ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost

ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost. “China’s world famous Terracotta Army attraction has been given a digital boost thanks to the Chinese web-based encyclopedia Baidu Baike, in partnership with the Emperor Qinshihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum. Together they’ve created a large-scale, high definition ‘digital museum’ for the country’s UNESCO World Heritage site, reports China News Service.”

Google Blog: Step inside the Forbidden City with precious artworks from the Palace Museum on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Step inside the Forbidden City with precious artworks from the Palace Museum on Google Arts & Culture. “…starting today, anyone with an internet connection can now glimpse inside and view 100 precious artifacts from the Palace Museum on Google Arts & Culture. The exhibit captures the breadth of rare and valuable works that are on display in the Forbidden City—from calligraphy to ceramics, silk paintings to stone carvings, and jades and other jewels. The Palace Museum collection on Google Arts & Culture covers over 6,000 years of China’s culture and history, and sheds particular light on the Qianlong Emperor’s reign, the traditions and prosperity of the Qing Empire.”

ISAW of New York University Starts Online Video Archive for Its Lectures

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University has started a online video archive for its lectures. Sample lectures: “Globalising the Mediterranean’s Iron Age”, “Medicine and the Humanities from Ancient to Modern”, and “Fantastical Space and Heroic Journeys in Mesopotamian Literature”.

Phys.org: Official launch of public database of ‘at risk’ archaeological sites

Phys.org: Official launch of public database of ‘at risk’ archaeological sites . “Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa, (EAMENA) an archaeological preservation project, will today launch public access to its online database of nearly 20,000 archaeological sites at severe risk due to conflict and other agents of destruction in the Middle East and North Africa.”

Forbes: Saving Endangered Data From Ancient Rome To Trump’s America

Forbes: Saving Endangered Data From Ancient Rome To Trump’s America. “From San Francisco to New York City, groups of scientists, librarians, researchers and concerned Americans have rushed to preserve federal data and citations that have begun to disappear from government websites. Such efforts have culminated in a series of independently organized events across the country dubbed Endangered Data Week. Believe it or not, this isn’t a new problem. Even in Ancient Rome, political leaders were fond of destroying records and documents that painted a picture of a reality they couldn’t accept.”

Syria Deeply: Preserving the Past in Damascus Builds Hope for the Future

Syria Deeply: Preserving the Past in Damascus Builds Hope for the Future. “Historian and political analyst Sami Moubayed discusses his efforts to preserve the Syrian capital’s archives and cultural history and the war’s impact on the country’s many ancient sites and artifacts.”

CCTV: Joint efforts to make ancient books available online

CCTV: Joint efforts to make ancient books available online. “Gone are the days when you had to make a trip to the local library to borrow and then return a book. A joint effort made by five libraries in China have uploaded a large bunch of ancient books onto the internet. Now by clicking a mouse, you can read as much as 24,000 time-honored books of various categories. The National Library of China, Shanghai Library, Tianjin Library, Zhejiang Library and Yunnan Library unveiled their latest batch of ancient books available on their websites.”