Brass, Marble, Glass, Laminate, and Steel: Results from Tests of Coronavirus on Five Common Museum and Library Building Materials (Institute of Museum and Library Services)

The Institute of Museum and Library Services: Brass, Marble, Glass, Laminate, and Steel: Results from Tests of Coronavirus on Five Common Museum and Library Building Materials. “The REALM project has released results from the sixth round of tests conducted in a Battelle laboratory that determined how long SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can remain active on five materials commonly used in furnishings, exhibits, and equipment found in museums, libraries, and archives. The tests examined architectural glass, marble, countertop laminate, brass, and powder-coated steel. Samples of each material were inoculated with active virus, allowed to dry, and then placed in an environmentally controlled chamber with no outside light or air.”

RNZ: Ngā Taonga restructures to disestablish 29 roles

RNZ: Ngā Taonga restructures to disestablish 29 roles. “A major restructure at the national film and sound archive is being met with fears that access to New Zealand’s past will be irreversibly lost. Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision is set to disestablish 29 roles next month, replacing them with as many new roles that aim to improve public access to the historic visual and radio content. But those who spent years working in the archive’s collection say that won’t be the case.”

For music archivists, a contemporary dilemma: Should racist songs from our past be heard today? (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: For music archivists, a contemporary dilemma: Should racist songs from our past be heard today? . “It’s a journey that American pop culture creators and curators have repeatedly taken as the Black Lives Matter movement has brought renewed attention to white privilege and called out once-common racists tropes. Much of the focus has been on TV episodes featuring blackface. Creators of ’30 Rock,’ ‘The Golden Girls,’ ‘Saturday Night Live’ and ‘The Office’ have all removed from circulation offensive episodes. This year thousands of ice cream trucks that for decades churned out ‘Turkey in the Straw’ have been reprogrammed to delete a work whose roots stretch to an 1830s-era song called ‘Zip Coon.'”

Profile: Petersen Museum Archivist Laura Fisher Leads Effort to Preserve Automotive History (Automobile Magazine)

Automobile Magazine: Profile: Petersen Museum Archivist Laura Fisher Leads Effort to Preserve Automotive History. “Leading the efforts to preserve automotive history at the Petersen Publishing Archive is Petersen Automotive Museum archivist Laura Fisher, 30, who took us on a tour. After walking the aisles, rummaging through boxes, and a quick stroll in the Vault, we sat down to chat.”

Lift Every Voice 2020: Defining the Black Reconstruction Archive (Emory University Event)

Emory University Event: Lift Every Voice 2020: Defining the Black Reconstruction Archive. “‘Defining the Black Reconstruction Archive’ is the first of three panels that will explore the history and significance of Reconstruction. Panelists will highlight the manner in which African American archives and Black print culture illuminate the African American experience and shape the stories that we tell. They will discuss such topics as the use of archival collections that shaped their research, and African American patriotism and activism.” I’m 99% sure this is both free and virtual.

New York Times: Library of Congress Acquires Archives of the National Women’s Party

New York Times: Library of Congress Acquires Archives of the National Women’s Party. “The donation unites more than 300,000 documents, photographs, letters, broadsides, scrapbooks and other items relating to the party with another 200,000 items previously acquired by the library. The new materials relate to all stages of the party’s history, from its founders’ earlier involvement in feminist activism to the fight over the 19th Amendment to its decades of advocacy for the Equal Rights Amendment.”

The Hustle: The company that wants to preserve our data for 500+ years

The Hustle: The company that wants to preserve our data for 500+ years . “Deep in the Norweigan arctic, on the ice-encrusted island of Spitsbergen, life stands still. The surrounding lands of the Svalbard archipelago are sparse and desolate. It is a place where there is a 1:10 polar bear to human ratio, where the sun doesn’t rise for 4 months per year, and the northern lights dance across the sky. But on the side of a mountain in Spitsbergen, there’s an abandoned coal mine. And inside — some 250 meters below the Earth’s surface — you’ll find a steel vault that contains an archive of film encoded with hundreds of thousands of open-source projects from around the world.”

