The Next Web: A brief history of YikYak — the anon platform making its return

The Next Web: A brief history of YikYak — the anon platform making its return. “Yik Yak is back! If you don’t know what it is, I don’t blame you. It was an anonymous gossip platform that had some success, but after running into moderation problems and failing to deal with problematic content, it was shut down in 2017. The company announced on Twitter that it’s making a comeback with an iOS app. But before we get into that, let’s take a look at the brief history of the social network.”

9to5 Google: Google Chrome is redesigning the Incognito tab, possibly in response to $5 billion lawsuit

9to5 Google: Google Chrome is redesigning the Incognito tab, possibly in response to $5 billion lawsuit. “Live now in the Canary version of Chrome on Android, a new Incognito tab design is being implemented by Google. As the folks over at TechDows found, this appeared just this week. The ‘Revamped Incognito New Tab Page’ is disabled by default, but eventually may replace the current incognito UI on Android, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, and Mac versions of the world’s most popular browser.”

Twitter: Racist tweets after Euros final didn’t rely on anonymity (CNET)

CNET: Twitter: Racist tweets after Euros final didn’t rely on anonymity. “If you’ve never been a victim of online abuse, it would be easy to assume that perpetrators of such abuse hide behind anonymous avatars and usernames that obscure their real identities. But that’s not the case. Twitter revealed in a blog post Tuesday that when England’s footballers were targeted by racist abuse last month after they lost the Euro Cup final, 99% of the accounts it suspended were not anonymous.”

New York Times: You Anon

New York Times: You Anon. “After a decade in which online identity came under increasingly centralized control, in which various digital and offline identities were mingled, and during which personal data became a hot global commodity, control over one’s identity is starting to look more like a threatened privilege than a right. To exist online is to be constantly asked to show yourself.”

Motherboard: Inside the Industry That Unmasks People At Scale

Motherboard: Inside the Industry That Unmasks People At Scale. “Tech companies have repeatedly reassured the public that trackers used to follow smartphone users through apps are anonymous or at least pseudonymous, not directly identifying the person using the phone. But what they don’t mention is that an entire overlooked industry exists to purposefully and explicitly shatter that anonymity.”

Who Is rg_bunny1: An Instagram Whodunit (New York Times)

New York Times: Who Is rg_bunny1: An Instagram Whodunit. “It is the parlor game of the pandemic. Among a certain segment of the scrolling classes, art and literary division, firing up their tablets and smartphones each morning has taken on aspects of a whodunit. Rifling through Instagram feeds, they register with half yawns the sponsored posts and thirst traps, the Throwback Thursday selfies and banal memes of cats. All the while they are waiting to happen upon the latest clue from a particular account.”

Bustle: 3 Sneaky Hacks To Watch Instagram Stories Anonymously

Bustle: 3 Sneaky Hacks To Watch Instagram Stories Anonymously. “The ability to check out who has viewed your Instagram Story is a double edged sword — pretty satisfying when it’s your Story, and pretty exposing when you’re on the other side. Though you might enjoy being able to see who is watching your Stories, you’ve likely wondered how to watch other people’s Instagram Stories anonymously.”

SecurityWeek: Flaws in Apple Location Tracking System Could Lead to User Identification

SecurityWeek: Flaws in Apple Location Tracking System Could Lead to User Identification. “Vulnerabilities identified in offline finding (OF) — Apple’s proprietary crowd-sourced location tracking system — could be abused for user identification, researchers said in a report released this month. Introduced in 2019, the system relies on the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology for the detection of ‘lost’ devices, and on the Internet connection of so-called ‘finder’ devices to report on their location back to the owner.”

Social Media: Should people be allowed to be anonymous online? (BBC)

BBC: Social Media: Should people be allowed to be anonymous online?. “People are suggesting social media platforms should make their users sign in with formal identification such as driving licence or passport to make it easier for the police to identify people who commit hate crimes and also discourage people from posting abuse in the first place. However, there are fears that this would be giving social media companies too much personal data and could also pose a threat to activists, whistleblowers (who are people that reveal information about bad things people or companies have done) and persecuted minorities who need to protect their identity online. So what are the positives and negatives of being anonymous online?”

Techdirt: Judge Forbids Facebook Users Being Sued By A Cop From Publishing The Cop’s Name On Social Media

Techdirt: Judge Forbids Facebook Users Being Sued By A Cop From Publishing The Cop’s Name On Social Media. “Eugene Volokh reports an Ohio court has hit a number of defendants in a libel lawsuit with an unconstitutional order forbidding them from posting the name of the man suing them. It’s no ordinary man, though. It’s a police officer who several attendees of a Cincinnati city council meeting have both identified and claimed used a racist hand sign while interacting with them.”

OneZero: A Pseudonym Helped Me Cultivate a Healthier Relationship With Social Media

OneZero: A Pseudonym Helped Me Cultivate a Healthier Relationship With Social Media. “We face a universal problem: how to manage your personal and professional identities. How much is too much when it comes to what you share? How much do you rely on social media to manage your life or to fill a void? It all comes down to boundaries. Boundaries are about building imaginary fences around real things.”

Palo Alto Online: Anonymous Confessions pages are surging in popularity on high school and college campuses. Why?

Palo Alto Online: Anonymous Confessions pages are surging in popularity on high school and college campuses. Why?. “In September, [Sergio] Charles started Cardinal Confessions, a Facebook page for students to anonymously share confessions of all kinds, both light-hearted and serious — stress, insecurities, relationship angst, questions about a course or grades, politics, campus gossip. He wanted to create a positive online community that would open up real-life conversations and create connections on a campus well-known for ‘duck syndrome’ — a metaphor for students, like ducks, acting calm on the surface but paddling furiously to stay afloat (even though ducks are inherently buoyant).”

Motherboard: Leaked Document Shows How Big Companies Buy Credit Card Data on Millions of Americans

Motherboard: Leaked Document Shows How Big Companies Buy Credit Card Data on Millions of Americans. “Yodlee, the largest financial data broker in the U.S., sells data pulled from the bank and credit card transactions of tens of millions of Americans to investment and research firms, detailing where and when people shopped and how much they spent. The company claims that the data is anonymous, but a confidential Yodlee document obtained by Motherboard indicates individual users could be unmasked.”