Google Blog: Google Disability Support now includes American Sign Language

Google Blog: Google Disability Support now includes American Sign Language. “There are 466 million people in the world who are deaf and hard-of-hearing, and products like Live Transcribe and Sound Amplifier help them communicate and interact with others. If people with disabilities need specialized technical support for Google’s products and services, they can go to Google Disability Support, and starting today, there will be American Sign Language (ASL) specialists to help people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing through video chat, with help from Connect Direct through TELUS international.”

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language

Tech Xplore: StorySign app converts text in children’s books to sign language. “A team of researchers and engineers at Huawei AI has come up with a unique way to help deaf children learn to read sign language—by using AI and augmented reality to interpret printed books. They have also hit on a way to help deaf children develop enjoyment in reading.”

How to learn sign language: 9 apps and resources to teach yourself ASL (Mashable)

Mashable: How to learn sign language: 9 apps and resources to teach yourself ASL. “Learning to sign is easier than ever, thanks to the internet. The visual language, designed to aid the deaf or hard of hearing, is a set of gesticulations and hand movements that correspond to the spoken word. There are numerous ways to learn American Sign Language (ASL) outside the old classroom method. From free online lessons to video tutorials, a world of possibilities is open for those aspiring to teach themselves this hands-on language.”

Hyperallergic: Metropolitan Museum Aims for Accessibility with Sign Language Tours on Facebook Live

Hyperallergic: Metropolitan Museum Aims for Accessibility with Sign Language Tours on Facebook Live. “In the past couple of years, the Metropolitan Museum of Art has made an effort to reach new audiences on the internet. In February 2017, the museum launched its Open Access initiative, making hundreds of thousands of high-resolution images of works in its collections available for free and unrestricted use online. Last fall, the Met’s Access and Community Programs Education Department tapped into social media, presenting its first American Sign Language (ASL) tour on Facebook Live.”

State Library of Ohio: Ohio Digital Library Now Includes a Deaf Culture and American Sign Language Collection

State Library of Ohio: Ohio Digital Library Now Includes a Deaf Culture and American Sign Language Collection. “The State Library of Ohio is pleased to announce the Ohio Digital Library now includes a collection of eBooks and videos about Deaf culture and American Sign Language (ASL). The collection includes fiction and non-fiction for children and adults and covers many aspects of Deaf culture and ASL including language, history, education and instruction. The Deaf culture and ASL collection was developed by an Overdrive Account Analyst with a B.S. in American Sign Language Interpretation. With nearly 200 titles, the collection provides a beneficial resource to help increase awareness with the goal of bridging the gap between hearing cultures and Deaf cultures in today’s society.”

Rochester Institute of Technology: RIT/NTID’s Deaf Studies Archive receives grant to digitize rare videos about ASL poetry and literature

Rochester Institute of Technology: RIT/NTID’s Deaf Studies Archive receives grant to digitize rare videos about ASL poetry and literature. “Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf will digitize and make publicly accessible more than 60 videotapes held in the RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive that document the ASL poetry and literature movement in Rochester from 1970 through 2011. The digitized videos will be one of the largest collections of online publicly accessible rare ASL literature in the country.”

Giphy Releases GIF library for learning American Sign Language (ASL)

GIF site Giphy has released new resources for learning sign language. “Giphy released an extensive GIF library on Thursday with more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language. To create the GIFs, Giphy cut videos from the popular educational series Sign With Robert, adding text descriptions to make the GIFs look like looping flash cards.” As the article notes, there are plans for more materials.