Alaska Department of Public Safety: Trooper Recruitment Advertisement Censored by Google/YouTube

Alaska Department of Public Safety: Trooper Recruitment Advertisement Censored by Google/YouTube. “This week, the Department of Public Safety (DPS) was notified that Google/YouTube canceled authorization of pay-per-click advertisement of a recently, nationally distributed recruitment video advertisement for the Alaska State Troopers. The action was taken as it was interpreted to be political and potentially an election advertisement because of Governor Mike Dunleavy’s comments supporting law enforcement and encouraging people to apply to the DPS ranks.”

Courthouse News Service: Alaska Native Corporations Owed Share of Covid-19 Emergency Aid, Judge Rules

Courthouse News Service: Alaska Native Corporations Owed Share of Covid-19 Emergency Aid, Judge Rules. “Corporations operating for-profit and providing health care to Alaskan Natives deserve a share of the $8 billion Congress set aside for tribal governments during the coronavirus pandemic, a federal judge in Washington ruled Friday. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta had originally blocked the Treasury Department from sending money out to the Alaska Native Corporations after twelve tribes fired off lawsuits arguing the private organizations do not operate as tribal governments.”

USGS: New Land Cover Maps Depict 15 Years of Alaska Change

USGS: New Land Cover Maps Depict 15 Years of Alaska Change. “The Alaska data amount to the most up-to-date and comprehensive land cover map ever produced for the largest U.S. state in the Union, offering critical insight into some of North America’s most rapidly- and dramatically-changing landscapes…. As with NLCD 2016’s CONUS data products, the Alaska land cover maps depict 15 years of change, from 2001-2016.”

Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos

Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos. “To assist Alutiiq families with the preservation of their paper photographs the Alutiiq Museum is leading a Community Photo Archive project. In the coming months, museum staff members will work with tribal councils and community members to identify Alutiiq family photos, scan the images, and create digital copies to their owners. Staff members will invite families to deposit digital copies with the museum, but sharing is not a requirement for participation. This one-year effort is funded by the US Bureau of Indian Affairs with assistance from the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak.”

KTVA: Bill would make state finances accessible online

KTVA: Bill would make state finances accessible online. “New legislation introduced in Juneau could make state finances more transparent for the public by establishing an online checkbook. Senate Bill 180, sponsored by Sen. Bill Wielechowski, D-Anchorage, would establish a searchable online database for all the state expenditures and revenue.”

University of Alaska Fairbanks: New tsunami map tool empowers Alaskans to plan for the worst

University of Alaska Fairbanks: New tsunami map tool empowers Alaskans to plan for the worst. “The Alaska Earthquake Center’s new Alaska Tsunami Hazard Map Tool will help people plan for the worst. The tool, which went live this month, is an online map portal that displays potential tsunami hazard zones for settlements across Alaska.”

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project. “IN AUGUST, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recognized forty Native leaders around the country for their ’40 Under 40 Awards,’ including Dr. Holly Miowak Guise, an Inupiaq woman raised in Anchorage and Unalakleet. The center recognizes Indigenous leaders across the U.S. for making significant impacts in business or their community. KNOM’s Emily Hofstaedter spoke with Dr. Guise about how she’s working to bring the history of Alaska Natives in World War II to a wider audience.” This is an audio interview but it has a lot of excerpts.

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research. “With a $56,462 grant from the National Science Foundation (award #1360839), the Alutiiq Museum will extend its Naken–Natmen (Where From–Where To) language project for an additional year. First funded in 2014, the multi-year project improved access to Alutiiq language resources by developing an online archive of Alutiiq recordings, creating an Alutiiq speaker registry, and planning future language documentation projects. Now, a supplemental grant will allow the museum to study rare examples of written Alutiiq preserved in historic texts.”

Manager’s Corner: KYUK Receives Funding To Digitize Historic Footage (KYUK)

KYUK: Manager’s Corner: KYUK Receives Funding To Digitize Historic Footage. “KYUK has documented life in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta since 1971, resulting in a massive collection of audio and video tapes – over 12,000 items! From dance festivals in Mountain Village to traditional kayak building in Bethel, KYUK has been there capturing it all. Because we no longer have the antiquated machines needed to play the recordings back, much of the content has been impossible to access until now. With this funding, KYUK will digitize roughly 2,000 tapes over the next two years and put them online for all to enjoy.”

KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake

KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake. “The 1964 earthquake was documented in newspaper headlines, letters and photographs shot on film. After the Nov. 30 quake, historians are using words and images from social media to document the disaster. Aaron Leggett, a curator with the Anchorage Museum, said staff started collecting online items for their archive an hour after the quake hit.”

Juneau Empire: Alaska community data available on new interactive online portal

Juneau Empire: Alaska community data available on new interactive online portal. “Ever wondered what the Alaska Native names for all the communities in Alaska were? Or how many people lived in each community? Searching for such data just became way easier in an interactive portal. The Division of Community and Regional Affairs unveiled a new website this week, with the goal of making demographic information about communities across Alaska more easily accessible to the average person.”

Eye on the Arctic: Alaskan Inuit dialect added to Facebook’s Translate app

Eye on the Arctic: Alaskan Inuit dialect added to Facebook’s Translate app. “Facebook added Inupiaq, an Alaskan Inuit dialect, as a language option thanks to a grassroots project started by an Alaskan man. Myles Creed is from the Inupiaq community of Kotzebue, Alaska. He’s a PhD student studying linguistics at the University of Victoria and is involved with Inupiaq language revitalization in Alaska.”

Juneau Empire: Hoonah goes digital, launches trove of historic photos

Juneau Empire: Hoonah goes digital, launches trove of historic photos. “HHF [Huna Heritage Foundation] has been collecting photographs of historical and cultural relevance for the city of Hoonah and the Huna Tlingit people since its inception in the 1990s. Subject matter ranges from the arts, people, and places to activities like logging, fishing and specific events like the Hoonah fire of 1944. Now, through a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the organization is working to bring its collection online for easy access by the public.”