You wait ages for a mid-air collision spoofing attack and along come two at once: More boffins take a crack at hoodwinking TCAS (The Register)

The Register: You wait ages for a mid-air collision spoofing attack and along come two at once: More boffins take a crack at hoodwinking TCAS. “Traffic Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are used in aircraft to avoid hitting other aircraft in flight. And like many electronic systems, they weren’t designed for security. Five researchers in the US – Paul M. Berges, Timothy Graziano, and Ryan Gerdes from Virginia Tech, with Basavesh Ammanaghatta Shivakumar and Z. Berkay Celik from Purdue University – recently put TCAS to the test and found it wanting.”

BBC: Plane-maker Airbus to cut 15,000 jobs amid coronavirus fallout

BBC: Plane-maker Airbus to cut 15,000 jobs amid coronavirus fallout. “Aerospace giant Airbus says it plans to cut 15,000 jobs as it deals with the effects of the coronavirus crisis. It will cut 1,700 jobs in the UK, along with thousands more in Germany, Spain and elsewhere. The move is subject to talks with unions which have opposed compulsory redundancies.”

Washington Post: Airlines tried social distancing on board. For many, that experiment is ending.

Washington Post: Airlines tried social distancing on board. For many, that experiment is ending.. “After capping the number of people on flights since April, American Airlines announced Friday that its planes will likely be full in a few days. ‘As more people continue to travel, customers may notice that flights are booked to capacity starting July 1,’ the airline said in a news release. ‘American will continue to notify customers and allow them to move to more open flights when available, all without incurring any cost.'”

Skift: Google Is Providing Search Data to Air France, Lufthansa, Other Airlines Looking to Decide Which Routes to Restart

Skift: Google Is Providing Search Data to Air France, Lufthansa, Other Airlines Looking to Decide Which Routes to Restart. “Google is rolling out a new tool that provides airline partners with search data that carriers are using to help decide which routes to restart and when. Unlike existing data from Google for airlines about their own performance across Google products, the newly provided data provides a market-wide view of consumer intent based on flight searches regardless of airline.”

Coronavirus: Qantas to axe 6,000 jobs due to pandemic (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Qantas to axe 6,000 jobs due to pandemic. “Qantas will axe 6,000 jobs as part of its plans to survive the coronavirus pandemic, the airline says. The cuts equate to about a fifth of the airline’s workforce prior to the Covid-19 crisis. In March, it furloughed more than 80% of its staff. Australia’s national carrier said the collapse in global air travel had devastated revenues.”

Embry-Riddle: Random Boarding May Help Airlines Reduce Covid-19 Risks

Embry-Riddle: Random Boarding May Help Airlines Reduce Covid-19 Risks. “To reduce the spread of illness, some airlines have been keeping middle seats open, which is effective in reducing infection risk. Preliminary research based on computer simulations, however, suggests that random boarding of aircraft, rather than back-to-front boarding – a procedural response to the Covid-19 pandemic – may have an even greater impact, reducing exposure rates by about 50 percent.”

CNN: Airlines ban alcohol on planes in response to Covid-19

CNN: Airlines ban alcohol on planes in response to Covid-19. “Alcohol sales may have boomed during lockdown, but our return to air travel will be an altogether more sobering experience. Airlines including Easyjet and KLM in Europe, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines in the United States, and Asia’s Virgin Australia, are suspending all or part of their alcoholic drinks service in response to Covid-19.”

Slate: “You’re Starting to Get Vacation Travelers Who Are Just Willing to Risk It.”

Slate: “You’re Starting to Get Vacation Travelers Who Are Just Willing to Risk It.”. “Demand for flights is picking up. While the airline industry is still struggling to recover from the coronavirus pandemic, there have been reports of packed flights, filled primarily with vacation travelers defying warnings from public health experts. This development has been met by complicated feelings from those working in the industry: more flights means better job security, but also greater potential for exposure in the airports and staffing the planes. Slate spoke to a 34-year-old flight attendant with one of the ‘Big Three’ airlines (American, Delta, and United). He spoke on the condition of anonymity out of concern for his employment. His answers have been edited and condensed for clarity.”

New York Times: Airlines Say Everybody Onboard Must Wear a Mask. So Why Aren’t They?

New York Times: Airlines Say Everybody Onboard Must Wear a Mask. So Why Aren’t They?. “As airlines try to convince Americans to fly again, they have touted their policies for keeping passengers safe, including the requirement that everyone onboard a plane wear a mask. But travelers on recent flights said the rules are not being enforced. And flight attendants said they have been told not to confront passengers who opt to not follow them.”

Coronavirus: Call for action over refunds for cancelled flights (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Call for action over refunds for cancelled flights. “Like many others across the UK, Emily Liddle and George Ridley are struggling to secure a refund for a holiday which was cancelled amid the coronavirus pandemic. The couple, who lived in Edinburgh for years, were due to fly to Japan in March and spend three months travelling around Asia. They say they are about £2,000 out of pocket for flights from two airlines who have refused to refund in cash, instead offering vouchers for future flights.”

Dallas News: A Dallas blogger’s images of parked planes show just how far the airline industry has fallen

Dallas News: A Dallas blogger’s images of parked planes show just how far the airline industry has fallen. “Andy Luten usually takes pictures of planes in the air, taking off or landing. But in the depths of the COVID-19 downturn, the 37-year-old financial software consultant in Dallas wanted to put his hobby to work showing planes in their current state — on the ground. So Luten packed his Tesla and drove from Dallas to airports as close as DFW and Fort Worth Alliance and as far away as Arizona to document how the COVID-19 pandemic has thrashed airlines. He published the images this week on his blog, where he usually posts vacation pics, rocket launch photos and even shots from Dallas Mavericks games.”

Mother Jones: Delta Tells Sick Flight Attendants: “Do Not Post” on Social Media or Notify Fellow Crew

Mother Jones: Delta Tells Sick Flight Attendants: “Do Not Post” on Social Media or Notify Fellow Crew. “Delta Air Lines has directed flight attendants who test positive for the coronavirus to ‘refrain from notifying’ fellow crew members or posting about their health on social media, according to an email HuffPost reviewed. The email, sent Thursday afternoon to more than 25,000 flight attendants, stated that Delta management will ‘follow an established process’ to alert co-workers who recently came in contact with flight attendants who ‘are symptomatic or diagnosed with COVID-19,’ the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus. “

Exclusive: Coronavirus-hit airlines in push for divisive route subsidies (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Coronavirus-hit airlines in push for divisive route subsidies. “Major airlines are seeking operating subsidies for key routes once coronavirus restrictions are lifted, a leaked lobbying document shows, stoking tensions with some low-cost carriers that are less likely to benefit from the additional funds.”

Lifehacker: These Airlines Will Let You Change Your Flight for Free Because of Coronavirus

Lifehacker: These Airlines Will Let You Change Your Flight for Free Because of Coronavirus. “If you have a flight coming up in the next few weeks that you’re starting to get nervous about, here’s a rundown on what each airline’s policy on changes and cancellations currently is. Also, keep in mind that when an airline waives a change fee, it’s waiving the additional charge you would traditionally have had to pay to change that ticket, you’re still going to be responsible for the change in the cost of airfare between your old and new ticket, so it’s in your best interest to make a change earlier rather than later.”

The Guardian: New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology

The Guardian: New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology. “Activist groups Fight for the Future, Demand Progress and Credo on Wednesday unveiled a new website… which shows users what airlines use facial recognition to verify the identity of passengers before boarding. The site also helps customers to directly book flights with airlines that don’t use facial recognition technologies.”