The Verge: This AI text adventure game has pretty much infinite possibilities

The Verge: This AI text adventure game has pretty much infinite possibilities. “AI Dungeon 2 isn’t exactly a polished game, but more of a passion project from developer Nick Walton. He’s harnessed the power of a state-of-the-art, open-source text generation system built by OpenAI and fed it a bunch of texts in the style of Choose Your Own Adventure books. The result is a text adventure where, to modify a cliché, the only limit is the AI’s imagination.” You can play it in your browser. It’s a bit of a slow load at the moment but I was able to have some fun with it.

Ars Technica: Archaeologists found 143 more images among the Nazca Lines

Ars Technica: Archaeologists found 143 more images among the Nazca Lines. “Archaeologists have rediscovered 143 more enormous drawings called geoglyphs etched on the rocky ground of Peru’s Nazca Desert, with one of the finds coming courtesy of a machine-learning algorithm. The new images emphasize how much ancient art lies on the 450 square kilometer (280 square mile) Nazca Desert and how much of it archaeologists still need to find and document.”

VentureBeat: The Masakhane project wants machine translation and AI to transform Africa

VentureBeat: The Masakhane project wants machine translation and AI to transform Africa. “English, Arabic, and French dialects can be found on parts of the African continent and are used across tribes, ethnic groups, and national borders, but none is native to Africa. Some estimates put the number of living languages on the continent at 2,000 or more. This can stand in the way of communication as well as commerce, and earlier this year such concerns led to the creation of the Masakhane open source project, an effort being undertaken by African technologists to translate African languages using neural machine translation.”

Ars Technica: How neural networks work—and why they’ve become a big business

Ars Technica: How neural networks work—and why they’ve become a big business. “Computer scientists have been experimenting with neural networks since the 1950s. But two big breakthroughs—one in 1986, the other in 2012—laid the foundation for today’s vast deep learning industry. The 2012 breakthrough—the deep learning revolution—was the discovery that we can get dramatically better performance out of neural networks with not just a few layers but with many. That discovery was made possible thanks to the growing amount of both data and computing power that had become available by 2012. This feature offers a primer on neural networks. We’ll explain what neural networks are, how they work, and where they came from. And we’ll explore why—despite many decades of previous research—neural networks have only really come into their own since 2012.”

AFP: China bans ‘fake news’ created with AI, bots

AFP: China bans ‘fake news’ created with AI, bots. “The regulation published Friday by China’s cyberspace authority said that both providers and users of online video news and audio services are ‘not allowed’ to use new technologies such as deep learning and virtual reality to create, distribute and broadcast ‘fake news.'”

Enterprise NXT: 4 ways AI is helping musicians—and the entire music industry

Enterprise NXT: 4 ways AI is helping musicians—and the entire music industry. “AI uses machine learning models to produce new patterns and correlations based on the data it was trained from. In the case of music, almost 100 million recorded songs exist. Many scores of scores provide a deep base of data that’s hard to beat, and plucky researchers have taken note: AI’s ability to learn and iterate on its knowledge can change the way musicians work. And now, it’s impacting the entire music industry.”