Departures: New Virtual Experience Will Take You Back 2,000 Years to Visit Ancient Roman Ruins

Departures: New Virtual Experience Will Take You Back 2,000 Years to Visit Ancient Roman Ruins. “Virtual visitors can explore incredible landmarks like the 2,000-year-old Temple of Jupiter that’s perched on 3,000-ton stone blocks (it weighs more than the pillars of Stonehenge). The Temple of Bacchus—one of the best-preserved temples in the ancient world—is also on the Sanctuary tour. Those ruins are some of the most incredible examples of ancient architecture in the entire Roman empire. You’ll get to make a total of 35 stops along the virtual journey.”

Hyperallergic: Listen to the Sounds of an 18,000-year-old Conch

Hyperallergic: Listen to the Sounds of an 18,000-year-old Conch. “Music elites better table your ukuleles and unplug your theremins; science is bringing the noise with the newest in niche musical instruments. Or, more accurately, one of the oldest. A massive conch shell, unearthed by archaeologists in 1931 amid the remains of the Upper Paleolithic Marsoulas cave society, has been recently determined to be a musical instrument.”

San Antonio Report: Archaeologists have recorded 233 ancient art sites along Texas’ border with Mexico. Now they want to discover the meanings behind the murals

San Antonio Report: Archaeologists have recorded 233 ancient art sites along Texas’ border with Mexico. Now they want to discover the meanings behind the murals. “Shumla, a Comstock-based nonprofit focused on locating, studying and preserving the rock art of the lower Pecos River region, has created a virtual library to help researchers interpret the ancient art, much of it located in rough, inaccessible terrain or on private ranchlands. Launched in 2017, the Alexandria Project is a detailed digital archive of 233 rock art sites in the limestone canyonlands carved by the Pecos and Devils rivers and the Rio Grande.”

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire

Getty: See the Faces of People Who Lived in Egypt under the Roman Empire. “In Egypt, it was customary to mummify the deceased and create a likeness of them, often in the form of a mummy mask or an anthropoid (human-form) coffin. From the first to third centuries AD, after Egypt had become a province of the Roman Empire, the traditional practice of mummification continued but a new trend also arose: some individuals chose to be represented in portraits painted on thin wooden panels or linen burial shrouds that were affixed to their mummy wrappings. These mummy portraits were part of ancient Egyptian traditions and their preparations for the afterlife…. Discover more about these mummy portraits and the stories they tell, in the new Google Arts & Culture exhibition: Faces of Roman Egypt.”

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual. “Egyptologists have recently translated the oldest-known mummification manual. Translating it required solving a literal puzzle; the medical text that includes the manual is currently in pieces, with half of what remains in the Louvre Museum in France and half at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. A few sections are completely missing, but what’s left is a treatise on medicinal herbs and skin diseases, especially the ones that cause swelling. Surprisingly, one section of that text includes a short manual on embalming.”

Getty: Online Exhibition Explores Palmyra in English and Arabic

Getty: Online Exhibition Explores Palmyra in English and Arabic. “For centuries the ruins of the ancient city of Palmyra have captured the imagination–testaments to the legacy of the prosperous multicultural center of trade that once dominated the region. Return to Palmyra, a new website presented in English and Arabic, invites audiences to explore the rich history of the city, including an exhibition of rare 18th-century etchings and 19th-century photographs of the site, new scholarship, and a moving interview with Waleed Khaled al-As’ad about the modern-day experience of living and working among the ruins of this storied locale.”

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History: Mongolian Archaeological Project Receives 2 Million Euro Arcadia Grant

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History: Mongolian Archaeological Project Receives 2 Million Euro Arcadia Grant. “Archaeological sites in Mongolia face a range of threats, including climate change and looting. With funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is launching the Mongolian Archaeological Project: Surveying the Steppes (MAPSS). Investigators in Mongolia and Germany will use satellite imagery and existing archival material to create a unified, open access database of Mongolian archaeology.”

Stanford Libraries: Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks

Stanford Libraries: Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks . “A current effort is underway to archive archaeological research documentation from Çatalhöyük — a 9000 year old neolithic settlement in the central plains of Turkey widely recognized as one of the most important archaeological sites in the world — in the Stanford Digital Repository. We have just achieved our first major milestone and released the image collection of about 144,000 images on Searchworks.”

The Art Newspaper: From mummies to mosques—new Google Arts & Culture initiative brings Egypt’s archaeological treasures to the masses

The Art Newspaper: From mummies to mosques—new Google Arts & Culture initiative brings Egypt’s archaeological treasures to the masses. “‘From Pharaonic tombs, to Mamluk mosques, and from Coptic monasteries to Roman villas,’ you can now take online tours of Egypt’s most important archaeological sites. The Google Arts & Culture organisation has teamed up to create the digital platform Preserving Egypt’s Layered History with archaeologists at the American Research Centre in Cairo, revealing ‘stories of the restoration of diverse locations around Egypt’.”

Sapienza University of Rome: Valeteviatores, digitized Latin epigraphs become a historical video game

Sapienza University of Rome, and Google-translated from Italian: Valeteviatores, digitized Latin epigraphs become a historical video game. “The project, coordinated by the University of Navarra, aims to acquire 3D scans of a selection of Latin inscriptions preserved in various Roman cities, from Portugal to Rome, passing through France and Spain, which will then be edited in a historical video game.”

American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato

Thanks to Esther S. for sending this my way. From the American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato. “The American Academy in Rome (AAR) announced that photographer Carole Raddato has gifted the core of her vast collection—some 30,000 digital images—to the AAR Library to ensure its long-term preservation and continued access to scholars. The gift represents the most important collection of images of antiquity to come to the Academy since Ernest Nash’s Fototeca Unione was formed in 1956, and is the first to consist of photos taken wholly in the twenty-first century.”

CoinWeek: National Endowment for Humanities Funds ANS-Oxford University OXUS-INDUS Project

CoinWeek: National Endowment for Humanities Funds ANS-Oxford University OXUS-INDUS Project. “The American Numismatic Society (ANS) is pleased to announce that the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded the Society a $150,000 USD grant for the two-year joint ANS-Oxford University OXUS-INDUS project. The award comes through the New Directions in Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions program that partners the NEH with the United Kingdom’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intended to fund trans-Atlantic co-operative projects.”

Greek Reporter: Tour Ancient Olympia from Home Via New Digital Platform

Greek Reporter: Tour Ancient Olympia from Home Via New Digital Platform. “Created at no cost for the Greek state, the app was developed as part of Microsoft’s ‘AI for Good’ Corporate Social Responsibility program. Not only can users explore ancient Olympia, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the fifth-most visited area in Greece in pre-Covid times, they can also contribute to the platform by adding their own personal content, communicate with other virtual visitors, and even network with others from all around the world.”