Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D (LiveScience)

LiveScience: Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D. “The mountaintop town of Volterra in central Italy witnessed the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Now, researchers are using the latest reality capture technology and software to preserve a 3D digital record of its ancient temples, theaters and other buildings for the future, and to gain new insights into how they were made…. Elements of the reality-capture project, including 3D models of the Etruscan arch and a stone pedestal from Volterra’s Roman theater, are also available to the public at a new website…”

Going Digital: Grant will help Martinsville museum put fossil collection online (Martinsville Bulletin)

Martinsville Bulletin: Going Digital: Grant will help Martinsville museum put fossil collection online. “A grant from the Bureau of Land Management will allow the Virginia Museum of Natural History to catalogue an important fossil collection, soon making it accessible to anyone with internet access. VMNH Assistant Curator of Paleontology Dr. Alex Hastings said that the museum recently received a $43,289 grant from the Bureau of Land Management. According to Hastings, the grant will be used to catalogue and photograph a collection of nearly 5,000 fossil specimens, many of them collected in Montana in the 1990s by Dr. John Happ.”

Telesur: Costa Rica Shows Pre-Columbian Artifacts Returned by Venezuela

Telesur: Costa Rica Shows Pre-Columbian Artifacts Returned by Venezuela. “”This repatriation case of a Costa Rican archeological archive represents a legal milestone in the fight against illicit trafficking of cultural assets in Latin America,” says the National Museum. The National Museum of Costa Rica (MNCR) is exhibiting 196 recovered pre-Columbian artifacts after they were decommissioned in Venezuela between 2010 and 2014 and brought back to the Central American country by sea.”

New York Times: Scanning an Ancient Biblical Text That Humans Fear to Open

New York Times: Scanning an Ancient Biblical Text That Humans Fear to Open. “In a basement laboratory of the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, an X-ray scanner is pumping invisible beams into a clump of charred parchment leaves that looks as delicate as a long dead flower. The leaves are the remains of a severely scorched early book, or codex, which was written in southern Egypt some time between 400 and 600 A.D. It contains the Acts of the Apostles, one of the books of the New Testament, possibly bound with another work. The writing is Coptic, the language of Egypt before the Arab conquest in 642 A.D.”

The Conversation: How virtual reality is opening up some of the world’s most inaccessible archaeological sites

The Conversation: How virtual reality is opening up some of the world’s most inaccessible archaeological sites. “We often associate virtual reality (VR) with thrilling experiences we may never be able to have in real life – such as flying a jet fighter, exploring the oceans or going on a spacewalk. But researchers are also starting to use this technology to study and open up access to archaeological sites that are difficult to get to.”

Phys.org: Scientists pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork

Phys.org: Scientists pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork . “Scientists from UCLA and the National Gallery of Art have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the first to use the specific combination—which they termed “macroscale multimodal chemical imaging”—to examine an ancient work of art. The new technique enabled them to learn about the raw materials the artist used, and the order in which they were applied to the painting, and it uncovered insights about the painting’s connections to other work from the same era.”