A Journal Of The Plague Year: An Archive Of COVID19 (Omeka)

A new Omeka collection whose title will do wonderful things for your blood pressure: A Journal Of The Plague Year: An Archive Of COVID19. From the about page: “Join us in creating this repository of our uncertain moment. We are acting not just as historians, but as chroniclers, recorders, memoirists, image collectors. Contribute your experience and impressions of how CoVid19 has affected our lives, from the mundane to the extraordinary, including the ways things haven’t changed at all. Contribute text, images, video, tweets, texts, Facebook posts, Instagram or Snapchat memes, and screenshots of the news and emails–anything that speaks to paradoxes of the moment. Imagine, as we are, what future historian might need to write about and understand this historical moment.”

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze. “Ephemera, ‘relating to the day’, published to be of transitory use and then thrown away — such material creates a challenge for the librarian or archivist. How to collect and preserve Ephemera for future researchers? Thankfully, the Library is rising to the challenge, now not only in analogue formats but in the digital environment.”

Christian Science Monitor: The national archives built from a crumpled napkin

Christian Science Monitor: The national archives built from a crumpled napkin. “It was 1991, and in the bombed-out ruins of Somaliland’s newly proclaimed capital city, a woman selling camel milk tea and laxoox, spongy Somali pancakes, handed a customer a piece of paper off the ground so that he could wipe the dirt off his hands. But as Jama Musse Jama prepared to crinkle the paper in his hands, his eyes snagged on the text. These were the trial records from a famous court case a decade earlier that had sent hundreds of student activists to prison.”

Photos: Inside The Last Days Of The ARChive Of Contemporary Music In Tribeca (Gothamist)

Gothamist: Photos: Inside The Last Days Of The ARChive Of Contemporary Music In Tribeca. “How many albums can you think of that feature a space helmet on the cover? There’s Gnarls Barkley’s St. Elsewhere, Moby’s 18, Parliament’s Mothership Connection, and Tom Petty’s Highway Companion. There are soundtracks for movies like Moonraker, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and The Day The Earth Stood Still. What about that Star Wars disco album? Does Daft Punk count? There are at least 360 of them according to archivist Bob George, and he should know: he is the founder and director of The ARChive Of Contemporary Music (ARC), a nonprofit archive, music library and research center that has become home to one of the world’s largest collections of popular music in all its physical forms.”

A journey into openness: an interview with Connecticut Digital Archive’s Mike Kemezis (Medium)

Medium: A journey into openness: an interview with Connecticut Digital Archive’s Mike Kemezis. “Michael Kemezis is the Repository Manager at the Homer Babbidge Library at the University of Connecticut. He is in charge of the Connecticut Digital Archive (CTDA) and he has been a key figure in CTDA’s adoption of Creative Commons and Rights Statements tools. In this interview, we explore the process that the CTDA followed to implement Rights Statements and Creative Commons tools, and gain insight on what still needs to be done to empower the sector.”

Commentary: Fire-ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral can be ‘saved’ another way: Digitally (Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Tribune: Commentary: Fire-ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral can be ‘saved’ another way: Digitally . “New reporting about last spring’s devastating fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris — and, specifically, how the world-renowned structure is still at risk of collapse — offers yet another reminder of the fragility of humankind’s greatest creations and the stark reality that centuries of culture and history can be wiped out in minutes.”