The Guardian: Historic England to offer virtual flights over ancient landscapes

The Guardian: Historic England to offer virtual flights over ancient landscapes. “The Aerial Archaeological Mapping Explorer contains thousands of sites identified on half a million aerial photographs covering more than half the country. Further archaeological remains have been identified using airborne laser scanning technology known as lidar (light, detection and ranging), which creates 3D images of the Earth’s surface.”

UK National Trust: Full personal collection of photographs taken by Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff at Sutton Hoo excavation digitised and online for the first time

UK National Trust: Full personal collection of photographs taken by Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff at Sutton Hoo excavation digitised and online for the first time. “Schoolmistresses and close friends, Mercie Lack and Barbara Wagstaff, were serious amateur photographers with an interest in archaeology. In the summer of 1939, they visited Sutton Hoo in Suffolk and went on to create an extraordinary photographic record of one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time.”

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant. “Once home to the ancestors of the Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, Yavapai, Havasupai, Hualapai, and several bands of Apache and Paiute, the Wupatki National Monument in Northern Arizona holds a precious record of migration, trade, and other practices dating back to the 11th century. The Center for Architectural Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design has received a $1.3 million grant from Getty to develop a conservation and management plan and professional training program for the site, which faces a variety of threats.”

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold. “Bryan Laughlin, director of Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, the St. Louis-based firm handling the auction, said the winning bidder declined to be named. A St. Louis family that’s owned the land since 1953 has mainly used it for hunting. The cave was the site of sacred rituals and burying of the dead. It also has more than 290 prehistoric glyphs, or hieroglyphic symbols used to represent sounds or meanings, ‘making it the largest collection of indigenous people’s polychrome paintings in Missouri,’ according to the auction website.”

Saving history: 3D laser scans preserve world heritage sites (Big Think)

Big Think: Saving history: 3D laser scans preserve world heritage sites. “Throughout history, countless artifacts have been caught in the crossfires of war, deliberately targeted by iconoclasts or swallowed up by the indifferent forces of nature and time. As a result, numerous non-profit groups and agencies — most notably, UNESCO — have sprung up to prevent the present from erasing the past. But while even the most well protected monument remains at risk of being physically destroyed, we now have a way to preserve them digitally.”

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites. “New archaeological research highlights major blind spots in Australia’s environmental management policies, placing submerged Indigenous heritage at risk. The Deep History of Sea Country (DHSC) project team have uncovered a new intertidal stone quarry and stone tool manufacturing site, as well as coastal rock art and engravings, during a land-and-sea archaeological survey off the Pilbara coastline in Western Australia.”

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation. “Archaeologists working on the HS2 rail link are looking for volunteers to help digitise the burial records of 57,639 Londoners who lived in the city in the 18th and 19th century. The information relates to St James’s Burial Ground near Euston station, where more than 31,000 burials were excavated as part of HS2’s archaeology work between 2018 and 2019.”

Phys .org: A database of 3,000 lead isotope analyses in geological and archaeological samples from the Iberian Peninsula

Phys .org: A database of 3,000 lead isotope analyses in geological and archaeological samples from the Iberian Peninsula. “The use of lead isotopic data has been shown to be a useful tool in the investigation of raw materials in geological site exploration and metal provenance studies in archaeology. Users of this type of information have often requested complete datasets that include not only numerical values of isotope ratios, but also mineralogical and geological information about the samples analyzed, to enable the data to be compared.”

Stylist: Archaeology is trending on TikTok – here’s how to make it your new hobby

Stylist: Archaeology is trending on TikTok – here’s how to make it your new hobby . “From verified accounts that share videos about new finds and favourite artefacts, to videos of people metal detecting and a plethora of hilarious archaeology-themed memes, it seems plenty of students, academics and eager hobbyists are finding that #archaeologytiktok is a great space to share their enthusiasm for digging up old stuff and working out what it can tell us about the history of humankind.” An interesting, informative article saddled with an absolutely wretched headline.

Michigan State University: Bringing an archaeology project into the digital age

Michigan State University: Bringing an archaeology project into the digital age. “The design and tone of the new website combines classic and contemporary elements, reflecting the omnipresent application of digital technologies in modern-day archaeology. Visitors to the website will see a carefully curated blend of black-and-white and color photographs taken throughout the dig’s collaborative history.” The dig referenced is the MSU Excavations at Isthmia, Greece. Research at the site became an ongoing thing in the early 1950s.

New York Times: Amateur Fossil Hunters Make Rare Find in U.K. Using Google Earth

New York Times: Amateur Fossil Hunters Make Rare Find in U.K. Using Google Earth. “The Hollingworths met in 2016 at a local science festival under the skeleton of a Gorgosaurus, perhaps foreshadowing the couple’s big discovery. While many people turned to sourdough and banana bread recipes to keep occupied through three pandemic lockdowns in England, the couple scoured Google Earth to pinpoint the site of their next excavation.”

The Conversation: AI spots shipwrecks from the ocean surface – and even from the air

The Conversation: AI spots shipwrecks from the ocean surface – and even from the air. “In collaboration with the United States Navy’s Underwater Archaeology Branch, I taught a computer how to recognize shipwrecks on the ocean floor from scans taken by aircraft and ships on the surface. The computer model we created is 92% accurate in finding known shipwrecks. The project focused on the coasts of the mainland U.S. and Puerto Rico. It is now ready to be used to find unknown or unmapped shipwrecks.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting. “Lighting sources could indeed hold vital clues to the different ways prehistoric peoples used caves, according to a new paper by a team of Spanish scientists, published in the journal PLOS ONE. They conducted in situ experiments with three different kinds of Paleolithic lighting sources in the hopes of shedding some light (pun intended) on what those various illumination methods might tell us about the emergence of ‘human symbolic and artistic behavior’ in the form of cave art.”

University of Southern Queensland: Unexplored Aboriginal rock art to share secrets of the past

University of Southern Queensland: Unexplored Aboriginal rock art to share secrets of the past. “It’s one of the richest bodies of rock art in the world but parts of the Laura Sandstone Basin in Queensland’s Cape York Peninsula have been virtually unexplored by archaeologists – until now. As one of 11 specialists from around Australia, University of Southern Queensland Professor of Archaeology/Anthropology Bryce Barker is a Chief Investigator on a research project, that promises to have profound findings about Australia’s past through the recording of unique rock art.”