Mongabay: Unregulated by U.S. at home, Facebook boosts wildlife trafficking abroad

Mongabay: Unregulated by U.S. at home, Facebook boosts wildlife trafficking abroad. “In a matter of seconds, anyone can find evidence of wildlife trafficking on Facebook, according to independent researchers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) experts. Even using simple search terms returns thousands of posts that offer wildlife and body parts up for sale. Elephant ivory from Thailand, pangolin scales from Vietnam, and sun bears from Malaysia. Tigers, walrus, tortoises, rhinos, sea turtles and shark fins have all been found for sale on the world’s biggest social media platform, even though it says it has banned the trade on its site.”

SNAPSHOT USA: First-ever nationwide mammal survey published (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: SNAPSHOT USA: First-ever nationwide mammal survey published. “How are the squirrels doing this year? The bears? The armadillos? How would you know? A new paper published June 8 sets up the framework for answering these questions across the United States by releasing the data from the first national mammal survey made up of 1,509 motion-activated camera traps from 110 sites located across all 50 states.”

New York Times: What Has Four Legs, a Trunk and a Behavioral Database?

New York Times: What Has Four Legs, a Trunk and a Behavioral Database?. “Over her career, Dr. [Joyce] Poole has spent tens of thousands of hours in the field, observing, tracking and analyzing wild elephants. Now, in a comprehensive project that fellow animal biologists describe as ‘an amazing achievement’ and ‘an immense treasure case,’ Dr. Poole and her husband, Petter Granli, have compiled the fruits of her fieldwork into a vast, publicly available database called the Elephant Ethogram: A Library of African Elephant Behavior.”

From Avocet to Zebra Finch: big data study finds more than 50 billion birds in the world (Phys .org)

Phys .org: From Avocet to Zebra Finch: big data study finds more than 50 billion birds in the world. “There are roughly 50 billion individual birds in the world, a new big data study by UNSW Sydney suggests—about six birds for every human on the planet. The study—which bases its findings on citizen science observations and detailed algorithms—estimates how many birds belong to 9700 different bird species, including flightless birds like emus and penguins.”

EurekAlert: International team partners with UN to launch global initiative to map ungulate migrations

EurekAlert: International team partners with UN to launch global initiative to map ungulate migrations. “An international team of 92 scientists and conservationists has joined forces to create the first-ever global atlas of ungulate (hooved mammal) migrations, working in partnership with the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), a UN treaty. The detailed maps of the seasonal movements of herds worldwide will help governments, indigenous people and local communities, planners and wildlife managers identify current and future threats to migrations, and advance conservation measures to sustain them in the face of an expanding human footprint.”

Wageningen University: New initiative to create global online database with production data from all over the worldanimal

Wageningen University & Research: New initiative to create global online database with animal production data from all over the world. “The Circular Food Systems (CiFoS) project at Wageningen University & Research (WUR) has decided to take the lead in making this data available for everyone by collecting it through an easily accessible online survey. The goal is to develop a global database that becomes an open resource for researchers, policymakers, farmers, businesses and anyone who is interested in the future of animal production.”

Covid: Will your pet need a coronavirus vaccine? (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Will your pet need a coronavirus vaccine?. “…while scientists say there is currently no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the disease to people, infections have been confirmed in various species worldwide. These include dogs, cats, apes and even mink. To address these infections, scientists are developing Covid-19 vaccines that are specially designed for animals.”

EurekAlert: Ever wondered what red foxes eat? There’s a database for that

EurekAlert: Ever wondered what red foxes eat? There’s a database for that. “Research into the diets of a large number of the world’s carnivores has been made publicly available through a free, online database created by a PhD student at the University of Sussex. From stoats in the UK to tigers in India, users are now able to search for detailed information about the diets of species in different geographical locations around the globe.”

Wildlife Conservation Society: WCS Releases Archive of Stunning, Forgotten Historical Wildlife Illustrations

Wildlife Conservation Society: WCS Releases Archive of Stunning, Forgotten Historical Wildlife Illustrations. “The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) released to the public a digital collection of some 2,200 forgotten, historical scientific wildlife illustrations from its Department of Tropical Research (DTR), which it ran from 1916 to 1965. The stunning illustrations include montages of otherworldly deepwater fish, stately portraits of sloths, strange insects, brightly colored birds, snakes, frogs, and other wildlife. Many of the illustrations seem almost whimsical, yet are scientifically accurate.”

News 12: Your social media posts about seals at the Jersey Shore may be hurting the animals

News 12: Your social media posts about seals at the Jersey Shore may be hurting the animals. “Wildlife experts say that the fastest-growing threats to these seals are humans looking for social media likes. Center workers say that they are seeing a disturbing increase in the number of people getting closer than the 150-foot minimum distance allowed by federal law – mostly to take pictures for Instagram and Facebook.”

Scientific American: ‘March Mammal Madness’ Brings Simulated Animal Fights to Huge Audiences

Scientific American: ‘March Mammal Madness’ Brings Simulated Animal Fights to Huge Audiences. “Ever idly wondered if a capybara could somehow take down an elephant in a beachfront brawl? That’s the kind of thinking behind March Mammal Madness (MMM), an annual social media event based on the March Madness NCAA Men’s College Basketball Tournament. Like its namesake, this educational project encourages viewers to fill out brackets predicting which teams would triumph in a hypothetical head-to-head showdown—with the ‘teams’ in this version being specific mammals.”