Michigan State University: Great Lakes Water Life database documents biodiversity of Great Lakes native species

Michigan State University: Great Lakes Water Life database documents biodiversity of Great Lakes native species. “The biological diversity of the North American Great Lakes makes this set of interconnected freshwater ecosystems unique on a global scale. To document the wide variety of flora and fauna native to the Great Lakes, NOAA-GLERL has partnered with US EPA and the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network to launch the new Great Lakes Water Life database: a comprehensive, accessible inventory of aquatic species found throughout the region.”

Malay Mail: Penang to create database on fish farms to grow the industry

Malay Mail: Penang to create database on fish farms to grow the industry. “The Penang state government is collecting data on the billion-ringgit aquaculture industry in the state, Penang Chief Minister Chow Kon Yeow said. He said the state is now in the midst of streamlining statistics on the fish farms.”

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online

Philippine News Agency: Aquatic news index now available online. “A news index on aquatic and marine related news is now available online with the efforts of the library staff of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center-Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC-AQD). The Aquatic News Index (ANI), which is being maintained by the SEAFDEC-AQD library, contains aquatic science-related newspaper articles. In an interview Monday, Data Bank Senior Information Assistant Stephen B. Alayon said they will index all publications in newspapers, starting with Business Mirror, Business World, Malaya, Manila Bulletin, Manila Standard, Manila Times, Philippine Daily Inquirer and Philippine Star.”

University of Guelph: U of G Researchers Ensure Access to Nutritional Information for Farmed Fish and Aquatic Organisms

The University of Guelph has created a nutrition information database for the needs of farmed fish and other farmed aquatic organisms. “Although specific nutritional requirements for terrestrial animals like cattle, swine and poultry are well known by the producers who raise them, this is not the case for aquaculture. The sheer number of species in aquaculture means that there is a significant gap in the knowledge of nutritional needs of many farmed fish and aquatic organisms. For three years Prof. Dominique P. Bureau, Department of Animal Biosciences, led a team of researchers and a consortium of academic institutions to collect aquaculture nutritional information and knowledge into a central database. Over 500 aquatic species are farmed throughout globally.”