New Getty Research Portal Virtual Collection: Anatomy and Art (Getty Library Blog)

Getty Library Blog: New Getty Research Portal Virtual Collection: Anatomy and Art. “Announcing the Getty Research Portal’s newest Virtual Collection, Anatomy and Art, to accompany the Getty Research Institute exhibition Flesh and Bones: The Art of Anatomy (February 22 – July 10, 2022), organized by guest curator Monique Kornell. The Virtual Collection brings together 128 records of fully digitized art history texts from 10 Portal contributors.”

Teaching Anatomy & Physiology on YouTube: Mrs. Reid, the Science G

I was searching YouTube when I came across a channel called Mrs. Reid, the Science G. From her About page: “Me and my sisters would remix songs when we were younger (waaay before YouTube), so it’s safe to say, I have had years of practice on how to create songs. As a science educator, I get to blend my two loves: music and education and I’m so EXCITED to share this journey with you!!!” I don’t know any of the music she’s redone because I’m old, but I did enjoy a remixed Cardi B called BODY PARTS AND BODY REGIONS; her music tends to focus on Anatomy & Physiology topics. She also has some A&P lectures available. Really good and recommended.

University of Wyoming: UW Museum of Vertebrates Launches 3D Scans Database for Remote Research, Teaching

University of Wyoming: UW Museum of Vertebrates Launches 3D Scans Database for Remote Research, Teaching. “UW’s Museum of Vertebrates, located in the Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center, and Coe Library Digital Collections recently released 65 3D scans, such as the skulls of eagles and bears. These images are available free to remote learners, researchers and teachers. The specimens can be viewed through augmented reality and rotated 360 degrees or downloaded as still images.”

UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain

UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain. “The researchers said their ultimate goal is to construct an online surface-based atlas containing layered maps of multiple modalities that can be used as a guide map to understand the topological organization, functions, and disorders of the human brain. This online atlas will be constructed for searching and browsing brain areas and functions, they said, include interactive multi-layer features similar to ‘Google Earth.’”

Human Cell Atlas: The plan to map every cell in your body (ABC News Australia)

ABC News (Australia): Human Cell Atlas: The plan to map every cell in your body. “Our bodies are made up of least 37 trillion cells, and scientists are teaming up around the world to map every single one of them. A new project called the Human Cell Atlas hopes to discover what each of these cells do. And the plan is to put the information in an online database that any scientist can use.”

Stanford: Digital archive of antique wax figures becomes a teaching tool

Stanford: Digital archive of antique wax figures becomes a teaching tool. “Huddled over a virtual dissection table, Stanford medical students zoomed in on glistening muscles and nerves in the neck by swiping their fingers across the giant touchscreen designed to visualize an entire body in three dimensions. What they were looking at, however, were not virtual renderings of human anatomy, or even images of the real thing; rather, they were examining high-resolution photographs of wax models made between the mid-17th and mid-19th centuries.” Warning: these wax models could be deeply disturbing.

EurekAlert: Announcing first-ever American Association of Anatomists Virtual Microscopy Database

EurekAlert: Announcing first-ever American Association of Anatomists Virtual Microscopy Database. “The American Association of Anatomists (AAA) launches their first-ever Virtual Microscopy Database available to educators and researchers worldwide. The Virtual Microscopy Database (VMD) was created as a centralized repository where a community of anatomy and histology scholars and researchers can share a large selection of virtual tissue slides for enhancing education, research, and scholarship.”

Now Available: A Database of Prehistoric Human Teeth

Now available: a database of prehistoric human teeth. “Archaeologists have created a new database from the teeth of prehistoric humans found at ancient burial sites in Britain and Ireland that tell us a lot about their climate, their diet and even how far they may have travelled. In a paper, led by Dr Maura Pellegrini from the University of Oxford, researchers say that individuals in prehistoric Britain were highly mobile.” It looks like the data are within the paper, not clear if it’s available as a separate download / standalone thing.