New York Times: Hundreds of Mysterious Stone ‘Gates’ Found in Saudi Arabia’s Desert

New York Times: Hundreds of Mysterious Stone ‘Gates’ Found in Saudi Arabia’s Desert. “Google Earth has unlocked the gates to ancient mysteries around the world. For years, amateur and professional archaeologists have used the search engine’s satellite imagery to discover mysterious earthworks in Kazakhstan, Roman ruins, a forgotten fortress in Afghanistan and more. In the past decade, Google Earth also has helped identify thousands of burial sites and other ‘works of the old men,’ as they’re called, scattered across Saudi Arabia. Now, archaeologists have uncovered nearly 400 previously undocumented stone structures they call “gates” in the Arabian desert that they believe may have been built by nomadic tribes thousands of years ago.”

U of Wyoming: UW Geological Museum Receives Grant to Digitize Wyoming’s Rare Fossil Mammal Collection

University of Wyoming: UW Geological Museum Receives Grant to Digitize Wyoming’s Rare Fossil Mammal Collection. “The University of Wyoming Geological Museum has only one-half of 1 percent of its fossils on display to the public. The other 99.5 percent are stored away, and very few, save some visiting researchers, rarely see these hidden treasures in any form. Thanks to a $100,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the museum will be able to make more of its rare fossil mammal collection available to researchers, schools and the public through digitization of roughly 5,000 items.”

China.org.cn: English edition of Digital Dunhuang officially launched

China.org.cn: English edition of Digital Dunhuang officially launched . “The goal of Digital Dunhuang is to pool massive amounts of data related to the Dunhuang Caves, famous for their grottoes with ancient wall paintings, that have already been available or will be in the near future, including images, videos, and archaeological and protection materials. Based on more than 20 years of arduous work in digitalizing the artworks, Digital Dunhuang is a large and integrated digital resource and service platform for Dunhuang wall paintings and research results.” Strangely the story does not link to the new resource. I believe it’s at http://www.e-dunhuang.com/index.htm . Please correct me in the comments if I’m wrong.

My Statesman (TX): Archaeologists work to gather data from fading rock art sites

My Statesman (Texas): Archaeologists work to gather data from fading rock art sites. “Everywhere, limestone is gradually flaking away, taking with it stories of the ancient people who lived here. That’s why the Shumla Archaeological Research & Education Center in Comstock has launched a four-year effort, dubbed the Alexandria Project, to gather baseline data about the artwork before it disappears. Researchers are working with private land owners to gain access to sites to snap detailed photos, record GPS coordinates and gather information for three-dimensional models that can be studied by scholars long after the artwork has deteriorated. They are creating an online library of rock art.”

University of Arizona: Digital Archaeology Project to Use Big Data

University of Arizona: Digital Archaeology Project to Use Big Data. “”To help provide researchers, scholars and the general public with a ‘deep history’ understanding of some of the grand challenges facing society, [Barbara] Mills and fellow UA researcher Sudha Ram are leading an interdisciplinary National Science Foundation-funded project to build an online system that pulls together and synthesizes archaeological data spanning several centuries of U.S history. The project, called cyberSW, focuses specifically on pre-Hispanic archaeological data from the American Southwest — Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Colorado — from A.D. 800 to the 1500s, shortly after the arrival of the Spanish in the region.”

Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online

Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online. “You no longer have to visit the British Museum in London to see the Rosetta Stone in detail. Last week, the museum published the first 3D scan of the famous slab of hieroglyphics online at Sketchfab, where it’s accompanied by the website’s new sound support feature.”