ScienceDaily: Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks

ScienceDaily: Pottery reveals America’s first social media networks . “Long before Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and even MySpace, early Mississippian Mound cultures in America’s southern Appalachian Mountains shared artistic trends and technologies across regional networks that functioned in similar ways as modern social media, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.”

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past. “In a tech-savvy world, SDSU’s Classics department is adopting more innovative means in which students can take a look at ancient artifacts – without having to travel thousands of miles across the globe. ‘Some of the most important pieces are sherds … there’s one piece in New York, four pieces in Florence, two pieces in Paris in the Louvre,’ Dr. Danielle Bennett, a professor in the Humanities department said. ‘3D design is going to bring them all together in the digital library.'”

Al-Fanar Media: In Jordan, Antiquities Sites Enlist Nearby Communities as Partners

Al-Fanar Media: In Jordan, Antiquities Sites Enlist Nearby Communities as Partners. “A prominent theme among presentations scheduled for a major international conference on the archaeology of Jordan, being held in Florence, Italy, this month, is the growth of projects that engage local communities in the preservation of ancient sites.”

Ars Technica: Satellites watch over the graves of ancient steppe nomads

Ars Technica: Satellites watch over the graves of ancient steppe nomads. “University of Sydney archaeologist Gino Caspari and his colleagues searched for Scythian burial mounds, or kurgans, in high-resolution satellite images of a 110 square kilometer (68.4 square mile) area of the Xinjiang province in northwestern China. They mapped their findings and noted how many of the burial mounds looked like they’d been disturbed by looters. When looters dig up the contents of the grave pit, the center of the mound usually collapses. Observers who know what they’re looking for can spot that from above; imagine looking at a sheet of bubble wrap to see which ones have been popped. Although the satellite images weren’t as precise as a detailed ground survey, they offered a pretty accurate estimate of the general situation on the ground—and the news wasn’t good.”

Ars Technica: Rising Star found a new species—now it wants to find a new way for paleoanthropology

Terrific article from Ars Technica: Rising Star found a new species—now it wants to find a new way for paleoanthropology. “For most of its history, paleoanthropology has been a science built out of superlatives. Headlines tell us about the oldest fossil. The most complete skeleton. The earliest modern human. These sorts of claims make it easy to assume that the science of human evolution is driven by discovery, and the superlative-laden Rising Star project is proof that there’s a never-ending interest in fossil hominin finds. But science is a social process, and, more than anything else, Rising Star has dared its fellow paleoanthropologists to re-examine how they’re going about the business of doing their science. Homo naledi has had enough cultural cachet to challenge the science of human evolution to be more open and accessible with its data.”

Bloomberg: New Digital Archive Preserves Memories of London’s Greatest Archaeological Discovery

Bloomberg: New Digital Archive Preserves Memories of London’s Greatest Archaeological Discovery. “In 1954, the chance discovery of the remains of a Roman temple to the God Mithras in the rubble of post-war London captured public imagination, with tens of thousands of visitors flocking to the site to marvel at the remains. Today – one year after the restored temple was re-opened to the public at London Mithraeum Bloomberg SPACE – a new digital archive published by Bloomberg and MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) invites the public to explore first-hand accounts of what it was like to be part of London’s greatest archaeological discovery.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists reconstruct pre-Columbian temple with 3D-printed blocks

Ars Technica: Archaeologists reconstruct pre-Columbian temple with 3D-printed blocks. “The unfinished temple in a southern valley of the Lake Titicaca Basin in modern-day Bolivia has been a mystery for at least 500 years. Now known as the Pumapunku—’Door of the Jaguar’ in the Quechua language—the complex stone structure is part of a sprawling complex of pyramids, plazas, and platforms built by a pre-Columbian culture we now call the Tiwanaku. Construction began around 500 CE and proceeded off and on, in phases, over the next few centuries until the Tiwanaku left the site around 900 or 1000 CE.”