The Verge: Google launches Ripple, an open standard that could bring tiny radars to Ford cars and more

The Verge: Google launches Ripple, an open standard that could bring tiny radars to Ford cars and more. “Google has been publicly building tiny radar chips since 2015. They can tell you how well you sleep, control a smartwatch, count sheets of paper, and let you play the world’s tiniest violin. But the company’s Soli radar hasn’t necessarily had commercial success, most prominently featuring in an ill-fated Pixel phone. Now, Google has launched an open-source API standard called Ripple that could theoretically bring the tech to additional devices outside Google — perhaps even a car, as Ford is one of the participants in the new standard.”

TechCrunch: Facebook’s new academic research API opens in early access

TechCrunch: Facebook’s new academic research API opens in early access. “This week, a handful of academic researcher teams will gain access to a new tool from Facebook designed to aggregate near-universal real-time data on the world’s biggest social network. When it comes to who gets access to Facebook data and how, the company now known as Meta is still feeling reverberations from 2018’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which a political consulting firm harvested the personal data of millions of unaware Facebook users to build detailed profiles on potential voters.”

VentureBeat: Synthesis AI offers API for virtual humans

VentureBeat: Synthesis AI offers API for virtual humans. “Synthesis AI, a synthetic data company, has released HumanAPI, a new tool for generating virtual humans from synthetic data. Virtual humans are photorealistic digital representations of people who will move, talk, and behave like real humans in a virtual environment. These virtual humans are meant to help developers improve AI application developments.”

Bing Blogs: IndexNow – Instantly Index your web content in Search Engines

Bing Blogs: IndexNow – Instantly Index your web content in Search Engines. “IndexNow is a new protocol created by Microsoft Bing and Yandex, allowing websites to easily notify search engines whenever their website content is created, updated, or deleted. Using an API, once search engines are notified of updates they quickly crawl and reflect website changes in their index and search results.”

TechCrunch: Grammarly SDK beta lets developers embed automated text editing in any web app

TechCrunch: Grammarly SDK beta lets developers embed automated text editing in any web app. “Grammarly, the popular auto editing tool, announced the release of Grammarly for Developers today. The company is starting this effort with the Text Editor SDK (software development kit), which enables programmers to embed Grammarly text editing functionality into any web application.”

Digital Inspiration: How to Use Notion with Gmail and Google Sheets using Apps Script

Digital Inspiration: How to Use Notion with Gmail and Google Sheets using Apps Script. I hear from friends that they’re using Notion but I haven’t tried it yet. You? “Notion, my absolute favorite tool for storing all sorts of things from web pages to code snippets to recipes, just got better. They’ve released a public API and thus it will be a lot easier for developers to read and write to their Notion workspace from external apps.”

Bing Blogs: Bing Search APIs are Transitioning

Bing Blogs: Bing Search APIs are Transitioning. “To reach out to wider audiences, Bing Search APIs will be transitioning from Azure Cognitive Services Platform to Azure Marketplace. Beginning October 31st, 2020, provisioning of any new instances of Bing Search APIs will need to be done via Azure Marketplace. All existing instances of Bing Search APIs, provisioned under Azure Cognitive Services, will be supported up to the next three years or till the end of the customer’s enterprise agreement, whichever happens first.”

TNW: Twitter’s new API encourages devs to craft powerful third-party apps and useful bots

TNW: Twitter’s new API encourages devs to craft powerful third-party apps and useful bots. “Twitter‘s had a rocky relationship with third-party developers creating apps on top of the service. Over the years, it has introduced limitations for apps such as the active number of tokens and the number of actions (you know, tweets, retweets, likes, and DMs) within a time frame, making it difficult to craft things like alternative Twitter clients. But Twitter wants to put all that in the past, as it launched its new API last night. The company now wants to play fair with developers and even encourage them to make helpful bots.” Fool me once, etc etc. Pouring one out for ListiMonkey.

The Register: Babe, I’ve changed! Twitter wants to try a relationship again with devs after first major API tweaks in years

The Register: Babe, I’ve changed! Twitter wants to try a relationship again with devs after first major API tweaks in years. “For the first time in eight years, Twitter plans to introduce a major revision to its API that describes how developers can access the platform’s data. In doing so, the shouty social network is making yet another attempt to stabilize its development platform and earn the trust of individual, academic, and corporate coders whose software might just make the company more valuable.”

ProgrammableWeb: ProgrammableWeb Launches Covid-19/Coronavirus Developer Resource Center

Tip o’ the nib to Esther S. for this one from ProgrammableWeb: ProgrammableWeb Launches Covid-19/Coronavirus Developer Resource Center. “ProgrammableWeb has launched a special resource center to help developers find the top COVID-19 related APIs and other appdev resources. The content in this resource center is curated by the ProgrammableWeb staff and is designed to provide developers with the most up to date information and tools to help them build solutions related to the coronavirus pandemic. These could be tracking solutions, reporting solutions or any type of innovation that these resources might inspire.”

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight. “Submitting a joint ‘friend of the court’ brief on Monday — a legal document that offers information that has a bearing on the issues of a court case — Mozilla, Medium, Cloudera, Reddit, along with others, have pleaded for SCOTUS to reverse the Federal Court’s decision and allow for APIs to continue to be free from copyright, or at least be available for fair use.”

Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Why NUKEMAP isn’t on Google Maps anymore

Nuclear Secrecy Blog: Why NUKEMAP isn’t on Google Maps anymore. “When I created the NUKEMAP in 2012, the Google Maps API was amazing. It was the best thing in town for creating Javascript mapping mash-ups, cost literally nothing, had an active developer community that added new features on a regular basis, and actually seemed like it was interested in people using their product to develop cool, useful tools. Today, pretty much all of that is now untrue.”

Techdirt: The Good And The Bad Of The ACCESS Act To Force Open APIs On Big Social Media

Techdirt: The Good And The Bad Of The ACCESS Act To Force Open APIs On Big Social Media. “As people here will probably know, I am a huge proponent of a “protocols, not platforms” approach to handling questions around big tech and competition (as well as privacy, content moderation and more). I even wrote a pretty long paper about it for the Knight 1st Amendment Institute at Columbia University entitled Protocols, Not Platforms: A Technological Approach to Free Speech. So, I was definitely curious to see what Senators Warner, Hawley and Blumenthal had cooked up with their new ACCESS Act [Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching Act] since it’s being pitched as pressuring big social media companies to open up their platforms to competitors.”