WIRED: How to Stop Robots From Becoming Racist

WIRED: How to Stop Robots From Becoming Racist. “The doll test was invented to better understand the evil consequences of separate and unequal treatment on the self-esteem of Black children in the United States. Lawyers from the NAACP used the results to successfully argue in favor of the desegregation of US schools. Now AI researchers say robots may need to undergo similar tests to ensure they treat all people fairly.”

CNET: Oracle Starts Auditing TikTok’s Algorithms Amid Security Concerns

CNET: Oracle Starts Auditing TikTok’s Algorithms Amid Security Concerns. “Axios, citing an unnamed source, reported Tuesday that Oracle began the review last week and that the company will help ensure that Chinese authorities aren’t manipulating TikTok’s algorithms. TikTok’s algorithms help determine what videos the platform recommends to its more than 1 billion monthly active users. In June, TikTok announced it routed all US user traffic to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. “

Stanford Engineering: How to design algorithms with fairness in mind

Stanford Engineering: How to design algorithms with fairness in mind. “In this episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything, computer science professor Omer Reingold explains how we can create definitions of fairness that can be incorporated into computer algorithms. Reingold and host, bioengineer Russ Altman, also discuss how flawed historic data may result in algorithms making unfair decisions and how a technique called multi-group fairness can improve health predictions for individuals.” Audio link and YouTube video with excellent captions.

Google Algorithms & Updates Focused On User Experience: A Timeline (Search Engine Journal)

Search Engine Journal: Google Algorithms & Updates Focused On User Experience: A Timeline. “In this article, I examine a combination of some (not all) Google updates and technological advancements that significantly reflect the search engine’s focus on the human user and their experiences online – from Panda in 2011 through to Page and Product Experience in 2021 and 2022.”

UWM Report: Automated hiring systems could be making the worker shortage worse

UWM Report: Automated hiring systems could be making the worker shortage worse. “There’s a worker shortage in the United States. As the country recovers from the pandemic, companies are trying to bring their employees back into the workplace but are finding that many of those employees are quitting – a so-called ‘Great Resignation.’ There are many factors behind this worker shortage, but Noelle Chesley thinks there might be one going overlooked: the use of automated hiring systems to fill those open positions.”

The Miami Student: Facebook algorithm may favor the Republican party, study co-authored by Miami University professors finds

The Miami Student: Facebook algorithm may favor the Republican party, study co-authored by Miami University professors finds . “New research from Miami University has shown that a change in the Facebook algorithm may have increased the visibility of posts from local Republican parties. Professors from Miami and Wright State University (WSU) found that, despite posting more, Democratic parties received significantly less interaction on their posts.”

Engadget: Oregon is shutting down its controversial child welfare AI in June

Engadget: Oregon is shutting down its controversial child welfare AI in June. “A number of states across the country have already implemented, or are considering, similar algorithms within their child welfare agencies. But as with Northpointe’s COMPAS before them, their implementation have raised concerns about the transparency and reliability of the process as well as their clear tendency towards racial bias. However, the Allegheny developers did note that their tool was just that and was never intended to operate on its own without direct human oversight.”

New York Times: Accused of Cheating by an Algorithm, and a Professor She Had Never Met

New York Times: Accused of Cheating by an Algorithm, and a Professor She Had Never Met. “A Florida teenager taking a biology class at a community college got an upsetting note this year. A start-up called Honorlock had flagged her as acting suspiciously during an exam in February. She was, she said in an email to The New York Times, a Black woman who had been ‘wrongfully accused of academic dishonesty by an algorithm.’ What happened, however, was more complicated than a simple algorithmic mistake. It involved several humans, academic bureaucracy and an automated facial detection tool from Amazon called Rekognition.”

Yahoo Finance: This ‘rater’ gets paid $10 an hour to teach Google’s algorithm — and he’s not alone

Yahoo Finance: This ‘rater’ gets paid $10 an hour to teach Google’s algorithm — and he’s not alone. “Google Search may feel like magic, but the engine’s efficacy relies on hourly employees who work for a subcontractor. In the internet age, these are, quite literally, the people who help you find the right pair of pants.”

Search Engine Roundtable: Possible Google Search Algorithm Update May 1st With Rumbles All Week

Search Engine Roundtable: Possible Google Search Algorithm Update May 1st With Rumbles All Week. “For the past week, I have been seeing a different pattern with a possible Google search ranking algorithm update. The forums and SEO discussion around a possible Google update was brewing a good part of last week but the automated tracking tools, most of them, didn’t really pick up signs of a Google update.”

Social media app Koo makes algorithms public; pledges commitment to transparency, neutrality (PTI)

PTI: Social media app Koo makes algorithms public; pledges commitment to transparency, neutrality. “Twitter-rival Koo on Wednesday said it has become the first significant social media platform to publish the philosophy and workings behind its core algorithms, thereby empowering users to understand why they are seeing the content that they do. These algorithms were made public on Koo’s website, according to a statement.”

Times of Israel: ADL develops algorithm to track antisemitism on social media

Times of Israel: ADL develops algorithm to track antisemitism on social media. “When it comes to antisemitism on social media, the algorithms governing the major platforms shoulder some of the blame for their reach. But the Anti-Defamation League hopes to fight the spread — by creating an algorithm of its own. The Jewish civil rights group announced Tuesday that it has built a system called the Online Hate Index, describing it as the first tool ever developed to measure antisemitism on social media platforms. The program can sift through millions of posts quickly to detect antisemitic comments and aid in their removal.”

Mashable: I got a dog. My online life changed overnight.

Mashable: I got a dog. My online life changed overnight. . “The instant I got my dog — a lovely, adorable puppy named Henry — my entire online life changed. My TikTok For You Page (FYP) was suddenly dog video after dog video. My Instagram ads were entirely for dog-related products. Twitter was…still a cesspool of my own choosing, so at least there was that. But life pre-Henry was totally different online. I had interests. I jogged, I air fried, I liked NBA basketball, I spent way too much time thinking about grilling. These interests were all displaced by the algorithms practically screaming ‘YOU HAVE A DOG!’”

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?. “From the 1990s onwards, the financial industry has been built on variations of the diffusion equation, attributed to a variety of mathematicians including Einstein. Professional gamblers make use of logistic regression, developed by the Oxford statistician Sir David Cox in the 50s, to ensure they win at the expense of those punters who are less maths-savvy. There is good reason to expect that there are more billion-dollar equations out there: generations-old mathematical theorems with the potential for new applications. The question is where to look for the next one.”