The Star: German court rules Facebook settings violate data protection laws

The Star: German court rules Facebook settings violate data protection laws. “The Berlin state court ruled in a suit brought by the Federation of German Consumer Organizations that Facebook’s ‘real name’ clause violated the country’s regulation that providers of online services must allow users to remain anonymous.”

The Grand Tor: How To Go Anonymous Online (Wired)

Wired: The Grand Tor: How To Go Anonymous Online. (Fifty points for the headline.) “Earlier this month, Tor announced an update to its so-called onion services, which use Tor’s anonymizing features to hide not just individual people on the web, but servers too, allowing for so-called dark web or darknet sites and other services that can’t be physically traced to any locatable computer. Beyond merely covering your tracks as you visit websites, the new feature has opened Tor up to a new range of applications, enabling a new generation of whistleblowing platforms and new forms of untraceable messaging…. Here’s how you can use Tor today, whether you want to want to browse controversial sites in peace, or send messages the NSA can’t peep.”

Digital Trends: Wikipedia can now be found on the dark web

Digital Trends: Wikipedia can now be found on the dark web. “Wikipedia, for all the issues it has, is still an invaluable resource for many people. While it’s true that you should be careful about citing it in a research paper, the site remains a great resource to get a general overview of a topic and find more in-depth resources. In the United States and nations with similar freedoms, we often take Wikipedia for granted, but there are many parts of the world where accessing the site can be very difficult and illegal. In order to help at-risk users access the site, cyber security expert Alex Muffett has created a version of the website for the dark web accessible by the Tor browser.” Is this ringing a bell for you? Possibly because Wikipedia folks have been asking that this be done.

The Register: Biggest Tor overhaul in a decade adds layers of security improvements

The Register: Biggest Tor overhaul in a decade adds layers of security improvements. “Tor developers have taken the wraps off the next generation of Onion Services. The alpha release promises the biggest overhaul in the anonymity service for the last 10 years. The opening section of the change log provides a good overview of the tweaks, some of which aim to address recently discovered security weaknesses in the protocol, such as the potential for rogue nodes to learn about the network.”

The Verge: Russia’s social media meddling could spell the end of online anonymity

The Verge: Russia’s social media meddling could spell the end of online anonymity. “This week, representatives from Google, Facebook, and Twitter are appearing before House and Senate subcommittees to answer for their role in Russian manipulation during the 2016 election, and so far, the questioning has been brutal. Facebook has taken the bulk of the heat, being publicly called out by members of Congress for missing a wave of Russian activity until months after the election. But one of the most interesting parts of yesterday’s proceedings actually came after the big companies had left the room, and a national security researcher named Clint Watts took the floor.”

TechCrunch: How “anonymous” wifi data can still be a privacy risk

TechCrunch: How “anonymous” wifi data can still be a privacy risk. “The thorny issue of tracking of location data without risking individual privacy is very neatly illustrated via a Freedom of Information (FOI) request asking London’s transport regulator to release the ‘anonymized’ data-set it generated from a four week trial last year when it tracked metro users in the UK capital via wi-fi nodes and the MAC address of their smartphones as they traveled around its network.”