TechCrunch: Facebook rolls out more API restrictions and shutdowns

TechCrunch: Facebook rolls out more API restrictions and shutdowns. “Following the Cambridge Analytica data misuse scandal and the more recent discovery of a Facebook app that had been leaking data on 120 million users, Facebook is today announcing a number of API changes aimed at better protecting user information. The changes will impact multiple developer-facing APIs, including those used to create social experiences on the site, as well as those for media partners, and more.”

The Verge: Twitter is going to make third-party apps worse starting in August

The Verge: Twitter is going to make third-party apps worse starting in August. “Twitter has long had a strange disdain for third-party Twitter apps, but it’s allowed many of them to pass under the radar for the last several years. That’s starting to change this summer, when Twitter will revoke a key piece of access that developers currently have to the service, replacing it with a new access system that limits what they can do. The changes aren’t going to make third-party Twitter clients useless, but they are going to make the apps somewhat worse.” WHAT? Twitter treating third-party developers like crap? Say it ain’t so. Or, more accurately, say we’ve seen this movie before.

Ars Technica: Microsoft continues its quest to bring machine learning to every application

Ars Technica: Microsoft continues its quest to bring machine learning to every application. “We’ve been tracking Microsoft’s work to bring its machine learning platform to more developers and more applications over the last several years. What started as narrowly focused, specialized services have grown into a wider range of features that are more capable and more flexible, while also being more approachable to developers who aren’t experts in the field of machine learning. This year is no different. The core family of APIs covers the same ground as it has for a while—language recognition, translation, and image and video recognition—with Microsoft taking steps to make the services more capable and easier to integrate into applications.”

Eyerys: Researchers Created ‘Bayou’, An AI Capable In Writing Codes On Its Own

Eyerys: Researchers Created ‘Bayou’, An AI Capable In Writing Codes On Its Own. “It has been a goal for humans to create a computer software capable of creating other software on its own. And here, researchers have made than happen. Computer scientists at Rice University’s Intelligent Software Systems Laboratory has developed a deep learning AI that works like a search engine for codes. This AI is aimed to help programmers to write codes that contain Java application programming interfaces (APIs).”

Engadget: Twitter changes may bring major issues for third-party apps (updated)

Engadget: Twitter changes may bring major issues for third-party apps (updated). “If you use a third-party Twitter app like Tweetbot, Twitterrific, Talon or Tweetings, you might lose a couple of key features when Twitter replaces developer access to User and Site streams with a new Account Activity API this coming June. The folks who created the apps mentioned above have created a new website to explain that, as a result, push notifications will no longer work and timelines won’t refresh automatically.”

150 Translation APIs: Google Translate, Merriam-Webster and Microsoft Translator (Programmable Web)

Programmable Web: 150 Translation APIs: Google Translate, Merriam-Webster and Microsoft Translator. “Our API directory now includes 150 translation APIs. The newest is the Lingotek APITrack this API. The most popular, in terms of user click-throughs to the provider site, is the Google Translate API. Below you’ll find some more stats from the directory, including a list of the most popular translation APIs.” Wow!