Automotive World: Jaguar Land Rover and Google measure Dublin air quality with all-electric I-PACE

Automotive World: Jaguar Land Rover and Google measure Dublin air quality with all-electric I-PACE. “Jaguar Land Rover has partnered with Google to integrate the all-electric Jaguar I-PACE with air quality measuring sensors and Street View mapping technology. The I-PACE is the first all-electric Google Street View vehicle and will be used to measure street-by-street air quality in Dublin including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and fine particles (PM2.5). It will also help update Google Maps.”

Impacts of coronavirus lockdowns: New study collects data on pollutants in the atmosphere (ScienceDaily)

ScienceDaily: Impacts of coronavirus lockdowns: New study collects data on pollutants in the atmosphere. “One consequence of the coronavirus pandemic has been global restrictions on mobility. This, in turn, has had an effect on pollution levels in the atmosphere. Researchers from across the world are using this unique opportunity to take measurements, collect data, and publish studies. An international team has now published a comprehensive review providing an overview of results up to September 2020.”

University of Massachusetts Amherst: UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute Launches New Tool to Track Air Pollution at Every U.S. School

University of Massachusetts Amherst: UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute Launches New Tool to Track Air Pollution at Every U.S. School. “Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) today unveiled a new interactive, web-based tool for tracking industrial toxic air pollution at every school in the United States. The tool, Air Toxics at School, reports toxicity-weighted concentrations of pollutants to show individual chronic human health risk from industrial toxic air pollutants at the schools’ locations.”

Washington State Department of Health: New interactive mapping tool can pinpoint pollution hotspots in effort to improve health equity

Washington State Department of Health: New interactive mapping tool can pinpoint pollution hotspots in effort to improve health equity. “The Washington State Department of Health (DOH), in collaboration with the University of Washington, announces new interactive mapping tools to help utilities improve environmental health equity as they transition to cleaner energy generation. These tools identify communities in Washington that are disproportionately impacted by fossil fuel pollution and vulnerable to climate change impacts so that these inequities can be addressed.”

Phys .org: Air pollution fell sharply during lockdown

Phys .org: Air pollution fell sharply during lockdown. “The far-reaching mobility restrictions at the beginning of the COVID pandemic in March 2020 created a unique situation for atmospheric sciences: ‘During the 2020 lockdown, we were able to directly investigate the actual effects of drastic traffic restrictions on the distribution of air pollutants and on the emission of climate gases,’ says Innsbruck atmospheric scientist Thomas Karl. With his team, he has now published a detailed analysis of air quality during the first lockdown in the city of Innsbruck, Austria, in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.”

Los Angeles Times: Another new coronavirus variant found across California, including L.A. County

Los Angeles Times: Another new coronavirus variant found across California, including L.A. County. “So many people have died in Los Angeles County that officials have temporarily suspended air-quality regulations that limit the number of cremations. Health officials and the L.A. County coroner requested the change because the current death rate is ‘more than double that of pre-pandemic years, leading to hospitals, funeral homes and crematoriums exceeding capacity, without the ability to process the backlog,’ the South Coast Air Quality Management District said Sunday.”

Washington Post: Covid-19 sparked a run on outdoor heaters and fire pits. Which is better for the planet?

Washington Post: Covid-19 sparked a run on outdoor heaters and fire pits. Which is better for the planet?. “Nelson Bryner has set a lot of things on fire in his career. Buses. Trash cans. Life-sized mannequins dressed in firefighting gear. A five-piece wooden dining set. As chief of the fire research division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Bryner spends many of his working days inside the division’s 20,000-square-foot laboratory, analyzing how much heat is generated and what byproducts are produced when various items are set ablaze. With coronavirus cases spiking and the mercury dropping, sparking a run on backyard heating devices, I knew Bryner could tell me what will happen when the fuel for those heaters is burned.”

Covid and pollution: intimately linked, compound threat (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Covid and pollution: intimately linked, compound threat. “Lockdowns may have temporarily cleared up the skies above big cities this year but experts warn that air pollution remains a Covid-19 threat multiplier, as well a health hazard that will far outlast the pandemic. As governments ordered temporary confinement measures to battle multiple virus waves, several studies have charted a marked increase in air quality in the US, China, and Europe.”

EurekAlert: 3D printing — a ‘dusty’ business?

EurekAlert: 3D printing — a ‘dusty’ business?. “To close the substantial gaps in our knowledge, scientists at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) are investigating which particles are released into the environment and what their properties are. Different substances are released into the air depending on the material used for printing. For example, BfR experts were able to detect particles of the widely-used plastic polylactic acid and copper crystals, among other substances.”

7 News Miami: Could some body bags burned during COVID pandemic pose a health risk? State set to notify human crematories of the problem

7 News Miami: Could some body bags burned during COVID pandemic pose a health risk? State set to notify human crematories of the problem. “In August, 7 Investigates documented thick black smoke billowing out of the crematory at Maspons Funeral Home in Little Havana. Since then, more black smoke rising into the air from two other South Florida crematories. An expert on air quality told us it can be a health risk.”

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Covid Plus Decades of Pollution Are a Nasty Combo for Detroit

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Covid Plus Decades of Pollution Are a Nasty Combo for Detroit. “For decades, Black Americans like [Theresa] Landrum, who’s in her 60s and describes herself as a 48217 environmental-justice activist, have fought to limit industrial emissions in their neighborhoods. More than two dozen industrial sites surround hers. People in 48217 live on average seven fewer years than in the country as a whole, and asthma hospitalization rates in the area are more than twice as high as those of Michigan and about five times higher than those of the U.S.”

Coronavirus: How pollution could make India’s Covid fight tougher (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: How pollution could make India’s Covid fight tougher. “A Harvard University study shows that an increase of only one microgram per cubic metre in PM 2.5 – dangerous tiny pollutants in the air – is associated with an 8% increase in the Covid-19 death rate. Another study by scientists at the UK’s University of Cambridge also found a link between the severity of Covid-19 infection and long-term exposure to air pollutants, including nitrogen oxides and ground-level ozone from car exhaust fumes or burning of fossil fuels.”