3D tour: explore the Great Pyramid (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: 3D tour: explore the Great Pyramid. “Inside the Great Pyramid is a 3D tour of Khufu’s enormous tomb, painstakingly scanned by Luke Hollis. It works just like the ones on real estate websites, but this one’s not for sale at any price (besides, it looks like tweakers already stripped it for copper and anything else shiny).” VERY cool. Click the “Free Explore” link on the top right if you don’t want the tour and you just want to run around in the Pyramid by yourself.

CNET: World’s Oldest Known Map of Stars Found Hiding in Medieval Manuscript

CNET: World’s Oldest Known Map of Stars Found Hiding in Medieval Manuscript. “More than 2,100 years ago, Greek astronomer Hipparchus mapped out the stars — and for a long time, this had been considered humanity’s earliest attempt to assign numerical coordinates to stellar bodies. But despite its fame, the treatise was only known to exist through writings of another well-known astronomer named Claudius Ptolemy, who compiled his own celestial inventory some 400 years later. Until now, that is.”

State of Kentucky: New Discover KY Archaeology Website Profiles Archaeological Sites and Research Across the Commonwealth

State of Kentucky: New Discover KY Archaeology Website Profiles Archaeological Sites and Research Across the Commonwealth. ” A new website highlighting more than 100 prehistoric and historic archaeological sites across 64 counties has been launched by the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office (KHC) in partnership with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC).”

MakeUseOf: How to Explore Ancient Landmarks With Yorescape

New-to-me, from MakeUseOf: How to Explore Ancient Landmarks With Yorescape. “Flyover Zone is a ‘virtual tourism company’ that digitally reconstructs world history sites in 360-degree virtual environments. They’ve been at this for a while now, but a platform and app system called Yorescape collects all of their content and publishes it all in one place.”

Griffith University: Rock art detection via machine learning model a breakthrough

Griffith University: Rock art detection via machine learning model a breakthrough. “Co-led by Dr Andrea Jalandoni, a digital archaeologist from Griffith University’s Centre for Social and Cultural Research, the study used hundreds of images of rock art found within Kakadu National Park to train a ML model to detect whether painted rock art was present within the image. The model achieved an 89% success rate, meaning it determined which images contained rock art the vast majority of times.”

CSUDH: Student Podcast Brings Ancient Maya to Life

CSUDH: Student Podcast Brings Ancient Maya to Life. “What’s the best way to make an ancient civilization accessible to a wide audience? Ask Jackeline and Lesli Hernandez, and they will tell you that podcasting is the key. The two sisters, who both graduated from CSUDH in May with degrees in anthropology, started the podcast ‘Uncovering the Ancient Maya’ in Spring 2022 to provide accurate, historical insights about the Maya to the general public.” The sisters started the podcast with three episodes, but it looks like other students will help it continue.

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy. “An international team led by researchers at McMaster University, working in collaboration with the University of Paris Cité, has identified and reconstructed the first ancient genome of E. coli, using fragments extracted from the gallstone of a 16th century mummy.”

University of Toronto: AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans

University of Toronto: AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans. “The discovery, described in a study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests only the sixth location worldwide of evidence of fire more than half a million years old. The researchers employed advanced artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to confirm their hypothesis. The team suggests the method could lead to a more scientific, data-driven type of archaeology, providing a better understanding of the origins of the human story, our most basic traditions and our experimental and innovative nature.”

Ars Technica: Lidar reveals networks of pre-Columbian cities and towns in Bolivia

Ars Technica: Lidar reveals networks of pre-Columbian cities and towns in Bolivia. “An airborne lidar survey recently revealed the long-hidden ruins of 11 pre-Columbian Indigenous towns in what is now northern Bolivia. The survey also revealed previously unseen details of defensive walls and complex ceremonial buildings at 17 other settlements in the area, built by a culture about which archaeologists still know very little: the Casarabe.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”

Ars Technica: Researchers home in on possible “day zero” for Antikythera mechanism

Ars Technica: Researchers home in on possible “day zero” for Antikythera mechanism. “The mysterious Antikythera mechanism—an ancient device believed to have been used for tracking the heavens—has fascinated scientists and the public alike since it was first recovered from a shipwreck over a century ago. Much progress has been made in recent years to reconstruct the surviving fragments and learn more about how the mechanism might have been used. And now, members of a team of Greek researchers believe they have pinpointed the start date for the Antikythera mechanism, according to a preprint posted to the physics arXiv. Knowing that ‘day zero’ is critical to ensuring the accuracy of the device.”