WLOS: Blue Ridge National Heritage Area gets grants for craft trails project

WLOS: Blue Ridge National Heritage Area gets grants for craft trails project. “Craft artisans across the mountains are getting a big boost. The Blue Ridge National Heritage Area is getting $125,000 in grants to launch a system of driveable craft trails in 25 Western North Carolina counties.”

HV1: Preserving the Catskill folk songs of Grant Rogers

HV1: Preserving the Catskill folk songs of Grant Rogers. “Walton native Grant Rogers (1907-1979) didn’t consider himself a folksinger; in 1965 he told Folk-Legacy song collector Sandy Paton that folksingers were ‘fellers like Burl Ives or Pete Seeger,’ and that he was merely ‘a stonecutter that makes up songs.’ Ironic, considering that Rogers was exactly the sort of person whom Seeger would have honored with that description. He was a self-taught guitarist, fiddler, square dance caller, amateur historian and songwriter who made up tall tales about the Catskills and set them to music – among them ‘The Legend of Slide Mountain,’ which attributes the naming of that summit to an ornery, much-married homesteader who chased off her husbands with a shotgun whenever she tired of them, leading eventually to a human landslide when a sheriff’s posse abandoned an ill-considered effort to apprehend her.”

Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online

Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online. “Items on the site are sourced from a mix of local institutions and community members who lent digital copies of resources. Free and downloadable content on local black history is now available on the database compiled by East Tennessee PBS, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s School of Information Sciences, the Greeneville-Greene County History Museum and the George Clem Multicultural Alliance.”

RappNews: Hallberg set to make beautiful music at Sperryville dulcimer museum

RappNews: Hallberg set to make beautiful music at Sperryville dulcimer museum. “[John] Hallberg, 53, of Jenkins Hollow in Sperryville, had never played the dulcimer before then, but easily got hooked. He’s never taken lessons, but says the dulcimer is easy to learn to play and he’s learned to play by ear. Twenty years later he owns what he calls one of the world’s best collections of Appalachian dulcimers, numbering more than 60 instruments.” He is planning both an online and an offline museum.