Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt. “When British Egyptologist Flinders Petrie came to Egypt in 1883 he explored several archaeological sites and revealed some of the country’s ancient history. According to Egyptian law at the time, archaeological dig sponsors had full rights to half of finds, while Egypt retained the other half. Half a century after Petrie’s death, the British Museum in London started cataloguing some of the artefacts he unearthed in Egypt, especially those in possession of the 60 museums involved in sponsoring Petrie’s excavation missions. The exciting news is that early this month they began preparing to catalogue them in an online searchable database format.”

Isle of Man Today: Website is a one-stop shop for information about archaeology and old buildings

Isle of Man Today: Website is a one-stop shop for information about archaeology and old buildings . “Historic Environment Records are information services that provide access to resources relating to the archaeology and old buildings of a defined geographic area. They contain details on archaeological sites and finds, historic buildings and historic landscapes and are frequently updated. Information on the island’s historic places, archaeological sites, landscapes and historic buildings can be found on the site.”

Hyperallergic: Listen to the Sounds of an 18,000-year-old Conch

Hyperallergic: Listen to the Sounds of an 18,000-year-old Conch. “Music elites better table your ukuleles and unplug your theremins; science is bringing the noise with the newest in niche musical instruments. Or, more accurately, one of the oldest. A massive conch shell, unearthed by archaeologists in 1931 amid the remains of the Upper Paleolithic Marsoulas cave society, has been recently determined to be a musical instrument.”

San Antonio Report: Archaeologists have recorded 233 ancient art sites along Texas’ border with Mexico. Now they want to discover the meanings behind the murals

San Antonio Report: Archaeologists have recorded 233 ancient art sites along Texas’ border with Mexico. Now they want to discover the meanings behind the murals. “Shumla, a Comstock-based nonprofit focused on locating, studying and preserving the rock art of the lower Pecos River region, has created a virtual library to help researchers interpret the ancient art, much of it located in rough, inaccessible terrain or on private ranchlands. Launched in 2017, the Alexandria Project is a detailed digital archive of 233 rock art sites in the limestone canyonlands carved by the Pecos and Devils rivers and the Rio Grande.”

Getty: Online Exhibition Explores Palmyra in English and Arabic

Getty: Online Exhibition Explores Palmyra in English and Arabic. “For centuries the ruins of the ancient city of Palmyra have captured the imagination–testaments to the legacy of the prosperous multicultural center of trade that once dominated the region. Return to Palmyra, a new website presented in English and Arabic, invites audiences to explore the rich history of the city, including an exhibition of rare 18th-century etchings and 19th-century photographs of the site, new scholarship, and a moving interview with Waleed Khaled al-As’ad about the modern-day experience of living and working among the ruins of this storied locale.”

EurekAlert: Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test

EurekAlert: Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test. “A ruler and scale can tell archaeologists the size and weight of a fragment of pottery – but identifying its precise color can depend on individual perception. So, when a handheld color-matching gadget came on the market, scientists hoped it offered a consistent way of determining color, free of human bias. But a new study by archaeologists at the Florida Museum of Natural History found that the tool, known as the X-Rite Capsure, often misread colors readily distinguished by the human eye.”

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History: Mongolian Archaeological Project Receives 2 Million Euro Arcadia Grant

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History: Mongolian Archaeological Project Receives 2 Million Euro Arcadia Grant. “Archaeological sites in Mongolia face a range of threats, including climate change and looting. With funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is launching the Mongolian Archaeological Project: Surveying the Steppes (MAPSS). Investigators in Mongolia and Germany will use satellite imagery and existing archival material to create a unified, open access database of Mongolian archaeology.”

Stanford Libraries: Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks

Stanford Libraries: Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks . “A current effort is underway to archive archaeological research documentation from Çatalhöyük — a 9000 year old neolithic settlement in the central plains of Turkey widely recognized as one of the most important archaeological sites in the world — in the Stanford Digital Repository. We have just achieved our first major milestone and released the image collection of about 144,000 images on Searchworks.”

The Art Newspaper: From mummies to mosques—new Google Arts & Culture initiative brings Egypt’s archaeological treasures to the masses

The Art Newspaper: From mummies to mosques—new Google Arts & Culture initiative brings Egypt’s archaeological treasures to the masses. “‘From Pharaonic tombs, to Mamluk mosques, and from Coptic monasteries to Roman villas,’ you can now take online tours of Egypt’s most important archaeological sites. The Google Arts & Culture organisation has teamed up to create the digital platform Preserving Egypt’s Layered History with archaeologists at the American Research Centre in Cairo, revealing ‘stories of the restoration of diverse locations around Egypt’.”

New York Times: Lockdown Gardening in Britain Leads to Archaeological Discoveries

New York Times: Lockdown Gardening in Britain Leads to Archaeological Discoveries. ” Gardeners in Hampshire, a county in southeast England, were weeding their yard in April when they found 63 gold coins and one silver coin from King Henry VIII’s reign in the 16th century, with four of the coins inscribed with the initials of the king’s wives Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour. The archaeological find was one of more than 47,000 in England and Wales that were reported this year, amid an increase in backyard gardening during coronavirus lockdowns, the British Museum said on Wednesday.”