FedScoop: USPTO chief information officer most excited about new search algorithms

FedScoop: USPTO chief information officer most excited about new search algorithms . “New search algorithms for relevant prior art most excite the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s CIO right now. USPTO created the machine-learning algorithms to increase the speed at which patents are examined by importing relevant prior art — all information on its claim of originality — into pending applications sent to art units, said Jamie Holcombe.”

Report: Instagram’s algorithm pushes certain users to COVID-19 misinformation (UPI)

UPI: Report: Instagram’s algorithm pushes certain users to COVID-19 misinformation. “Instagram’s algorithm recommended new users following COVID-19 misinformation to more of the same amid the pandemic, a report said Tuesday. The Center For Countering Digital Hate, a nonprofit company with offices in Britain and Washington, D.C., founded in 2018 by Imran Ahmed, published the report, on Tuesday, titled ‘Malgorithm.’”

Stanford: Algorithmic approaches for assessing pollution reduction policies can reveal shifts in environmental protection of minority communities, according to Stanford researchers

Stanford: Algorithmic approaches for assessing pollution reduction policies can reveal shifts in environmental protection of minority communities, according to Stanford researchers. “Applying machine learning to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiative reveals how key design elements determine what communities bear the burden of pollution. The approach could help ensure fairness and accountability in machine learning used by government regulators.”

Chicago Booth Review: Law and order and data

Chicago Booth Review: Law and order and data. “Algorithms are already being used in criminal-justice applications in many places, helping decide where police departments should send officers for patrol, as well as which defendants should be released on bail and how judges should hand out sentences. Research is exploring the potential benefits and dangers of these tools, highlighting where they can go wrong and how they can be prevented from becoming a new source of inequality. The findings of these studies prompt some important questions such as: Should artificial intelligence play some role in policing and the courts? If so, what role should it play? The answers, it appears, depend in large part on small details.”

New York Times: Where Do Vaccine Doses Go, and Who Gets Them? The Algorithms Decide

New York Times: Where Do Vaccine Doses Go, and Who Gets Them? The Algorithms Decide. “The algorithms are intended to speed Covid-19 shots from pharmaceutical plants to people’s arms. The formulas generally follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending that frontline health care workers, nursing home residents, senior citizens and those with major health risks be given priority for the vaccines. Yet federal agencies, states, local health departments and medical centers have each developed different allocation formulas, based on a variety of ethical and political considerations. The result: Americans are experiencing wide disparities in vaccine access.”

HealthImaging: New database of FDA-cleared algorithms helps radiologists quickly navigate complex AI environment

HealthImaging: New database of FDA-cleared algorithms helps radiologists quickly navigate complex AI environment. “The American College of Radiology on Monday announced a new, searchable database of federally cleared algorithms to help radiologists navigate the complex artificial intelligence environment. The ACR Data Science Institute’s catalog includes 111 class 2 medical imaging AI algorithms cleared by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Radiologists can search for tools according to company, subspeciality, body area, modality, and clearance date to find what may best fit their clinical needs.”

TNW: Study shows how AI exacerbates recruitment bias against women

TNW: Study shows how AI exacerbates recruitment bias against women. “A new study from the University of Melbourne has demonstrated how hiring algorithms can amplify human gender biases against women. Researchers from the University of Melbourne gave 40 recruiters real-life resumés for jobs at UniBank, which funded the study. The resumés were for roles as a data analyst, finance officer, and recruitment officer, which Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows are respectively male-dominated, gender-balanced, and female-dominated positions.”

“There are still many questions that are not answered” – Nicolas Kayser-Bril on investigating algorithmic discrimination on Facebook (Online Journalism Blog)

Online Journalism Blog: “There are still many questions that are not answered” – Nicolas Kayser-Bril on investigating algorithmic discrimination on Facebook. “In a special guest post for OJB, Vanessa Fillis speaks to AlgorithmWatch’s Nicolas Kayser-Bril about his work on how online platforms optimise ad delivery, including his recent story on how Facebook draws on gender stereotypes.”

ScienceBlog: When Algorithms Compete, Who Wins?

ScienceBlog: When Algorithms Compete, Who Wins?. “James Zou, Stanford assistant professor of biomedical data science and an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, says that as algorithms compete for clicks and the associated user data, they become more specialized for subpopulations that gravitate to their sites. And that, he finds in a new paper with graduate student Antonio Ginart and undergraduate Eva Zhang, can have serious implications for both companies and consumers.”

Vice: How to Game Spotify and Instagram’s Algorithms to Help Artists

Vice: How to Game Spotify and Instagram’s Algorithms to Help Artists. “Now that in-person live music is no longer a reality, there are few ways to directly support musicians. You can subscribe to artist Patreons and donate through links on Spotify artist pages, but most importantly, you should be buying music and merch, especially through Bandcamp, during their monthly Bandcamp Friday 100 percent commission days. These are necessary and important steps to take to ensure touring artists can weather the pandemic. But there are also ways to give them a boost that don’t require spending any money: Simply follow the artists you like and save their songs on your streaming platform.”

Mother Jones: Facebook Manipulated the News You See to Appease Republicans, Insiders Say

Mother Jones: Facebook Manipulated the News You See to Appease Republicans, Insiders Say. “To be perfectly clear: Facebook used its monopolistic power to boost and suppress specific publishers’ content—the essence of every Big Brother fear about the platforms, and something Facebook and other companies have been strenuously denying for years. It’s also, ironically, what conservatives have consistently accused Facebook of doing to them, with the perverse but entirely intended effect of causing it to bend over backward for them instead.”

NiemanLab: Is Facebook too big to know? The Markup has a plan (and a browser) to wrap its arms around it

NiemanLab: Is Facebook too big to know? The Markup has a plan (and a browser) to wrap its arms around it. “The Citizen Browser Project will pay 1,200 Americans to let The Markup monitor the choices that tech company algorithms are making for them. ‘What are they choosing to amplify? And what are they choosing not to amplify?’”

The Conversation: Do social media algorithms erode our ability to make decisions freely? The jury is out

The Conversation: Do social media algorithms erode our ability to make decisions freely? The jury is out . “Social media algorithms, artificial intelligence, and our own genetics are among the factors influencing us beyond our awareness. This raises an ancient question: do we have control over our own lives? This article is part of The Conversation’s series on the science of free will.”

MIT Technology Review: Why kids need special protection from AI’s influence

MIT Technology Review: Why kids need special protection from AI’s influence. “Algorithms are also increasingly used to determine what their education is like, whether they’ll receive health care, and even whether their parents are deemed fit to care for them. Sometimes this can have devastating effects: this past summer, for example, thousands of students lost their university admissions after algorithms—used in lieu of pandemic-canceled standardized tests—inaccurately predicted their academic performance. Children, in other words, are often at the forefront when it comes to using and being used by AI, and that can leave them in a position to get hurt.”