Genealogy’s Star: 1950 U.S. Census Project Moving Rapidly Forward

Genealogy’s Star: 1950 U.S. Census Project Moving Rapidly Forward. “If you go to the FamilySearch 1950 U.S. Census Project page… you will see that four states have been completed and that only two more are open right now (as of the date of this post). Checking handwriting recognition from Ancestry.com is a different experience from indexing. The accuracy is significant, and it is apparent that the entire project will likely be completed in a matter of months and perhaps weeks.”

News@Northeastern: This Data Science Engineer Helps Family Trees Grow At Ancestry.com

News@Northeastern: This Data Science Engineer Helps Family Trees Grow At Ancestry.com. “When Ravalika Kurumilla, in the second year of a data science engineering master’s program, was searching for her first co-op at Northeastern, she knew what she didn’t want: a work-while-you-learn opportunity that didn’t allow co-ops to live and bond together like a family.’ With most co-ops you have to work only with the people in your department, but Ancestry has this rule that co-ops must stay together and get to know each other,’ she says of Ancestry.com, the Utah-based family tree and genetic testing company where she has been working in data analytics.”

Canada Newswire: Digitized Photos and Newsreels Offer Glimpse Into Lives of Canadians During WWII (PRESS RELEASE)

Canada Newswire: Digitized Photos and Newsreels Offer Glimpse Into Lives of Canadians During WWII (PRESS RELEASE). “This Remembrance Day, Ancestry®, the global leader in family history, is encouraging Canadians to build deeper personal connections with their families’ lives during the world wars, by providing free access to two Canadian World War II record collections that are new to the site, including video newsreels and photographs featuring photographs of men and women who served in the Canadian Forces during the conflict.”

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records

USA Today: Black genealogists’ surprising findings using Ancestry’s digitized U.S. Freedmen’s records. “In August, Ancestry released what it says is the most extensive and searchable Freedmen’s Bureau records by making available more than 3.5 million documents from the National Archives and Records Administration. Some records date back to 1846. And more than a month since the release, researchers like [Regina] Vaughn are discovering things on Ancestry they say would’ve taken them years, or things they would have never found. The site includes details such as labor contracts, bank records, marriage licenses, schools, and food and clothing for emancipated Black Americans.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Adds New Freedmen’s Bureau Collection that Enables Family History Discoveries for Descendants of Formerly Enslaved People (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Ancestry® spotlights an important, yet often overlooked, part of American history by unveiling the world’s largest digitized and searchable collection of Freedmen’s Bureau and Freedman’s Bank records. This addition of more than 3.5 million records can help descendants of previously enslaved people in the U.S. learn more about their families. The collection can enable meaningful family history breakthroughs because it is likely the first time newly freed African Americans would appear in records after Emancipation, as many enslaved people were previously excluded from standard census and federal documents.” The collection is free to access.

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry retreats. “According to Ancestry now, users who upload content to Ancestry still give Ancestry a perpetual and non-revocable license to use the content. But, it says now, ‘perpetual and non-revocable’ doesn’t mean ‘perpetual and non-revocable.’”

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry

The Legal Genealogist: One big change at Ancestry. “Ancestry has just updated its terms of service and privacy statement — again — and this time there is a change buried deep in its language that is of significance to users. As of the change, effective yesterday (3 August 2021), a user can’t change his or her mind about any content uploaded to Ancestry: as of yesterday, you’ve just gifted the rights to that content to Ancestry, forever.”

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit

Law Street Media: Ancestry .com Moves to Dismiss Yearbook Photo Misappropriation Suit. “On [January 4] in the Northern District of California, Ancestry.com and related entities and individuals filed a motion to dismiss the putative class action lawsuit against it claiming the company misappropriated their personal information and photographs for advertising and other promotional purposes. Ancestry claimed that this lawsuit is ‘misguided’ and should be dismissed with prejudice.”

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry sued for yearbooks

Legal Genealogist: Ancestry sued for yearbooks. “The case, brought by two California residents against Ancestry, focuses on the yearbook collection — ‘U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1999’ — and charges Ancestry with ‘knowingly misappropriating the photographs, likenesses, names, and identities of Plaintiffs and the class; knowingly using those photographs, likenesses, names, and identities for the commercial purpose of selling access to them in Ancestry products and services; and knowingly using those photographs, likenesses, names, and identities to advertise, sell, and solicit purchases of Ancestry services and products; without obtaining prior consent from Plaintiffs and the class.’”

Ancestry: Ancestry® Debuts World’s Largest, Searchable Digital Archive of Newspaper Published Historical Wedding Announcements

Ancestry: Ancestry® Debuts World’s Largest, Searchable Digital Archive of Newspaper Published Historical Wedding Announcements . “Today, Ancestry is excited to launch the first phase of the Newspapers.com™ Marriage Index collection, powered by cutting-edge technology. We trained machine learning algorithms to comb through more than 600 million pages of digitized newspapers to extract and identify key names, relationships and other facts from marriage and engagement announcements in historical newspapers via text classification.”