Anxiety, depression and PTSD: The hidden epidemic of data breaches and cyber crimes (USA Today)

USA Today: Anxiety, depression and PTSD: The hidden epidemic of data breaches and cyber crimes. “It’s not just the nightmarish process of clearing your name and credit history or the struggle to get credit or loans, housing, employment or medical services after a breach. Victims wrestle with feelings of powerlessness and vulnerability. Their sleep can be disrupted, energy levels decrease. They self-medicate with alcohol, drugs or food. For some, the aftereffects are more severe: bouts of depression and anxiety, even post-traumatic stress disorder.”

ZDNet: 2020 election news survival guide: Keep your sanity and your friends with these three apps

ZDNet: 2020 election news survival guide: Keep your sanity and your friends with these three apps. “Has the 2020 election news cycle got you anxious, depressed, confused, or just plain exhausted? Have you started hating friends and mistrusting most of what you read? Well, there are some apps I recommend. Really.”

New York Times: Panicking About Your Kids’ Phones? New Research Says Don’t

New York Times: Panicking About Your Kids’ Phones? New Research Says Don’t. “It has become common wisdom that too much time spent on smartphones and social media is responsible for a recent spike in anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, especially among teenagers. But a growing number of academic researchers have produced studies that suggest the common wisdom is wrong.”

Newswise: study shows overall time on social media is not related to teen anxiety and depression

Newswise: study shows overall time on social media is not related to teen anxiety and depression. “The amount of time teenagers spend on social networking sites has risen 62.5 percent since 2012 and continues to grow. Just last year, the average time teenagers spent on social media was estimated as 2.6 hours per day. Critics have claimed that more screen time is increasing depression and anxiety in teenagers. However, new research led by Sarah Coyne, a professor of family life at Brigham Young University, found that the amount of time spent on social media is not directly increasing anxiety or depression in teenagers.”

CNET: Memes on Instagram, Reddit bring comfort to people struggling with depression

CNET: Memes on Instagram, Reddit bring comfort to people struggling with depression. “Memes tackling existential crises and mental health have become an outlet for people seeking light in even the darkest struggles. Topics like depression, debt and failed relationships are regularly explored on meme pages on Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and Twitter. The memes help to defuse situations with humor and to reinforce common experiences, bringing people from all walks of life together.”

Wired: Anxiously Seeking the Perfect Anti-Anxiety App

Wired: Anxiously Seeking the Perfect Anti-Anxiety App. “When I’m having a bout of anxiety, or even just an avoidant feeling (that is probably the precursor to a bout of anxiety), I pull out my phone to distract myself. In bed, when I can’t sleep (which is often) I’ll scroll through Instagram. In the morning, to stave off errands or work, I’ll scan Twitter. At some point, when I’m scrolling and liking, any app I have opened to relieve anxiety begins to give me anxiety of its own.”