USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records. “In August, Ancestry released what it says is the most extensive and searchable Freedmen’s Bureau records by making available more than 3.5 million documents from the National Archives and Records Administration. Some records date back to 1846. And more than a month since the release, researchers like [Regina] Vaughn are discovering things on Ancestry they say would’ve taken them years, or things they would have never found. The site includes details such as labor contracts, bank records, marriage licenses, schools, and food and clothing for emancipated Black Americans.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Ancestry® spotlights an important, yet often overlooked, part of American history by unveiling the world’s largest digitized and searchable collection of Freedmen’s Bureau and Freedman’s Bank records. This addition of more than 3.5 million records can help descendants of previously enslaved people in the U.S. learn more about their families. The collection can enable meaningful family history breakthroughs because it is likely the first time newly freed African Americans would appear in records after Emancipation, as many enslaved people were previously excluded from standard census and federal documents.” The collection is free to access.

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats. “According to Ancestry now, users who upload content to Ancestry still give Ancestry a perpetual and non-revocable license to use the content. But, it says now, ‘perpetual and non-revocable’ doesn’t mean ‘perpetual and non-revocable.’”

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry. “Ancestry has just updated its terms of service and privacy statement — again — and this time there is a change buried deep in its language that is of significance to users. As of the change, effective yesterday (3 August 2021), a user can’t change his or her mind about any content uploaded to Ancestry: as of yesterday, you’ve just gifted the rights to that content to Ancestry, forever.”

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit. “On [January 4] in the Northern District of California, Ancestry.com and related entities and individuals filed a motion to dismiss the putative class action lawsuit against it claiming the company misappropriated their personal information and photographs for advertising and other promotional purposes. Ancestry claimed that this lawsuit is ‘misguided’ and should be dismissed with prejudice.”

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry sued for yearbooks

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry sued for yearbooks. “The case, brought by two California residents against Ancestry, focuses on the yearbook collection — ‘U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1999’ — and charges Ancestry with ‘knowingly misappropriating the photographs, likenesses, names, and identities of Plaintiffs and the class; knowingly using those photographs, likenesses, names, and identities for the commercial purpose of selling access to them in Ancestry products and services; and knowingly using those photographs, likenesses, names, and identities to advertise, sell, and solicit purchases of Ancestry services and products; without obtaining prior consent from Plaintiffs and the class.’”

Ancestry: Ancestry® Debuts World’s Largest, Searchable Digital Archive of Newspaper Published Historical Wedding Announcements

Ancestry: Ancestry® Debuts World’s Largest, Searchable Digital Archive of Newspaper Published Historical Wedding Announcements . “Today, Ancestry is excited to launch the first phase of the Newspapers.com™ Marriage Index collection, powered by cutting-edge technology. We trained machine learning algorithms to comb through more than 600 million pages of digitized newspapers to extract and identify key names, relationships and other facts from marriage and engagement announcements in historical newspapers via text classification.”

BetaNews: Ancestry. com claims no harm from security vulnerability in Family Tree Maker

BetaNews: Ancestry.com claims no harm from security vulnerability in Family Tree Maker. “If you’re at all familiar with genealogy then you’ll likely know both Ancestry and Family Tree Maker — they an integral part of the pastime. Unfortunately, independent review site WizCase recently discovered an open and unencrypted ElasticSearch server that belonged to Software MacKiev, the owners of Family Tree Maker. The leak exposed thousands of records including email addresses, user locations, and other sensitive personal information. FTM was owned by Ancestry.com until 2016 when Software MacKiev took it over, and the software is still used to upload databases to the Ancestry online trees.”

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery

Courthouse News: African Ancestry Data Offers Deeper Examination of History of Slavery. “The transatlantic slave trade officially ending in the 19th century, but the effects of that brutal system continue to reverberate in the genes of enslaved people’s ancestors, according to a new study. Pairing genetic data with historical records, researchers at 23andMe can now paint a clearer picture of African ancestry in the New World, detailing the origins of enslaved Africans and the methods used to exploit them after they survived the grueling Middle Passage.”

BetaNews: Ancestry. com announces COVID-19 (coronavirus) testing

BetaNews: Ancestry.com announces COVID-19 (coronavirus) testing. “With the current pandemic continuing to grow in some areas, and unemployment rising even faster than food prices, we need problem solvers. Help at this time comes mostly from doctors and scientists, but can also come from other surprising areas. If you’ve recently taken an AncestryDNA test, Ancestry.com is inviting you to supply some information that could assist in the fight against COVID-19.”

Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database. “Privacy has become a naive, even passe idea in the minds of many Americans, particularly those raised in a world where social media, smartphones and the Patriot Act are the norm. But the increasing popularity of DNA testing services, in which people pay to have their DNA analyzed and stored by private companies, has set the stage for an important new battleground in the war on privacy.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE). “Today at RootsTech, the largest family history technology conference, Ancestry® announced the release of a game-changing content collection of all 36 million of the nation’s available World War II young man’s draft cards, further empowering customers’ journeys of personal discovery. Available now on Ancestry, the completion of this multi-year project with the US National Archives & Records Administration involved digitizing these valuable records to create a fully searchable collection, including color images.”