Drexel University: Drexel Unveils ‘Museum of Where We Are’ Exhibition of Design History Students’ Work

Drexel University: Drexel Unveils ‘Museum of Where We Are’ Exhibition of Design History Students’ Work. “Joseph Larnerd, PhD, assistant professor of design history in the Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, started his ‘The Museum of Where We Are’ online project as a way to continue facets of hands-on learning in his ‘ARTH 300: The History of Modern Design’ class after all University coursework went remote in spring 2020 due to the pandemic. He had students select an object from their current place of residence, and over the course of the term, conceptualize and research a label for that object like one would find in a museum.”

The Justice: Open-access journal will join JSTOR Archive after fall issue

The Justice: Open-access journal will join JSTOR Archive after fall issue. “CASTE: A Global Journal on Social Exclusion (J-CASTE), an open-access journal developed by Laurence Simon, Professor of International Development and Director of the Center for Global Development (Heller), will join the JSTOR Archive following the publication of its upcoming fall issue…. Since CASTE’s early days of development, the journal has stayed loyal to its original message, Simon said. The journal mainly examines social policies aimed towards countering exclusion and intolerance in multiple spheres, and authors featured in the journal include scholars of philosophy and ethics, theology and culture, sociology and anthropology, economics, law, health, literature and art among others.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Offers Grants to Support Contemporary Cultural Field Research within Diverse Communities

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Offers Grants to Support Contemporary Cultural Field Research within Diverse Communities. “The Library of Congress is offering a new series of grants to individuals and organizations working to document cultures and traditions of Black, Indigenous, and communities of color traditionally underrepresented in the United States.”

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’

Phys .org: Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by ‘linguistic thermometer’. “Multi-disciplinary researchers at The University of Manchester have helped develop a powerful physics-based tool to map the pace of language development and human innovation over thousands of years—even stretching into pre-history before records were kept.”

University of Toronto: Armed with 3D scanners, U of T anthropologists ready hundreds of fossils for virtual labs

University of Toronto: Armed with 3D scanners, U of T anthropologists ready hundreds of fossils for virtual labs. “In a small room at the Terrence Donnelly Health Science Complex at the University of Toronto Mississauga, a cast of a hominin skull is carefully being scanned. Its prominent features, distinguishing characteristics and even the smallest surface details are all replicated in exacting detail as part of a project that’s bringing fossils into the digital realm. The skull is one of hundreds of specimens being added to an online 3D digital database for anthropology students who can’t access bone casts and fossils in person due to the pandemic.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Help Transcribe Field Notes Penned by S. Ann Dunham, a Pioneering Anthropologist and Barack Obama’s Mother

Smithsonian Magazine: Help Transcribe Field Notes Penned by S. Ann Dunham, a Pioneering Anthropologist and Barack Obama’s Mother. “The S. Ann Dunham papers, 1965-2013, were donated to the NAA in 2013 by Dunham’s daughter, Maya Soetoro-Ng. The donation included field notebooks, correspondence, reports, research proposals, case studies, surveys, lectures, photographs, research files and floppy disks document of Dunham’s dissertation research on blacksmithing, and her professional work as a consultant for organizations like the Ford Foundation and Bank Raykat Indonesia (BRI). Beginning today, the public can contribute to the NAA’s effort to transcribe Dunham’s field notes.”

Arizona State University: ASU researchers launch blog series exploring equitable research practices

Arizona State University: ASU researchers launch blog series exploring equitable research practices. “As public attention has turned to systemic inequities in institutional cultures like those in police forces, medical care, school systems and food production, some researchers at Arizona State University are turning their attention to academic culture to explore how researchers might embody more equitable research practices. This week, ASU postdoctoral scholar Schuyler Marquez launched a new series, ‘Embodying Reciprocity: Relationality and Redistribution in Anthropology,’ on the collaborative blog Footnotes, along with ASU doctoral candidate Taylor Genovese and University of Chicago doctoral candidate Sonia Grant.”

Data discoveries: could social media become a tool to study economic recovery? (Geographical)

Geographical: Data discoveries: could social media become a tool to study economic recovery?. “In flagrant disregard of government advice, many American citizens took to the streets in April to claim that draconian lockdown measures impinged on their civil liberties, and more prominently, their businesses. To combat the financial peril of small businesses, the UK government will have to borrow an unprecedented 38 per cent of the year’s GDP if social distancing measures are in place until the end of 2020, according to the Resolution Foundation. As uncertainty rages, it’s vital to understand how economies recover from crises.”

The University of Washington Daily: The complexities of the Anthropocene through multimedia, vampires, and pig farms

The University of Washington Daily: The complexities of the Anthropocene through multimedia, vampires, and pig farms. “Anna Tsing, professor of anthropology at UC Santa Cruz, presented a lecture Feb. 25 as part of the Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities series. The talk featured insights from her new book ‘Feral Atlas and the More-Than-Human Anthropocene.’ Feral Atlas will also be appearing online as an interactive digital medium that explores ecosystems that have been changed and expanded by human facilitation.”

Phys .org: Big data could yield big discoveries in archaeology, scholar says

Phys .org: Big data could yield big discoveries in archaeology, scholar says. “In a recently released edition of the Journal of Field Archaeology, Brown Assistant Professor of Anthropology Parker VanValkenburgh and several colleagues detailed new research they conducted in the former Inca Empire in South America using drones, satellite imagery and proprietary online databases. Their results demonstrate that big data can provide archaeologists with a sweeping, big-picture view of the subjects they study on the ground—prompting new insights and new historical questions.”

Phys .org: Anthropologist digitizes a changing culture from half a world away

Phys .org: Anthropologist digitizes a changing culture from half a world away. “In 2006, University of Virginia anthropologist Lise Dobrin received a document attached to an email from a man she knew in Papua New Guinea, where she had conducted fieldwork for her dissertation several years earlier. The document told the story of the history of the man’s village. He wrote that he was afraid if he didn’t write it, no one else would.”

H-Announce: Digitized Field Recordings of Lorenzo Dow Turner

H-Announce: Digitized Field Recordings of Lorenzo Dow Turner. “The project digitized close to 40 hours of field recordings made by African American academic and linguist Lorenzo Dow Turner, known as the ‘Father of Gullah Studies.’ The recordings were made between 1932 and 1952, and cover a variety of geographical locations, from Nigeria and Cameroon to Brazil, as well as locations within the United States, where Turner encountered native speakers of Yoruba, Igbo, Portuguese, English, Creole and Gullah among other languages and various dialects. Turner used these recordings as evidence to trace the linguistic and cultural connections between West Africa and the Americas.”

UCLA: Ethnomusicology Archive publishes 58 historical field collections online

UCLA: Ethnomusicology Archive publishes 58 historical field collections online. “Five years of planning and development across international waters have culminated in the online publication of 58 historical field collections held by the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive. The project, Ethnomusicology: Global Field Recordings, was a collaboration between the World Music Center at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, home of the archive, and Adam Matthew Digital, an academic publisher based in the United Kingdom.”

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar. “While music seems to be everywhere, scientists haven’t previously found much evidence to suggest it has any universal features. The prevailing view is that music is so diverse that few, if any, universals exist. Settling the matter empirically has been difficult, because research often focuses on individual cultures and musical contexts, says Samuel Mehr of Harvard University. So Mehr and his colleagues decided to use data science to try to understand what was universal and what varied in music across the world. To do this, they developed a database containing around 5000 detailed descriptions of songs and their performances in 60 human societies.”