New York Times: A Eureka Moment, Recreated in Film

New York Times: A Eureka Moment, Recreated in Film. “The efforts by the Museum of Fine Arts to make art more accessible through technology is part of a larger trend, said Eric Longo, executive director of MCN, an association for museum professionals to share practices about emerging technologies (previously called the Museum Computer Network). ‘Most museums have increased the size of their digital teams,’ he said, and many museums now have tech labs and innovation incubators to develop and test new ideas.”

Smithsonian Magazine: What’s Next for the 1.2 Million Prehistoric Fossils Now at Smithsonian

Smithsonian Magazine: What’s Next for the 1.2 Million Prehistoric Fossils Now at Smithsonian. “Under the grass, gravel, soil and sand lies layers of rock containing a record of past life. In North America, paleontologists have been studying this record for over 150 years. Many of the fossils they unearthed were stored in the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Denver Fossil Collection…. Earlier this year, the last of the USGS collection’s 1.2 million fossils arrived at the museum, completing an acquisition that began back in 2018. But the acquisition was only one step in a bigger plan to systematize and digitize the USGS fossils for scientists everywhere to access for research.”

The Guardian: Historic England to offer virtual flights over ancient landscapes

The Guardian: Historic England to offer virtual flights over ancient landscapes. “The Aerial Archaeological Mapping Explorer contains thousands of sites identified on half a million aerial photographs covering more than half the country. Further archaeological remains have been identified using airborne laser scanning technology known as lidar (light, detection and ranging), which creates 3D images of the Earth’s surface.”

Google Blog: Explore the Cradle of Creativity on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Explore the Cradle of Creativity on Google Arts & Culture. “The Cradle of Creativity, a new project on Google Arts & Culture, explores how creativity evolved in Africa from rock art to contemporary brush strokes. In collaboration with the Yemisi Shyllon Museum of Art (YSMA) in Nigeria and the Origins Centre in South Africa, you can now explore 50 expertly-curated stories, featuring over 60 high-resolution Gigapixel images of artworks digitized using the Google Art Camera, 17 Street View virtual tours and, for teachers and students, a dedicated lesson plan.”

UK National Trust: Full personal collection of photographs taken by Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff at Sutton Hoo excavation digitised and online for the first time

UK National Trust: Full personal collection of photographs taken by Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff at Sutton Hoo excavation digitised and online for the first time. “Schoolmistresses and close friends, Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff, were serious amateur photographers with an interest in archaeology. In the summer of 1939, they visited Sutton Hoo in Suffolk and went on to create an extraordinary photographic record of one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time.”

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant. “Once home to the ancestors of the Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, Yavapai, Havasupai, Hualapai, and several bands of Apache and Paiute, the Wupatki National Monument in Northern Arizona holds a precious record of migration, trade, and other practices dating back to the 11th century. The Center for Architectural Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design has received a $1.3 million grant from Getty to develop a conservation and management plan and professional training program for the site, which faces a variety of threats.”

Michigan State University: Bringing an archaeology project into the digital age

Michigan State University: Bringing an archaeology project into the digital age. “The design and tone of the new website combines classic and contemporary elements, reflecting the omnipresent application of digital technologies in modern-day archaeology. Visitors to the website will see a carefully curated blend of black-and-white and color photographs taken throughout the dig’s collaborative history.” The dig referenced is the MSU Excavations at Isthmia, Greece. Research at the site became an ongoing thing in the early 1950s.

CNET: 3,700-year-old clay tablet shows we’ve been using geometry for longer than we realized

CNET: 3,700-year-old clay tablet shows we’ve been using geometry for longer than we realized. “Despite what you may have thought in school, all those numbers and angles really can come in handy — something that even surveyors in ancient Babylon knew. The etchings on the clay tablet pictured above reveal that people have been using geometry in everyday life for centuries longer than many have assumed. The tablet is known as Si.427, and it dates back to the Old Babylonian Period between 1900 and 1600 BCE.”

Department of Justice: Rare Cuneiform Tablet Bearing Portion of Epic of Gilgamesh Forfeited to United States

Department of Justice: Rare Cuneiform Tablet Bearing Portion of Epic of Gilgamesh Forfeited to United States. “Known as the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet, it originated in the area of modern-day Iraq and entered the United States contrary to federal law. An international auction house (the Auction House) later sold the tablet to Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. (Hobby Lobby), a prominent arts-and-crafts retailer based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, for display at the Museum of the Bible (the Museum). Law enforcement agents seized the tablet from the Museum in September 2019.”

Google Blog: Explore the undeciphered writing of the Incas

Google Blog: Explore the undeciphered writing of the Incas. “‘Khipus,’ which means ‘knots’ in the Quechua language, are the colorful, intricate cords made by the Incas, who inhabited some parts of South America before the Spanish colonization of the Americas. These knotted strings are still an enigma waiting to be unraveled. What secrets are hidden in these colorful knots dating back centuries? What messages from the Incas echo in these intricate cords? Could the ancestral knowledge they hold inform us about our future?

Live Science: Book of the Dead fragments, half a world apart, are pieced together

Live Science: Book of the Dead fragments, half a world apart, are pieced together. “The two linen fragments were pieced together after a digital image of one segment was cataloged on an open-source online database by the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Historians at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles who saw the image quickly realized that the institute had a shroud fragment that, like a puzzle piece, fit together with the New Zealand segment.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting. “Lighting sources could indeed hold vital clues to the different ways prehistoric peoples used caves, according to a new paper by a team of Spanish scientists, published in the journal PLOS ONE. They conducted in situ experiments with three different kinds of Paleolithic lighting sources in the hopes of shedding some light (pun intended) on what those various illumination methods might tell us about the emergence of ‘human symbolic and artistic behavior’ in the form of cave art.”

Shine (China): A Silk Road journey from antiquity to today

Shine (China): A Silk Road journey from antiquity to today. “The annual Silk Road Week will run from June 19 to 24 at the China National Silk Museum, offering professionals the opportunity to share their Silk Road stories and the latest research…. On June 18, the museum will launch the Silk Road Online Museum, a digital platform partnering with 40 museums from home and abroad. The digital museum will greatly expand the space for exhibits at the brick-and-mortar museum and build a bridge for sharing collections and hosting online exhibitions.”