Lifehacker: How To Outsmart Algorithms And Take Control Of Your Information Diet

Lifehacker: How To Outsmart Algorithms And Take Control Of Your Information Diet. This is like a roundup of other useful Lifehacker articles, but it’s still good. “‘Certain algorithms,’ says Tim Cook, ‘pull you toward the things you already know, believe or like, and they push away everything else. Push back.’ In a commencement speech to Tulane University, the Apple CEO tells graduates to take charge of their information diet. And much as we want to sneer at the irony of a phone maker telling us to beware of algorithms, we have to admit that Apple’s Screen Time app is one good tool for improving your tech habits. Here are the best posts we’ve already written on pushing back against the algorithms.”

Algorithmic bias detection and mitigation: Best practices and policies to reduce consumer harms (Brookings)

Brookings: Algorithmic bias detection and mitigation: Best practices and policies to reduce consumer harms. “In the pre-algorithm world, humans and organizations made decisions in hiring, advertising, criminal sentencing, and lending. These decisions were often governed by federal, state, and local laws that regulated the decision-making processes in terms of fairness, transparency, and equity. Today, some of these decisions are entirely made or influenced by machines whose scale and statistical rigor promise unprecedented efficiencies.”

Ars Technica: Microsoft open sources algorithm that gives Bing some of its smarts

Ars Technica: Microsoft open sources algorithm that gives Bing some of its smarts. “Microsoft has released today the SPTAG [Space Partition Tree and Graph] algorithm as MIT-licensed open source on GitHub. This code is proven and production-grade, used to answer questions in Bing. Developers can use this algorithm to search their own sets of vectors and do so quickly: a single machine can handle 250 million vectors and answer 1,000 queries per second. There are some samples and explanations in Microsoft’s AI Lab, and Azure will have a service using the same algorithms.”

Harvard Business Review: All the Ways Hiring Algorithms Can Introduce Bias

Harvard Business Review: All the Ways Hiring Algorithms Can Introduce Bias. “Our analysis of predictive tools across the hiring process helps to clarify just what ‘hiring algorithms’ do, and where and how bias can enter into the process. Unfortunately, we found that most hiring algorithms will drift toward bias by default. While their potential to help reduce interpersonal bias shouldn’t be discounted, only tools that proactively tackle deeper disparities will offer any hope that predictive technology can help promote equity, rather than erode it.”

ZDNet: You’re dating everyone: How algorithms will put us all in our place(s)

ZDNet: You’re dating everyone: How algorithms will put us all in our place(s). “Do you know what I hate most about social networking sites like Facebook? The people. They ruin everything. No, seriously. I used to love using Facebook, although I can’t exactly remember the last time when my enjoyment significantly outweighed my rage.”

BBC: ‘Extremist’ Google algorithms concern ex-police chief

BBC: ‘Extremist’ Google algorithms concern ex-police chief. “A former police chief has called on Google to amend its technology to help stop the spread of terrorist material. Ex-Met Police assistant commissioner Sir Mark Rowley says it is a disgrace a jailed radical preacher ranks top for search term ‘British Muslim spokesman’.”

The Conversation: Google’s algorithms discriminate against women and people of colour

The Conversation: Google’s algorithms discriminate against women and people of colour. “At the start of Black History Month 2019, Google designed its daily-changing homepage logo to include an image of African-American activist Sojourner Truth, the great 19th-century abolitionist and women’s rights activist. But what would Truth say about Google’s continual lack of care and respect toward people of colour? While bringing more attention to Sojourner Truth is venerable, Google can do better. As a professor and researcher of digital cultures, I have found that a lack of care and investment by tech companies towards users who are not white and male allows racism and sexism to creep into search engines, social networks and other algorithmic technologies.”