Engadget: YouTube accused of using return-to-office policies to thwart union organizers

Engadget: YouTube accused of using return-to-office policies to thwart union organizers. “YouTube Music contractors in the Austin area who voted to unionize are accusing their employers of abusing return-to-office policies to stifle labor organizers. The Alphabet Workers Union (AWU) has filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) alleging that YouTube parent Alphabet and staffing firm Cognizant are using an abrupt return-to-office move, due in February, to punish remote workers, many of whom are reportedly pro-union.”

The Register: Google cut contractors off from online ‘Share My Salary’ spreadsheet, union claims

The Register: Google cut contractors off from online ‘Share My Salary’ spreadsheet, union claims. “The Alphabet Workers Union (AWU) claims the company blocked access to a shared spreadsheet in which it reckons “hundreds” of subcontracted workers had shared their salary details and ‘up to 50,000’ of those staffers are now prevented from looking them up.”

WIRED: A Lawsuit Against Meta Shows the Emptiness of Social Enterprises

WIRED: A Lawsuit Against Meta Shows the Emptiness of Social Enterprises. “EARLIER THIS YEAR, Meta and its largest content moderation partner in Africa, Sama, were accused of union busting, forced labor, and human trafficking. The lawsuit claims that ‘misleading job ads’ lured potential employees from across Africa who, once realizing the true nature of the work, often had no means to get home. And when content moderator Daniel Motaung attempted to organize his colleagues for better working conditions and pay, Sama fired him.”

Washington Post: The worker revolt comes to a Dollar General in Connecticut

Washington Post: The worker revolt comes to a Dollar General in Connecticut. “The afternoon shift workers at Dollar General No. 18060 had listened with growing panic as an executive accused their store manager of stealing. They could hear the yelling and threats in the back office, a scene that had shaken all of them — especially Shellie Parsons. In a life marked by poverty, addiction and physical abuse, Parsons, 37, had come to see her store — a beige prefabricated building on the outskirts of town — as her haven, a $15.75-an-hour pathway to a better life. She was desperately afraid of losing it.”

Engadget: NLRB expands its Google complaint for alleged retaliatory dismissals

Engadget: NLRB expands its Google complaint for alleged retaliatory dismissals. “The US National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is expanding its complaint against Google to include three additional former employees of the company, according to Recode. When the agency first accused the search giant of illegally firing some of its workers for organizing, it took up the cases of two individuals.”

Gizmodo: There’s Something Fishy About Amazon’s Anti-Union Twitter Army [Updated]

Gizmodo: There’s Something Fishy About Amazon’s Anti-Union Twitter Army [Updated]. “Have you noticed a strange army of Amazon employees on Twitter recently, claiming that Amazon doesn’t engage in union-busting and disputing stories that workers sometimes have to piss in bottles? Many Twitter users are wondering whether the people are even real. And while there’s some evidence these people could be real, at least one of their photos appear to be fake.”

The Verge: Twitch, owned by Amazon, pulls Amazon’s anti-union ads

The Verge: Twitch, owned by Amazon, pulls Amazon’s anti-union ads. “Twitch is removing the anti-union ads that its parent company, Amazon, was running on the platform. The ads showed Amazon employees talking about why they want to vote no on unionization and directed viewers to Amazon’s ‘DoItWithoutDues’ website. A Twitch spokesperson said the ads ‘should never have been allowed to run on [the] service,’ as they violate its political advertising policies.”

Cornell Chronicle: Digitized files give rare glimpse of anti-union advocacy

Cornell Chronicle: Digitized files give rare glimpse of anti-union advocacy. “When companies go toe to toe with labor unions, they call people like Leonard C. Scott, a former human resource and labor relations executive who also served as a consultant specializing in fighting unions and preventing them from forming in the first place. Cornell University Library’s Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives in Catherwood Library, in the ILR School, recently digitized the anti-union files, dating from 1966 to 2013, that were donated by Scott in 2007. These files, which provide a rare insider’s view of anti-union advocacy, are now fully accessible online.

Motherboard: Amazon Is Spying on Its Workers in Closed Facebook Groups, Internal Reports Show

Motherboard: Amazon Is Spying on Its Workers in Closed Facebook Groups, Internal Reports Show. “Amazon is monitoring the conversations of Amazon Flex drivers in dozens of private Facebook groups in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Spain, according to an internal web tool and reports left on the open internet and viewed by Motherboard. According to the files left online, Amazon corporate employees are getting regular reports about the social media posts of its Flex drivers on nominally private pages, and are using these reports to diagnose problems as well as monitor, for example, drivers ‘planning for any strike or protest against Amazon.’”

The Guardian: Jailed for a Facebook post: garment workers’ rights at risk during Covid-19

The Guardian: Jailed for a Facebook post: garment workers’ rights at risk during Covid-19. “Several leading European fashion brands have launched investigations into allegations that factories in Myanmar are suppressing union activity under the guise of redundancies due to Covid-19 disruption. Workers in at least three factories making clothes for Zara, Primark and Mango have told the Guardian that managers are using Covid-19 disruptions as an excuse to dismiss hundreds of union members at different factories across the country.”