NIST: Streamlined NIST Tool Could Help Homeowners, Renters Reduce Airborne Exposure to COVID

NIST: Streamlined NIST Tool Could Help Homeowners, Renters Reduce Airborne Exposure to COVID. “Leveraging ventilation and filtration has been an underutilized strategy for many residents throughout the pandemic because of the technical know-how required to implement these strategies. To help more people use this approach effectively, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a simple interactive webpage featuring the new Virus Particle Exposure in Residences (ViPER) tool. With ViPER — and some basic knowledge about their homes — homeowners and renters can learn how much certain actions, such as upgrading air filters or opening a window, may lower their risk of exposure to particles in the air that could potentially transmit COVID-19.”

Slate: How Much Should You Worry About Air Conditioning and COVID-19?

Slate: How Much Should You Worry About Air Conditioning and COVID-19?. “It’s summer, and it’s hot. We’re on pace for, yet again, the hottest year in recorded history, and in the U.S., heat waves are scorching the South and Southwest. This would usually be a great time to close up those windows, pull the shades, and crank the air conditioning. But with the pandemic raging in many of the country’s hottest areas, the public is getting mixed messages about the role of air conditioning in spreading the coronavirus.”

The Harvard Gazette: Is air conditioning helping spread COVID in the South?

The Harvard Gazette: Is air conditioning helping spread COVID in the South?. “Drawing on insights from another deadly airborne disease, tuberculosis, a Harvard infectious disease expert suggested Friday that air conditioning use across the southern U.S. may be a factor in spiking COVID-19 cases and that ultraviolet lights long used to sterilize the air of TB bacteria could do the same for SARS-CoV-2.”

Inside Higher Ed: How Cold Is That Library? There’s a Google Doc for That

Inside Higher Ed: How Cold Is That Library? There’s a Google Doc for That. “What a difference preparation makes when it comes to doing research in Arctic-level air-conditioned academic libraries (or ones that are otherwise freezing — or not air-conditioned at all). Luckily, Megan L. Cook, assistant professor of English at Colby College, published a crowdsourced document called ‘How Cold Is that Library?’”