ZDNet: You’re dating everyone: How algorithms will put us all in our place(s)

ZDNet: You’re dating everyone: How algorithms will put us all in our place(s). “Do you know what I hate most about social networking sites like Facebook? The people. They ruin everything. No, seriously. I used to love using Facebook, although I can’t exactly remember the last time when my enjoyment significantly outweighed my rage.”

CNET: Facebook’s Sri Lanka crisis page let Islamophobic post get top billing

CNET: Facebook’s Sri Lanka crisis page let Islamophobic post get top billing. “In times of tragedy, Facebook points to its Crisis Response pages as a way to help people in trouble. But the Crisis Response feature isn’t safe from Facebook’s algorithms, which promoted an Islamophobic post as the top video for people checking for information in the aftermath of Sunday’s explosions in Sri Lanka.”

CNN: How Twitter’s algorithm is amplifying extreme political rhetoric

CNN: How Twitter’s algorithm is amplifying extreme political rhetoric. “Imagine opening up the Twitter app on your phone and scrolling through your feed. Suddenly, you come across a hyper-partisan tweet calling Hillary Clinton the ‘godmother of ISIS.’ It’s from a user you do not follow, and it’s not in your feed by virtue of a retweet from a user you do follow. So how did it get there?”

Nieman Lab: Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you

Nieman Lab: Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you. “According to a new survey by the Knight Foundation and Gallup, American adults feel negatively about major Internet companies tailoring information to them individually, acting as content arbitrators that enhances bias, and not being transparent about their methods. (Note: Knight has provided support to Nieman Lab in the past.) Those major internet companies in this context are Google, Yahoo, Facebook, and Twitter (surprise).”

MIT Technology Review: An ex-Google engineer is scraping YouTube to pop our filter bubbles

MIT Technology Review: An ex-Google engineer is scraping YouTube to pop our filter bubbles. “YouTube—whose more than a billion users watch over a billion hours per day—shows us some data, like how many times a video has been viewed, liked, or disliked. But it hides more granular details about each video, like how often the site recommended it to other people. Without the full picture, it can be hard to know why, exactly, its algorithm is steering you in a certain direction. Guillaume Chaslot, a computer programmer who spent some time working on recommendations at YouTube and on display advertising at its parent company, Google, thinks this is a problem, and he’s fighting to bring more transparency to the ways videos are recommended.”

Wired: Pinterest’s New Feature Takes The Algorithm Out Of Your Feed

Wired: Pinterest’s New Feature Takes The Algorithm Out Of Your Feed. “The beauty of a site like Pinterest lies in how little you have to do to use it. Choose a few things you’re interested in—vegan food, knitting, travel—then kick back and enjoy scrolling through algorithmically generated collections of images…. But sometimes, you want to see what you signed up to see, and not what the machines think you might like. So today, Pinterest is introducing a new feed populated only by the people and boards you follow.”