Adventures with AI: Here’s what happened when I ate a three course meal designed by artificial intelligence (The Next Web)

The Next Web: Adventures with AI: Here’s what happened when I ate a three course meal designed by artificial intelligence. “I first sought culinary inspiration from GPT-3, a text generator that’s destined to either Take Over The World or burn out in a blaze of bigotry and pseudophilosophy. The model’s been trained on a gobsmacking quantity of data, including the entire English-language Wikipedia, two vast corpora of books, and a filtered version of the Common Crawl. With so many recipes now online, GPT-3 must have learned its way around the kitchen. Right I put my stomach on the line to find out.”

ZDNet: AI can write a passing college paper in 20 minutes

ZDNet: AI can write a passing college paper in 20 minutes. “AI can do a lot of things extremely well. One thing that it can do just okay — which, frankly, is still quite extraordinary — is write college term papers. That’s the finding from EduRef, a resource for students and educators, which ran an experiment to determine if a deep learning language prediction model known as GPT-3 could get passing marks in an anonymized trial.”

Carnegie Mellon University: CMU Students Train AI to Write Book of Limericks

Carnegie Mellon University: CMU Students Train AI to Write Book of Limericks. “Mitch Fogelson, a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering, said he and his fellow students — Xinkai Chen, who completed the Master of Information Systems Management program in December 2020; Qifei Dong, a master’s degree candidate in electrical and computer engineering; Christopher Dare, a master’s degree candidate in information and communication technology; and Tony Qin, a junior artificial intelligence major — opted to focus their AI on limericks because the form has a fixed AABBA rhyming structure. Also, they had access to a database of 90,000 limericks that they could use to train their AI.”

BGR: This new app lets you create photorealistic fake people – and it’s mind-blowing

BGR: This new app lets you create photorealistic fake people – and it’s mind-blowing. “Epic Games earlier today announced a new browser-based tool that lets users create photorealistic characters and, not surprisingly, the end result is quite impressive. Dubbed the MetaHuman Creator, the new tool is designed to make what would otherwise be a potentially costly and resource-intensive task accessible, quick, and straight-forward.” There’s a video embedded in the article that is absolutely wild.

VentureBeat: What it takes to create a GPT-3 product

VentureBeat: What it takes to create a GPT-3 product. “Granted, a disruptive technology might need more time to create a sustainable market, and GPT-3 is unprecedented in many respects. But developments so far show that those who stand to benefit the most from GPT-3 are companies that already wield much of the power in AI, not the ones who want to start from scratch.”

Ubergizmo: This AI Playing A Non-Stop Bass Solo Is All Kinds Of Impressive

Ubergizmo: This AI Playing A Non-Stop Bass Solo Is All Kinds Of Impressive . “Playing a musical solo can be difficult, especially if you’re required to think and improvise on the spot. This is because our brains need to make the connection as to which note that we should go to next, whether or not it’ll sound good, the different rhythms we can apply, and so on. However, it’s a different story when it comes to AI which can think of these things more objectively.”

The Next Web: New AI Scrabble mod only allows words that don’t exist

The Next Web: New AI Scrabble mod only allows words that don’t exist. “A festive game of Scrabble is a time-tested method of surviving the extended company of obnoxious family members. But losing to a crabby relative can make their company even worse. But this year, uncle Nigel (name changed to protect identity) will face a different challenge. Thanks to a new AI version of the classic board game, his distressing knowledge of the dictionary will be of no use at all — because real words no longer count.”

Parents: This Website Turns Your Child’s Artwork Into Music—Inspired by a Teen Who Is Nonverbal

Parents: This Website Turns Your Child’s Artwork Into Music—Inspired by a Teen Who Is Nonverbal. “Many nonverbal people use art and music when they can’t express themselves verbally, but it goes beyond just communicating. From boosting self-esteem to improving depression and anxiety to stimulating the brain, there’s no doubting the benefits of art and music for a person’s health. For Riley, markers, paint, and paper are a go-to form of self-expression. By uploading a piece of her art to Unspoken Symphony, a unique melody can be created just for her.”

TNW: This AI tool generates your creepy lookalikes to trick facial recognition

TNW: This AI tool generates your creepy lookalikes to trick facial recognition. “If you’re worried about facial recognition firms or stalkers mining your online photos, a new tool called Anonymizer could help you escape their clutches. The app was created by Generated Media, a startup that provides AI-generated pictures to customers ranging from video game developers creating new characters to journalists protecting the identities of sources.”

Designed to Deceive: Do These People Look Real to You? (New York Times)

New York Times: Designed to Deceive: Do These People Look Real to You?. “There are now businesses that sell fake people. On the website Generated.Photos, you can buy a ‘unique, worry-free’ fake person for $2.99, or 1,000 people for $1,000. If you just need a couple of fake people — for characters in a video game, or to make your company website appear more diverse — you can get their photos for free on ThisPersonDoesNotExist.com. Adjust their likeness as needed; make them old or young or the ethnicity of your choosing. If you want your fake person animated, a company called Rosebud.AI can do that and can even make them talk.”

Brookings Institution: How to deal with AI-enabled disinformation

Brookings Institution: How to deal with AI-enabled disinformation. “Some forms of disinformation can do their damage in hours or even minutes. This kind of disinformation is easy to debunk given enough time, but extremely difficult to do so quickly enough to prevent it from inflicting damage. Elections are one example of the many domains where this can occur. Financial markets, which can be subject to short-term manipulation, are another example. Foreign affairs could be affected as rumors spread quickly around the world through digital platforms. Social movements can also be targeted through dissemination of false information designed to spur action or reaction among either supporters or opponents of a cause.”