Arizona State University: ASU collection of rare, historically significant books made accessible to the public online

Arizona State University: ASU collection of rare, historically significant books made accessible to the public online. “‘The Federalist Papers,’ a collection of short essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay in 1788, is one of the most well-known pro-Constitution writings. A first edition printing of this book, along with 23 other rare books and manuscripts related to significant figures, moments, ideas, debates and movements from American history, can be explored through Arizona State University’s Civic Classics Collection.”

Automated Authorship Verification: Did We Really Write Those Blogs We Said We Wrote? (Wolfram Blog)

Wolfram Blog: Automated Authorship Verification: Did We Really Write Those Blogs We Said We Wrote?. “Several Months Ago… I wrote a blog post about the disputed Federalist Papers. These were the 12 essays (out of a total of 85) with authorship claimed by both Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Ever since the landmark statistical study by Mosteller and Wallace published in 1963, the consensus opinion has been that all 12 were written by Madison (the Adair article of 1944, which also takes this position, discusses the long history of competing authorship claims for these essays). The field of work that gave rise to the methods used often goes by the name of ‘stylometry,’ and it lies behind most methods for determining authorship from text alone (that is to say, in the absence of other information such as a physical typewritten or handwritten note). In the case of the disputed essays, the pool size, at just two, is as small as can be. Even so, these essays have been regarded as difficult for authorship attribution due to many statistical similarities in style shared by Hamilton and Madison.”

Technology at the Library: Long-Hidden Text Is Uncovered in Alexander Hamilton Letter (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Technology at the Library: Long-Hidden Text Is Uncovered in Alexander Hamilton Letter. “When the Library of Congress recently digitized the Alexander Hamilton Papers, that letter, unedited, with its 14 obliterated lines, became visible to all for the first time. However, the lines were still unreadable. To find out what lay beneath the scratchings-out, Fenella France, chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division, and preservation staff Meghan Wilson and Chris Bolser used hyperspectral imaging. A noninvasive analysis that employs light at different wavelengths to capture information not visible to the eye, hyperspectral imaging can determine the composition of inks and pigments, track changes in documents over time and reveal faded, erased or covered writing.”

I Saved Every Letter You Wrote Me: The Library of Congress Digitizes Hamilton (NPR)

NPR: I Saved Every Letter You Wrote Me: The Library of Congress Digitizes Hamilton. “If you’ve seen the hit musical Hamilton — or even if you’ve only heard about it — you might want to know more about the founding father who was the United States’ first Secretary of the Treasury. And if so, the Library of Congress just made it easier to go right to the source. Before, if you wanted to see — for example — Alexander Hamilton’s letters to his wife, you had to travel to the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and even then, you’d have to view them on microfilm. Now, Julie Miller, the Library’s curator of Early American Manuscripts, says the collection has been digitized. “