June 1, requesting to be added to the EatOkra directory.”

Vinyl Factory: Discover over 2000 Black artists and labels on Bandcamp on this new website

Vinyl Factory: Discover over 2000 Black artists and labels on Bandcamp on this new website. “Alongside name, location and genre filters, Blackbandcamp allows users to use a ‘random shuffle’ feature to discover new artists and music. Spanning over 2,000 Black artists and Black labels on Bandcamp at the time of writing, the website will be continually updated.”

Archinect: NMAAHC launches initiative to celebrate the work of Black architects

Archinect: NMAAHC launches initiative to celebrate the work of Black architects. “The National Museum of African American History and Culture has launched Rendering Visible, a digital collecting initiative intended to celebrate the ‘creative production’ of Black architects.”

CNBC: Black doctors push for anti-bias training in medicine to combat health inequality

CNBC: Black doctors push for anti-bias training in medicine to combat health inequality. “George Floyd’s last words, ‘I can’t breathe,’ have become a rallying cry during the weeks of protests against police violence. Doctors writing in the New England Journal of Medicine use those words as a refrain to lay out how systemic racism has negatively impacted the health of African Americans and how this is the moment to change it.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: More than 100 years of African American funeral programs now online

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: More than 100 years of African American funeral programs now online. “The Digital Library of Georgia recently added more than 3,000 African American funeral home programs from Atlanta and throughout the Southeast to its vast collection of online sources. The programs span from 1886 to 2019 and can be great sources of information for genealogists. The materials that were digitized were contributed by the Auburn Avenue Research Library of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, the Wesley Chapel Genealogy Group and the Metro-Atlanta Chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society. Funding came from Georgia HomePlace, a program of the Georgia Public Library Service.”

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities. “On the homepage, users can see a snapshot of COVID-19 deaths across the country. Selecting a state brings up a map displaying COVID-19 mortality by county. Drilling down, users can select a county to see how it compares to the rest of the state and to the country in average daily cases and deaths, and in social characteristics, such as percentage of residents who are African-American, percentage who live in poverty, percentage who are obese, percentage who have diabetes, and more. The dashboard allows users to compare counties within the same state, aggregating key metrics that tell a story of a community’s social and economic health.”

Texas Monthly: 14 Resources for Teaching Your Kids About Racial Injustice

Texas Monthly: 14 Resources for Teaching Your Kids About Racial Injustice. “We’ve talked about racism and the history of violence against African Americans that extends to this day, and their teachers have led discussions on tolerance, fairness, and inclusiveness. Still, as the questions keep coming along with a need for more understanding, I turned to the minds behind the state’s African American Studies high school elective, which was based on an initiative conceived by board member Aicha Davis and piloted in Dallas schools last school year. This past fall, when the Texas State Board of Education was considering implementing the class, students testified to the course’s benefits. Not only did it help them understand more about African American history, they said, it helped them understand the ways that historical events led to oppression today—and think about ways they can promote justice.”

FiveThirtyEight: Many White Americans Are Ready To Reopen The Economy. Black Americans Aren’t.

FiveThirtyEight: Many White Americans Are Ready To Reopen The Economy. Black Americans Aren’t.. “….not all Americans are anxious for businesses to reopen. In fact, there is a fairly stark divide among white, black and Hispanic Americans in their responses to this question. Black Americans, in particular, still overwhelmingly favored keeping businesses closed. The AEI poll found that 82 percent of black Americans said it’s better for the government to take all necessary steps to ensure the public is safe, even if means keeping businesses closed for longer and hurting the economy, while only 16 percent said that businesses should be allowed to open back up if some are put at risk — a finding that was basically unchanged since March. A solid majority (65 percent) of Hispanic Americans also thought public health needs should come first, although that has fallen from 81 percent in March.”

OneZero: The Digital Archives of the Oldest Black Newspaper in America Show a Long Struggle for Justice

OneZero: The Digital Archives of the Oldest Black Newspaper in America Show a Long Struggle for Justice. “I first encountered the Afro’s collection while working on an oral history project in East Baltimore. I tagged along with a colleague and visited the Afro’s archive, looking for a historical photo of the neighborhood I was studying. What I found there blew me away. In a meandering series of rooms filling the back portion of a nondescript building on Baltimore’s North Charles Street sat thousands upon thousands of boxes, floor to ceiling, filled with 8×10 photographs. History literally spilled from these boxes, with photos covering tables, desks, even walls. You could open a box and find original photos of Aretha Franklin, a 1930s wedding, or a protest — basically any event, large or small, personal or national, of the past century. As a techie (and especially one in 2010), my first thought was, ‘This has to be digital.'” This is a really long, but really good, read.

CNET: Instagram to review how its policies, algorithm impact black users

CNET: Instagram to review how its policies, algorithm impact black users. “Instagram plans to reevaluate its policies in an effort to ensure black voices are heard on the app. In a blog post on Tuesday, Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri promised to address inequities in the social media company’s approach to harassment, account verification, content distribution and algorithmic bias.”

MLife: Search database of black-owned businesses in Michigan

MLive: Search database of black-owned businesses in Michigan. “Want to support a black-owned business in your area? Check out our statewide database. The database was created as black business owners try to find solid ground as the state slowly reopens local economies and protests for racial equality have erupted around the world.”

Forbes: The American Black Film Festival Goes Online This Year

Forbes: The American Black Film Festival Goes Online This Year. “The American Black Film Festival will be taking place online only this year. The festival, overseen by ABFF Ventures LLC, has been running in person for the last 24 years. The annual fest usually draws 7,000 to 10,000 people to Miami Beach, but this year due to social distancing concerns and the coronavirus, the festival will take place on August 21-30, 2020… While it will be online only, the schedule will still boast studio premieres, conversation, panels, business of entertainment seminars and virtual networking events. ”

‘Dead’ links and ‘missing’ systemic changes: Inside Google’s response to the George Floyd protests (NBC News)

NBC News: ‘Dead’ links and ‘missing’ systemic changes: Inside Google’s response to the George Floyd protests. “Ten current and former Google employees spoke to NBC News about the internal dynamics at the company on the condition of anonymity because of strict company policies against speaking to news organizations, as well as non-disclosure agreements signed by ex-employees. The sources pointed to rising complaints from some black Google employees about how the company has responded to the ongoing protests in support of racial justice and against police violence, exacerbated by what they see as the company’s retreat on diversity and inclusion initiatives.”

Dayton Daily News: Lawmaker asks if ‘colored population’ not washing their hands as well as others behind COVID rates

Dayton Daily News: Lawmaker asks if ‘colored population’ not washing their hands as well as others behind COVID rates. “During a hearing on whether to declare racism a public health crisis, state Sen. Steve Huffman, R-Tipp City, asked if ‘the colored population’ is hit harder by the coronavirus because perhaps they don’t wash their hands as well as other groups. Huffman, an emergency room physician, asked a witness before the Senate Health Committee on Tuesday why COVID-19 is hitting African Americans harder than white people.”

The Atlantic: America Is Giving Up on the Pandemic

The Atlantic: America Is Giving Up on the Pandemic. “The risk of transmission is complicated by, and intertwined with, the urgent moral stakes: Systemic racism suffuses the United States. The mortality gap between black and white people persists. People born in zip codes mere miles from one another might have life-expectancy gaps of 10 or even 20 years. Two racial inequities meet in this week’s protests: one, a pandemic in which black people are dying at nearly twice their proportion of the population, according to racial data compiled by the COVID Tracking Project at The Atlantic; and two, antiblack police brutality, with its long American history and intensifying militarization.”