ZDNet: Two botnets are fighting over control of thousands of unsecured Android devices

ZDNet: Two botnets are fighting over control of thousands of unsecured Android devices. “Two botnet gangs are fighting to take control over as many unsecured Android devices as they can to use their resources and mine cryptocurrency behind owners’ backs. The turf war between these two botnets –one named Fbot and the other named Trinity– has been going on for at least a month if we’re to combine the various clues from reports published by different cyber-security firms.”

Android At 10: The World’s Most Dominant Technology (The Verge)

The Verge: Android At 10: The World’s Most Dominant Technology. “Android has taken the place in smartphones that Windows once held with desktops: dominant market share. Worldwide, IDC pegs Android’s share at about 85 percent. We can argue about regions and whether enough of those customers are willing to spend money on apps and many other things, but that number is almost too big for nuance. Android is the dominant computing platform on the planet. Not only has Android prevented some version of Windows from taking over mobile, but it has actually eclipsed Windows as the most popular operating system, period.”

The Verge: Google remotely changed the settings on a bunch of phones running Android 9 Pie

The Verge: Google remotely changed the settings on a bunch of phones running Android 9 Pie. “Yesterday a mix of people who own Google Pixel phones and other devices running Android 9 Pie noticed that the software’s Battery Saver feature had been switched on — seemingly all by itself. And oddly, this was happening when the phones were near a full charge, not when the battery was low. As reported by Android Police, initially it was assumed that this was some kind of minor bug in the latest version of Android, which was only released a few weeks ago. Some users thought they might’ve just enabled Battery Saver without realizing. But it was actually Google at fault.”

Ars Technica: Dozens of iOS apps surreptitiously share user location data with tracking firms

Ars Technica: Dozens of iOS apps surreptitiously share user location data with tracking firms. “During preparation for a workshop at DEF CON in August on locating privacy leaks in network traffic, we discovered a number of applications on both iOS and Android that were broadcasting precise location data back to the applications’ developers—in some cases in unencrypted formats. Research released late Friday by Sudo Security’s Guardian mobile firewall team provided some confirmation to our findings—and demonstrated that many apps are sharing location data with firms that market location data information without the users’ knowledge.”

Ars Technica: Fortnite’s Android vulnerability leads to Google/Epic Games spat

Ars Technica: Fortnite’s Android vulnerability leads to Google/Epic Games spat. “Epic Games’ popular shooter Fortnite has been out on Android for just a few weeks, and already there are concrete examples of some of the security fears brought about by the game’s unique distribution method. Google disclosed a vulnerability in the Fortnite Installer that could trick the installer into installing something other than Fortnite.”