Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.

Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.. “Scholars from Heidelberg University and New York University (USA) spearheaded the development of the newly released open-access database, which offers information about and transcripts of Greek and Latin texts preserved on fragments of papyri, but also, for example, on ceramic shards or wooden tablets…. The database is accessible to anyone and currently has information on nearly 15,000 fragments of ancient works. Approximately 1,000 of these entries include the corresponding Greek or Latin texts.”

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London. “Daesh militants smashed the original to pieces in 2015, but it has now been recreated by Iraqi-American artist Michael Rakowitz, using recycled cans that contained another treasure from Iraq — date syrup…. The sculpture was chosen from a shortlist of six and is part of a larger project by Rakowitz. The Chicago-based artist is gradually reconstructing the entire database of 7,000 works looted from the National Museum of Iraq in 2003 or destroyed at archaeological sites in the aftermath of the Iraq war.”

This Is Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

This Is Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs. “Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs.” What a simple and terrific idea!

Stanford: Hidden Medical Text Read for the First Time in a Thousand Years

Stanford: Hidden Medical Text Read for the First Time in a Thousand Years. “An influential physician and a philosopher of early Western medicine, Galen of Pergamon was the doctor of emperors and gladiators. One of his many works, ‘On the Mixtures and Powers of Simple Drugs,’ was an important pharmaceutical text that would help educate fellow Greek-Roman doctors. The text was translated during the 6th century into Syriac, a language that served as a bridge between Greek and Arabic and helped spread Galen’s ideas into the ancient Islamic world. But despite the physician’s fame, the most complete surviving version of the translated manuscript was erased and written over with hymns in the 11th century – a common practice at the time. These written-over documents are known as palimpsests. An international team of researchers is getting a clear look at the hidden text of the Syriac Galen Palimpsest with an X-ray study at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.”

Eurasia Review: Funding For Database To Index Ancient Egyptian Texts

Eurasia Review: Funding For Database To Index Ancient Egyptian Texts. “Heidelberg University has been awarded funding from the German Research Foundation (DFG) for a database project to index and decipher documents from ancient Egypt. Demotic language texts originating between the 7th century BC and the 5th century AD are to be made available for research via open access publication. The texts, some of which are still unpublished, range from legal and administrative documents to academic and religious records.”

Rutgers University: Rutgers Digitizes Roman Coin Collection, Making it Accessible to the World

Rutgers University: Rutgers Digitizes Roman Coin Collection, Making it Accessible to the World. “The Rutgers University Libraries have digitized an invaluable collection of 1,250 coins from the ancient Roman Republic, some dating to the beginning of coinage – and just time for the Ides of March.”

European Commission: Global digital archive provides accessible link to the past

European Commission: Global digital archive provides accessible link to the past. “The ARIADNE project has created a registry of archaeological repositories and a portal to search and access them. At present, about 2 million records are retrievable. Users can filter their search by time period (e.g. the first century BC), place (e.g. Western Mediterranean), object (e.g. amphorae) and access a list of potentially relevant documents in several languages.” The link is via “Project website” at the very very bottom of the page.