TechCrunch: Amazon launches CodeWhisperer, a GitHub Copilot-like AI pair programming tool

TechCrunch: Amazon launches CodeWhisperer, a GitHub Copilot-like AI pair programming tool. “At its re:Mars conference, Amazon today announced the launch of CodeWhisperer, an AI pair programming tool similar to GitHub’s Copilot that can autocomplete entire functions based on only a comment or a few keystrokes. The company trained the system, which currently supports Java, JavaScript and Python, on billions of lines of publicly available open source code and its own codebase, as well as publicly available documentation and code on public forums.”

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global. “The Australian National University’s (ANU) ANU Quantum Numbers (AQN) is the world’s most popular and powerful online random number generator. It uses quantum technology to generate true random numbers at high speed and in real time by measuring the quantum fluctuations of the vacuum. From today, AQN will be available on AWS Marketplace, an online software store that helps customers find, buy, and use software that runs on Amazon Web Services (AWS), an Amazon.com company.”

Engadget: Amazon disables ISIS propaganda website using AWS to host content

Engadget: Amazon disables ISIS propaganda website using AWS to host content. “The Islamic State’s propaganda arm used Amazon Web Services to host content promoting extremism, according to The Washington Post. Nida-e-Haqq, the group’s media arm, posted messages on the website in the Urdu language, including ones celebrating the recent suicide bombing in Kabul that killed 170 people. Since Amazon’s policy bars clients from using its services to incite violence and terror, the company pulled the website after The Post alerted it to its existence.”

Exclusive: Amazon is helping Formula 1 preserve its history with colossal video archive (TechRadar)

TechRadar: Exclusive: Amazon is helping Formula 1 preserve its history with colossal video archive. “Amazon Web Services and Formula 1 are working together to migrate decades of race footage to a centralized database in the cloud, the pair have revealed. The archive migration project is an extension of an existing partnership between the two organizations, the main objective of which is to create superior experiences for fans on race days by utilizing the latest cloud analytics technologies.”

AWS (Amazon): AWS launches machine learning enabled search capabilities for COVID-19 dataset

AWS (Amazon): AWS launches machine learning enabled search capabilities for COVID-19 dataset. “As the world grapples with COVID-19, researchers and scientists are united in an effort to understand the disease and find ways to detect and treat infections as quickly as possible. Today, Amazon Web Services (AWS) launched CORD-19 Search, a new search website powered by machine learning that can help researchers quickly and easily search tens of thousands of research papers and documents using natural language questions.”

‘Magic: The Gathering’ game maker exposed 452,000 players’ account data (TechCrunch)

TechCrunch: ‘Magic: The Gathering’ game maker exposed 452,000 players’ account data. “The maker of Magic: The Gathering has confirmed that a security lapse exposed the data on hundreds of thousands of game players. The game’s developer, the Washington-based Wizards of the Coast, left a database backup file in a public Amazon Web Services storage bucket. But there was no password on the storage bucket, allowing anyone to access the files inside.”

TechCrunch: Hundreds of exposed Amazon cloud backups found leaking sensitive data

TechCrunch: Hundreds of exposed Amazon cloud backups found leaking sensitive data. “How safe are your secrets? If you used Amazon’s Elastic Block Storage snapshots, you might want to check your settings. New research just presented at the Def Con security conference reveals how companies, startups and governments are inadvertently leaking their own files from the cloud.”

BusinessWire: AWS Announces General Availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive—the Lowest Cost Storage in the Cloud (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: AWS Announces General Availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive—the Lowest Cost Storage in the Cloud (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Amazon Web Services, Inc. (AWS), an Amazon.com company (NASDAQ: AMZN), announced the general availability of Amazon S3 Glacier Deep Archive, a new storage class that provides secure, durable object storage for long-term retention of data that is rarely accessed. At just $0.00099 per GB-month (less than one-tenth of one cent, or $1 per TB-month), S3 Glacier Deep Archive offers the lowest cost storage in the cloud, at prices significantly lower than storing and maintaining data in on-premises magnetic tape libraries or archiving data off-site.”

Engadget: Amazon fixes security flaws allowing smart home hijacks

Engadget: Amazon fixes security flaws allowing smart home hijacks. “Some smart home device owners may have dodged a bullet. Amazon recently patched 13 security flaws in an operating system for the Internet of Things, FreeRTOS, as well as Amazon Web Services connection modules. The holes let intruders crash devices, leak the contents of their memory and remotely run code, effectively giving attackers full control. The flaws might have been far-reaching if they’d gone unfixed — both FreeRTOS and its safety-oriented counterpart SafeRTOS are used in a wide range of devices inside and outside the home, including cars, aircraft and medical gear.”

The Register: Massive US military social media spying archive left wide open in AWS S3 buckets

I can’t even, y’all. From The Register: Massive US military social media spying archive left wide open in AWS S3 buckets . “Three misconfigured AWS S3 buckets have been discovered wide open on the public internet containing “dozens of terabytes” of social media posts and similar pages – all scraped from around the world by the US military to identify and profile persons of interest.”

CNBC: Google and Cisco team up in the cloud wars against Amazon

CNBC: Google and Cisco team up in the cloud wars against Amazon. “When Chuck Robbins was promoted to CEO of Cisco in 2015, the company’s technology was in danger of losing relevance. When Google named Diane Greene as head of its cloud division that same year, her unit was desperate to close the gap with Amazon Web Services. Two years later, Robbins and Greene are teaming up to develop and sell cloud technology and services in a whole new way and to take on AWS.”