The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives

The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives. “More than 70 years after they were murdered at Auschwitz, six unknown Holocaust victims will be laid to rest after it was revealed that their remains have lain for decades in the Imperial War Museum archives. Unbeknown to Jewish leaders, the ashes and bone fragments, believed to belong to five adults and a child, have been in storage for more than 20 years since they were bequeathed in the late 1990s by a Holocaust survivor who took them during a visit to the Nazi death camp.” Sometimes I have to stop, take out my handkerchief, and cry for a few minutes.

CLIR: CLIR Announces 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Awards

CLIR: CLIR Announces 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives Awards. “The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) today announced the award of over $3.8 million to fund 17 projects for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. More than 40 institutions located in 17 states and one US territory will be involved in the projects covering subjects ranging from endangered languages and displaced peoples to health issues, architecture, and fisheries.”

Rising Voices: The opportunities and challenges in managing indigenous digital archives

Rising Voices: The opportunities and challenges in managing indigenous digital archives. “Digital resources provide an opportunity for improved preservation and access, but also new challenges when it comes to who has access to this information, how the materials are categorized, used, and how to best safeguard indigenous rights associated with their content (including rights of privacy and dissemination). This is the challenge facing one Philadelphia-based institution in the United States, the American Philosophical Society (APS). With more than 1,700 unique manuscripts, photographs, and audio recordings related to over 650 different indigenous cultures of the Americas in its possession, the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR), founded in 2014 within the APS Library, has been looking for ways to take full advantage of technology to ensure that the 60+ indigenous communities and nations in North America reconnect with collections in innovative and collaborative ways. APS calls this approach Digital Knowledge Sharing.”

Archives And Modern Mythology: The Use Of Archival Records In Comic Books (Peel Archives Blog)

Peel Archives Blog: Archives And Modern Mythology: The Use Of Archival Records In Comic Books. “Previously within our Archives in Popular Culture posts, we have explored how archives and/or records have been used to advance the plot in several different movies. For this popular culture post, I would like to change gears and move on to explore how selected comic book writers and artists have chosen to include and depict records in some of their stories and artwork.”

Genealogy’s Star: How do we find records in an archive?

Genealogy’s Star: How do we find records in an archive?. “Archives differ from your local public library or even a large university library in certain important ways. Depending on your experience when you go to a library, you might expect to see books and other resources on shelves and you might decided to browse around and look for something intersting. If you go to an archive, and are prepared to do research, you might find an office with few evident resources visible and be lost. There is a real need before going to an archive to find out as much as you can about the facility.” Nice overview.

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History. “If you were to build your own time capsule, what would you want people—or alien beings—a million years from now to know about us? That we were loving, or warmongering, or dopes strung out on memes and viral videos? That we flew to the moon and made great art, ate Cinnabons (that we measured at 880 astonishing calories), and committed atrocities? How could you begin to represent these times, as lived by nearly 8 billion people? And what would give you, of all people, the right to tell the story? After these questions would come another wave of more logistical ones. Assuming the capsule was found, how would it be translated into the language of the future, whatever that language might be? And what materials could be employed that might last that long? And how could you lead a future race of beings to the capsule itself, assuming our planet might be buried under ice or oceans of red sand by then?”

The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation (DW)

DW: The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation. “Some 120 million visitors take advantage of the educational and cultural offerings of German libraries each year. That’s one reason why, in September, the German Council for Cultural Education published a study on the digitization of library services. One of the results: Digitization has a very positive effect on both the image, and range of services, of libraries.”