Joe: You can use this new website to help you find your World Cup twin

Friday Fun from Joe: You can use this new website to help you find your World Cup twin. “A website built by Norwegian newspaper VG lets you find this the easy way. Just upload a photo of yourself – or your mates, or your dog, or a celebrity, or whoever – and it scans through all the players at the tournament, and pulls out your doppelgänger.” I was not struck by any great resemblance when I tried this, but it was amusing.

Futurism: IBM’s Debater AI Is Impressive, But It Won’t Conquer Humanity

Futurism: IBM’s Debater AI Is Impressive, But It Won’t Conquer Humanity. “We’re living in a strange time, when it’s increasingly difficult to distinguish a human from artificial intelligence. And, yes, it can be pretty uncanny. One recent example: Google’s demonstration of its Duplex technology, in which the software fooled an innocent (human) hairdresser into believing she was talking to a human on the phone. And now, IBM has taken things a step further by putting on a human-robot debate, setting its brand new Project Debater against Israeli professional debater Dan Zafrir.”

Project Maven wasn’t alone: Googlers reportedly boycotted another military tool (CNET)

CNET: Project Maven wasn’t alone: Googlers reportedly boycotted another military tool. “Google withdrew from Project Maven, a military initiative to use artificial intelligence to power targeted drone attacks, because of protests from its own employees. It turns out, it wasn’t the only government contract that elicited internal backlash.”

Oh Wow: Deep Learning AI Program Can Turn Standard 30FPS Footage Into Seamless High Quality Slow-Motion (Geekologie)

Geekologie: Oh Wow: Deep Learning AI Program Can Turn Standard 30FPS Footage Into Seamless High Quality Slow-Motion. “This is a video demonstration of a deep learning artificial intelligence program developed by graphics processor giant Nvidia that can turn standard 30FPS footage into beautiful, seamless 240FPS slow motion footage, 60FPS to 480FPS, and already slow motion footage four times slower.”

Here’s some phish-AI research: Machine-learning code crafts phishing URLs that dodge auto-detection (The Register)

The Register: Here’s some phish-AI research: Machine-learning code crafts phishing URLs that dodge auto-detection . “Blacklists and algorithms – intelligent or otherwise – can be used to automatically identify and block links to phishing pages. Humans should be able to spot that the web links are dodgy, but not everyone is so savvy. Using the Phishtank database, a group of computer scientists from Cyxtera Technologies, a cybersecurity biz based in Florida, USA, have built DeepPhish, which is machine-learning software that, allegedly, generates phishing URLs that beat these defense mechanisms.” Lovely.

Bloomberg: Google Is Training Machines to Predict When a Patient Will Die

Bloomberg: Google Is Training Machines to Predict When a Patient Will Die. “A woman with late-stage breast cancer came to a city hospital, fluids already flooding her lungs. She saw two doctors and got a radiology scan. The hospital’s computers read her vital signs and estimated a 9.3 percent chance she would die during her stay. Then came Google’s turn. An new type of algorithm created by the company read up on the woman — 175,639 data points — and rendered its assessment of her death risk: 19.9 percent. She passed away in a matter of days.”

TechCrunch: UK report warns DeepMind Health could gain ‘excessive monopoly power’

TechCrunch: UK report warns DeepMind Health could gain ‘excessive monopoly power’ . “The DeepMind Health Independent Reviewers’ 2018 report flags a series of risks and concerns, as they see it, including the potential for DeepMind Health to be able to ‘exert excessive monopoly power’ as a result of the data access and streaming infrastructure that’s bundled with provision of the Streams app — and which, contractually, positions DeepMind as the access-controlling intermediary between the structured health data and any other third parties that might, in the future, want to offer their own digital assistance solutions to the Trust.”