Reuters: Ancient Christian manuscripts digitised at monastery beneath Mount Sinai

Reuters: Ancient Christian manuscripts digitised at monastery beneath Mount Sinai. “At St. Catherine’s Monastery at the foot of Egypt’s Mount Sinai, the silence in the library is broken only by low electrical humming, as an early manuscript is bathed in green light. A team from Greece are photographing thousands of fragile manuscripts, including some of the earliest copies of the Christian gospels, using a complex process that includes taking images in red, green and blue light and merging them with computer software to create a single high-quality colour picture.”

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past. “During the 1950s and 1960s, US spy planes made regular flights across Europe, Central Asia, and the Middle East, photographing the terrain to track military targets. A chunk of the Middle Eastern photographs were declassified in 1997, and now those airborne images are helping archaeologists track changing features in the landscape that in many cases are no longer visible today, according to a new paper published in Advances in Archaeological Practice.”

IrishCentral: Thousands of Ireland’s ring forts to be documented in new social media account

IrishCentral: Thousands of Ireland’s ring forts to be documented in new social media account. “[Keith] O’Faoláin wrote that he is using data from the Archaeological Survey of Ireland’s database of the National Monuments Service Sites and Monuments Record (SMR). In the dataset, 30,0125 sites in Ireland are categorized as rath, cashel, or ringfort, but O’Faoláin is working with 29,772 sites that have correct coordinates.” If you’d like to learn more about ring forts, Daily Kos has an extensive article.

Massachusetts Daily Collegian: UMass professor receives $245,000 to bring ancient art of Pompeii to the internet of today

Massachusetts Daily Collegian: UMass professor receives $245,000 to bring ancient art of Pompeii to the internet of today . “Associate Professor Eric Poehler of the University of Massachusetts classics department recently received a grant worth $245,000 from the Getty Foundation for the three-year long Pompeii Artistic Landscape Project. The project is meant to digitize and contextualize the ancient art of the Roman city of Pompeii in an online database and open source tool for all to use.”

ScienceDaily: Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks

ScienceDaily: Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks . “Long before Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and even MySpace, early Mississippian Mound cultures in America’s southern Appalachian Mountains shared artistic trends and technologies across regional networks that functioned in similar ways as modern social media, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.”

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past. “In a tech-savvy world, SDSU’s Classics department is adopting more innovative means in which students can take a look at ancient artifacts – without having to travel thousands of miles across the globe. ‘Some of the most important pieces are sherds … there’s one piece in New York, four pieces in Florence, two pieces in Paris in the Louvre,’ Dr. Danielle Bennett, a professor in the Humanities department said. ‘3D design is going to bring them all together in the digital library.'”

Al-Fanar Media: In Jordan, Antiquities Sites Enlist Nearby Communities as Partners

Al-Fanar Media: In Jordan, Antiquities Sites Enlist Nearby Communities as Partners. “A prominent theme among presentations scheduled for a major international conference on the archaeology of Jordan, being held in Florence, Italy, this month, is the growth of projects that engage local communities in the preservation of ancient sites.”