BetaNews: Ancestry. com announces COVID-19 (coronavirus) testing

BetaNews: Ancestry.com announces COVID-19 (coronavirus) testing. “With the current pandemic continuing to grow in some areas, and unemployment rising even faster than food prices, we need problem solvers. Help at this time comes mostly from doctors and scientists, but can also come from other surprising areas. If you’ve recently taken an AncestryDNA test, Ancestry.com is inviting you to supply some information that could assist in the fight against COVID-19.”

Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Gross overreach: Ancestry. com was right to block access to DNA database. “Privacy has become a naive, even passe idea in the minds of many Americans, particularly those raised in a world where social media, smartphones and the Patriot Act are the norm. But the increasing popularity of DNA testing services, in which people pay to have their DNA analyzed and stored by private companies, has set the stage for an important new battleground in the war on privacy.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (PRESS RELEASE). “Today at RootsTech, the largest family history technology conference, Ancestry® announced the release of a game-changing content collection of all 36 million of the nation’s available World War II young man’s draft cards, further empowering customers’ journeys of personal discovery. Available now on Ancestry, the completion of this multi-year project with the US National Archives & Records Administration involved digitizing these valuable records to create a fully searchable collection, including color images.”

BuzzFeed News: A Court Tried To Force Ancestry.com To Open Up Its DNA Database To Police. The Company Said No.

BuzzFeed News: A Court Tried To Force Ancestry.com To Open Up Its DNA Database To Police. The Company Said No.. “Ancestry.com, the largest DNA testing company in the world, was served a search warrant to give police access to its database of some 16 million DNA profiles, but the company did not comply.”

Ancestry: Your Privacy is our Top Priority

Ancestry: Your Privacy is our Top Priority. “Your privacy is important to us. That’s why we want to share our position on a recent event where a Florida judge issued a search warrant to allow law enforcement to search all of GEDmatch, an open data personal genomics database. Following the issuance of the search warrant, GEDmatch opened its database of nearly one million users — beyond those who had consented to such access — within 24 hours. Ancestry believes that GEDmatch could have done more to protect the privacy of its users, by pushing back on the warrant or even challenging it in court.”

New York Times: ‘Game-Changer’ Warrant Let Detective Search Genetic Database

New York Times: ‘Game-Changer’ Warrant Let Detective Search Genetic Database. “The two largest sites, Ancestry.com and 23andMe, have long pledged to keep their users’ genetic information private, and a smaller one, GEDmatch, severely restricted police access to its records this year. Last week, however, a Florida detective announced at a police convention that he had obtained a warrant to penetrate GEDmatch and search its full database of nearly one million users.”

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Debuts the World’s Largest Digital Archive of Searchable Online Obituaries and Death Announcements, Powered by Cutting-Edge Artificial Intelligence (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: Ancestry® Debuts the World’s Largest Digital Archive of Searchable Online Obituaries and Death Announcements, Powered by Cutting-Edge Artificial Intelligence (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, Ancestry®, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, is releasing the new Newspapers.com Obituary Collection and announcing an upgrade to its U.S. Obituary Collection, adding to what is now the world’s largest, searchable digital archive of over 262 million worldwide obituaries and death announcements, containing almost 1 billion searchable family members.”

Ancestry Blog: “A New Leaf”, A new Television Series by Ancestry® to debut on NBC this Fall

Ancestry Blog: “A New Leaf”, A new Television Series by Ancestry® to debut on NBC this Fall. “Each week ‘A New Leaf’ will follow people on the cusp of key life inflection points, who using family history, genealogy, and sometimes AncestryDNA® analysis will go on a journey of self-discovery and learn from the past while looking to the future. In partnership with Ancestry, Fuentes will join families as they learn the importance of appreciating and understanding their family history and ancestors in order to make important life decisions. “

USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust

USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust. “Ancestry is digitizing millions of Holocaust and Nazi-persecution records and making them searchable online for the first time ever. Anyone, not just Ancestry’s paid members, can explore the records at the company’s site.”

Ancestry Blog: This Veterans Day, Discover the Military Heroes in your Family

Ancestry Blog: This Veterans Day, Discover the Military Heroes in your Family. “For the past 30 years, our focus has been digitizing and making historical content accessible for everyone – today, we offer more than 10 billion historical documents, including an unmatched collection of more than 250 million military records. As America celebrates Veterans Day this year, and its service members who have fought (and still fight) to uphold American values, we are encouraging Americans to discover more about the role their families may have played in our nation’s military history by providing free access to our military records from November 2 to 12.”

BuzzFeed News: Ancestry. com Is In Cahoots With Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects

BuzzFeed News: Ancestry.com Is In Cahoots With Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects. “I know that Michael Peck, my great-great-great-grandfather, died on July 14, 1922. I know this because last October I visited the cemetery in Cornwall, New York, to find the date on his headstone. I had been searching for information on Michael for almost a decade on Ancestry.com, but never found any information about his death. Had I waited until a few weeks ago, I could have saved myself the trip upstate. Ancestry finally added the New York State Death Index for 1852–1956 to its collection, and I would have found Michael’s date of death with a few clicks of a mouse. This new archive on Ancestry, however, was added under questionable circumstances, one genealogist claims.”

The Star: Border agents using DNA databases like familytree.com and ancestry.com to ID detainees, track relatives

The Star: Border agents using DNA databases like familytree.com and ancestry.com to ID detainees, track relatives. “Canada has been trying to deport Franklin Godwin since 2000 when the former refugee was declared a danger to the public for his lengthy criminal convictions of drug offences and fraud. Twice, in 2003 and 2005, Canada Border Services Agency escorted the 54-year-old Toronto man to Liberia, where he said he ran away from due to political persecution by a dictatorial regime — a claim his successful asylum bid in 1994 was based on. Twice, he was refused entry because officials didn’t believe he’s from there.”

Washington Post: Ancestry, 23andMe and others say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police

Washington Post: Ancestry, 23andMe and others say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police. “Ancestry, 23andMe and other popular companies that offer genetic testing pledged on Tuesday to be upfront when they share users’ DNA data with researchers, hand it over to police or transfer it to other companies, a move aimed at addressing consumers’ mounting privacy concerns.”

Miami Herald: Who is the secretive Google offshoot that has access to Ancestry’s DNA database?

Miami Herald: Who is the secretive Google offshoot that has access to Ancestry’s DNA database?. “…when customers sign up to have their data shared with research partners of Ancestry, 23andMe and other companies, they are taking a leap of faith. Ancestry’s main research partner is Calico, founded by Google and now part of its Alphabet Inc. parent company, which researches therapies aimed at extending the human life span. Unlike public institutions, California-based Calico discloses little about its DNA work, and many view it as a vanity project for Silicon Valley billionaires seeking breakthroughs to extend their own lives. ‘Calico was founded around the idea of making people live forever,’ said John Simpson, an advocate with Consumer Watchdog, a nonprofit group that monitors Google and other Silicon Valley players. ‘It is very murky, and they are not very forthcoming about what they are doing.'”