Ars Technica: Anonymous “Anonymous Cowards” are, for now, not welcome on Slashdot

Ars Technica: Anonymous “Anonymous Cowards” are, for now, not welcome on Slashdot . “On August 9, tech news aggregator Slashdot quietly removed one of its earliest features, which had been available to all visitors since its founding in 1997: the ability to post comments as an ‘Anonymous Coward.’ And while the feature returned within five days, it returned in a largely nerfed format.”

Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age? (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age?. “Lifelong anonymity orders for adults who were convicted of crimes as children are rarely granted. In theory, these orders legally prevent a person ever being identified. But given that information is now shared at lightning speed across different platforms, can these orders still work in practice?”

Rapsi News: E-mail user identification bill submitted to Russia’s lower house of parliament

Rapsi News: E-mail user identification bill submitted to Russia’s lower house of parliament . “A group of members of the Federation Council introduced a bill on e-mail user identification to the State Duma. The document was published Tuesday on the database of the parliament’s lower house.”

The New York Times: In Hong Kong Protests, Faces Become Weapons

The New York Times: In Hong Kong Protests, Faces Become Weapons. “As Hong Kong convulses amid weeks of protests, demonstrators and the police have turned identity into a weapon. The authorities are tracking protest leaders online and seeking their phones. Many protesters now cover their faces, and they fear that the police are using cameras and possibly other tools to single out targets for arrest.”

EurekAlert: Anonymizing personal data ‘not enough to protect privacy,’ shows new study

EurekAlert: Anonymizing personal data ‘not enough to protect privacy,’ shows new study. “With the first large fines for breaching EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulations upon us, and the UK government about to review GDPR guidelines, researchers have shown how even anonymised datasets can be traced back to individuals using machine learning.”

The Next Web: Anonymous chat apps fuels both free speech and cyberbullying

The Next Web: Anonymous chat apps fuels both free speech and cyberbullying. “The problem with anonymous apps is the torrent of reports of cyberbullying, harassment, and threats that appear to be even more of a feature than in regular social networks. Psychologist John Suler, who specializes in online behavior, describes this phenomenon as the ‘online disinhibition effect’. This means people feel less accountable for their actions when they feel removed from their real identities.”