Associated Press: Body parts from threatened wildlife widely sold on Facebook

Associated Press: Body parts from threatened wildlife widely sold on Facebook. “Facebook is displaying advertisements for well-known American corporations on group pages operated by overseas wildlife traffickers illegally selling the body parts of threatened animals, including elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger teeth. In a secret complaint filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, wildlife preservation advocates allege that Facebook’s failure to stop illicit traders using its service for illegal activity violates the social network’s responsibilities as a publicly traded company.”

IEEE Spectrum: Russian Astronauts Prepare to Bring the ‘Internet of Animals’ Online

IEEE Spectrum: Russian Astronauts Prepare to Bring the ‘Internet of Animals’ Online. “An ambitious project to keep an eye on thousands of animals and birds from space in a sort of ‘Internet of Animals’ is getting ready to kick off. In February, German researchers sent three large 200-kilogram antennas to the International Space Station (ISS) on a Soyuz rocket. The antennas joined a computer that had been sent up in October. These pieces will be the ears and brain of ICARUS, short for International Cooperation for Animal Research Using Space, an initiative funded by the Russian and German space agencies to track the movement of the smallest animals—birds, turtles, fish, and even insects—and tap into swarm intelligence.”

NPR: 21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife Trafficking

NPR: 21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife Trafficking. “The Global Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online, organized by Google and the World Wildlife Fund, was announced Wednesday morning. It includes companies such as Alibaba, Baidu, eBay, Facebook, Instagram and Microsoft, and they’re pledging to ‘work together to collectively reduce wildlife trafficking across platforms by 80% by 2020.'”

MSN: Saudi Arabia to create database on camels through microchip implants

MSN: Saudi Arabia to create database on camels through microchip implants. “The Council of Ministers recently approved an ambitious project to create a national database for tracking camels via subcutaneous implanted rice-grain-size microchips, according to the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).”

Google Blog: Take a walk on the wild side in Google Earth

Google Blog: Take a walk on the wild side in Google Earth. “This World Wildlife Day, become one with nature—and its animal inhabitants—on Voyager, Google Earth’s storytelling feature. We’ve launched three interactive tours with Explore.org, National Geographic Society and The Nature Conservancy that let you get up close with our planet’s magnificent animals and the challenges they face.”

Business Insider: There’s now a giant database for rare zoo animals to find a mate that works just like a dating app

Business Insider: There’s now a giant database for rare zoo animals to find a mate that works just like a dating app. “Rare animals can now have profiles uploaded to a global database called the Zoological Information Management System. According to The Times newspaper, more than a thousand paper ‘studbook’ animal records are in the process of being added to the database, which covers 22,000 species. The data transfer is due to take around two years.”

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’. “Musicians have long drawn inspiration from nature, but a new online game is taking that connection one step further. ‘Beastbox’ takes sound clips from real wild animals, transforms them into loops, and allows users to mix and match them into an endless variety of beats, breaks and drops. Along the way, players learn about the animals and the ecosystems they belong to.”