TechCrunch: AI is helping scholars restore ancient Greek texts on stone tablets

TechCrunch: AI is helping scholars restore ancient Greek texts on stone tablets. “Machine learning and AI may be deployed on such grand tasks as finding exoplanets and creating photorealistic people, but the same techniques also have some surprising applications in academia: DeepMind has created an AI system that helps scholars understand and recreate fragmentary ancient Greek texts on broken stone tablets.”

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past. “The ability to extract and sequence DNA from samples that are thousands and even hundreds of thousands of years old has led to significant breakthroughs in the study of evolution. By sequencing Neanderthal genomes, scientists have learned about the health, physical appearance and settlement patterns of Neanderthals. Even more important, DNA research led to the discovery of formerly unknown hominids…. These successes led researches to apply genetic tools to later periods, and according to some critics that is where the danger lies.”

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum. “This project has fully digitized the remarkable collection of ancient Maya art and architecture gathered by Alfred Maudslay in the late 19th century. Maudslay used the latest technology of his time to record the stories of ancient Maya cities in Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras. He developed the first dry glass plate photographs of iconic sites like Palenque, Chichen Itza and Tikal, spending years living and working throughout the region. He also created more than 400 large plaster cast replicas of building facades and monuments, which have been stored in the British Museum for more than 100 years.”

EurekAlert: From Haft Tappeh to the world wide web

EurekAlert: From Haft Tappeh to the world wide web. “Archaeologist Dr. Behzad Mofidi-Nasrabadi of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) excavated cuneiform texts on clay tablets at Haft Tappeh, dating back to the middle of the second millennium B.C. and decipherable only by a handful of experts around the world…. Thanks to funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to the tune of EUR 500,000, a project is underway to digitally process the texts and make them available to the public online.”

The Guardian: Ancient scrolls charred by Vesuvius could be read once again

The Guardian: Ancient scrolls charred by Vesuvius could be read once again. “When Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79 it destroyed the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, their inhabitants and their prized possessions – among them a fine library of scrolls that were carbonised by the searing heat of ash and gas. But scientists say there may still be hope that the fragile documents can once more be read thanks to an innovative approach involving high-energy x-rays and artificial intelligence.”

Architect Magazine: Architecture Researchers Help Document First Amphitheater Discovered in Europe in 150 Years

Architect Magazine: Architecture Researchers Help Document First Amphitheater Discovered in Europe in 150 Years. “Going forward, the team will turn over the large point cloud data sets of this information to Volterra officials as the municipality undertakes a multiyear, multimillon dollar effort to excavate the structure. The digital maps may help archaeologists relocate roads and drainage to access the amphitheater and to ensure that shifting the existing sediment does not damage ancient walls. With excavation underway, the team plans to return in the fall to continue the digital archiving of the structure.”