Sonoma News: Sonoma history group launches online architectural database

Sonoma News: Sonoma history group launches online architectural database. “The original information was gathered in 1978 by a group of league volunteers, lead by Johanna Patri, who is still an active member. At that time the volunteers spent 14 months surveying the Valley with clipboards and cameras, gathering as much architectural information as they could about any house believed to be more than 50 years old. Smaller surveys were completed in 1998 and 2012, updating existing data and adding more homes for a total of approximately 700 properties.”

Wirral Globe: Lottery boost for Port Sunlight ‘Drawn Together’ online archive

Wirral Globe: Lottery boost for Port Sunlight ‘Drawn Together’ online archive. “The documents, including more than 4,000 original plans and detail drawings, illustrate founder William Lever’s vision for Port Sunlight, an industrial model village for his workers and the artistic and physical development, expansion and evolution of the village over a span of 70 years.”

Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens

New-to-me, from Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens. “In Bayside, Queens, the American Martyrs Roman-Catholic church sits proudly on a street corner, standing in high relief compared to the single-family homes nearby. It’s circular and covered in yellow bricks, with a folded-plate copper roof that’s aged into a mossy shade of green…. It’s a fine building designed by John O’Malley, one of the most prolific ecclesiastical architects in Brooklyn and Queens. You won’t find the church in most history books about modern architecture, but it is included in Queens Modern, a digital archive composed of adaptations of the movement in New York City’s largest borough, which was updated at the end of December to include deeper dives into over a dozen firms active during the mid-20th-century.” There appears to be some concern in the comments that not everything included is “real” modernist. I don’t know enough about architecture to judge.

WBIW: Indiana Architectural Foundation Announces 50 Significant Buildings and Sites as Part of New Database Celebrating Design in Indiana

WBIW: Indiana Architectural Foundation Announces 50 Significant Buildings and Sites as Part of New Database Celebrating Design in Indiana. “Indiana has a rich architectural history, and the Indiana Architectural Foundation wants people to know about it and experience it. The Foundation today is announcing a statewide database that features some of the state’s most significant architecture. It’s the first database of its kind in the state, where visitors can learn more about the architecture of buildings old and new and learn how Indiana’s economy and culture have been shaped through design.” There are plans to add more buildings over time.

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection. “Beijing launched a new website on Dec. 17 to provide historical, cultural and geographical information of the old sites and relics in the capital. By visiting…, people can learn about Beijing at different times in history, appreciate the intangible cultural heritages, and access the memories of the city’s well-known people.” The site is in Chinese. On a scale of 1-10 for Google Translate-ability, with 10 being best, I’d rate it a 6. It got hung up on a couple menu pages and I had to just take a random guess.

Ars Technica: Archaeologists reconstruct pre-Columbian temple with 3D-printed blocks

Ars Technica: Archaeologists reconstruct pre-Columbian temple with 3D-printed blocks. “The unfinished temple in a southern valley of the Lake Titicaca Basin in modern-day Bolivia has been a mystery for at least 500 years. Now known as the Pumapunku—’Door of the Jaguar’ in the Quechua language—the complex stone structure is part of a sprawling complex of pyramids, plazas, and platforms built by a pre-Columbian culture we now call the Tiwanaku. Construction began around 500 CE and proceeded off and on, in phases, over the next few centuries until the Tiwanaku left the site around 900 or 1000 CE.”

6sqft: New Historic Districts Council website lists every landmark in NYC

6sqft: New Historic Districts Council website lists every landmark in NYC. “Preservationists, advocates, history buffs and anyone interested in finding out about the history of New York City’s neighborhoods and landmarks has an exciting new resource at their fingertips. The Historic Districts Council (HDC) has launched a new website that offers a complete list of every historic district, individual landmark, interior landmark and scenic landmark in New York City.”