UConn Today: Archival Documents, Like Magic, Thanks to UConn Researchers’ New App

UConn Today: Archival Documents, Like Magic, Thanks to UConn Researchers’ New App. “…Sourcery gives researchers convenient, remote access to special collections that can’t otherwise be found online. Users just plug in citation information for the desired source material into the app, which can connect researchers to any institution in Sourcery’s service area. A researcher or graduate student in the local area is paid a fee to make a digital version following relevant copyrights, regulations, or policies, and within a matter of hours or days, the documents appear in the user’s inbox. No planes, no trains, no favors. Sourcery first launched in New York City, Boston, and Storrs. Now they are expanding coverage to include New Haven, Connecticut and Washington, D.C., where many of the world’s most in-demand special collections are located.”

Getty Iris: First Release of Getty’s New Research Collections Viewer Offers Digital Access to Vast Archives

Getty Iris: First Release of Getty’s New Research Collections Viewer Offers Digital Access to Vast Archives. “Now online in its initial release, the Research Collections Viewer offers a visual way to browse and search Getty’s archival collections. The Viewer aims to make it easier to see what we have in our research collections—rare primary source material such as artists’ papers, prints, and photographs—as well as contextual information such as related works by the same artist.”

Emory University: Emory acquires archive of Black Panther Party activist Kathleen Cleaver

Emory University: Emory acquires archive of Black Panther Party activist Kathleen Cleaver. “Emory University has acquired the personal papers of Black Panther Party member, activist, and retired Emory Law faculty member Kathleen Cleaver. The papers, which will reside at Emory’s Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, span Cleaver’s career and life as an activist, particularly as a member of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and include personal and professional correspondence, books and photographs, as well as audiovisual and born-digital material.”

Harvard Gazette: Challenge of archiving the #MeToo movement

Harvard Gazette: Challenge of archiving the #MeToo movement. “For decades, Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library has been the nation’s leading repository for a range of primary-source materials documenting the lives and legacies of women in America. Its collections are crammed with letters and posters, journals and photographs — the physical records of an individual, a family, a social action, a political campaign. Today, newer collections often arrive with hard disks and thumb drives; ‘papers’ now include emails. But until recently, social media had not figured largely. Then came a cultural moment that shook the nation and helped transform the way the library collects and curates material in a communications age when hashtags can muster millions and tweets are commentary, conversation, and official declaration.”

Radio Boise: Radio Free America On-Demand Archiver Shut Down

Radio Boise: Radio Free America On-Demand Archiver Shut Down. “In unexpected news, Radio Free America has suspended operations indefinitely as of Saturday, August 15, 2020. We are searching for an alternative show audio archiving service – which will take time – but we’ll keep you posted as we find a new solution.”

MyNorthwest: After numerous ‘red flags,’ AG Ferguson sues federal agencies over Seattle National Archives facility

MyNorthwest: After numerous ‘red flags,’ AG Ferguson sues federal agencies over Seattle National Archives facility. “When the federal government decided, without any public process, to close and sell the Seattle facility of the National Archives and Records Administration earlier this year, a lot of people were taken by surprise. One of those blindsided by the decision was Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson…. On Monday, Ferguson’s office filed a lawsuit against three of the four federal agencies involved in the secret decision to close and sell the federal facility, which has been a fixture in Seattle’s Sand Point neighborhood since the early 1960s.”

British Film Archive: Brazil’s film archive is facing wipeout

British Film Archive: Brazil’s film archive is facing wipeout. “Indifference and hostility from successive governments have left the Cinemateca Brasileira, one of Latin America’s great film institutions, close to collapse. Director Walter Salles and other Brazilian film industry figures explain how this came about and what’s at stake.”

“We shouldn’t be curating people’s souls:” Denver museum repatriates sacred carvings to Kenyan tribes (Denver Post)

Denver Post: “We shouldn’t be curating people’s souls:” Denver museum repatriates sacred carvings to Kenyan tribes. “At the Denver museum, the discovery of 30 wooden statues sent curators on a quest to return the items said to hold the souls of ancestors. For the Mijikenda people in Kenya and northern Tanzania, the carvings — long rectangular, intricately designed bodies and round heads — both memorialize prominent members of the society who died and embody their spirits.”