“We shouldn’t be curating people’s souls:” Denver museum repatriates sacred carvings to Kenyan tribes (Denver Post)

Denver Post: “We shouldn’t be curating people’s souls:” Denver museum repatriates sacred carvings to Kenyan tribes. “At the Denver museum, the discovery of 30 wooden statues sent curators on a quest to return the items said to hold the souls of ancestors. For the Mijikenda people in Kenya and northern Tanzania, the carvings — long rectangular, intricately designed bodies and round heads — both memorialize prominent members of the society who died and embody their spirits.”

MyNorthwest: Fate of Seattle National Archives facility still in limbo

MyNorthwest: Fate of Seattle National Archives facility still in limbo. “The archives serve the Pacific Alaska Region and are located on Sand Point Way near Magnuson Park. Sitting on 10 acres along the Burke-Gilman Trail, the location is prime real estate in one of the city’s nicest neighborhoods. The facility itself is housed in a World War II-era warehouse, which was converted in the early 1960s and which is operated by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). The Seattle office, and most NARA facilities, have been closed to the public since March 23 because of COVID-19. In spite of the pandemic, multiple processes appear to still be underway to try and prevent the archival materials, if not the actual NARA facility itself, from leaving Washington.”

Times Higher Education: Creating and supporting digital archives to improve access and research

Times Higher Education: Creating and supporting digital archives to improve access and research. “Now more than ever, there is a demand for universities to make available content in digital form from archives and collections that include books, primary sources and multimedia material. However, the cost of this type of digital transformation is considerable. To make the job easier, Jisc, the UK education and research technology solutions not-for-profit, is bringing together libraries, publishers and academic institutions to make digital collections more accessible.”

Reuters: Hong Kong Tiananmen museum turns to digitalisation after new law

Reuters: Hong Kong Tiananmen museum turns to digitalisation after new law. “A Hong Kong museum chronicling the crackdown by Chinese troops on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square is raising funds to digitalise its collection as concerns over a new national security law create uncertainty over its future.”

Scoop New Zealand: Canterbury Earthquake Resources Find A Permanent Home

Scoop New Zealand: Canterbury Earthquake Resources Find A Permanent Home. “Lessons learned from the Canterbury earthquakes will be shared widely and preserved for the future when a collection of reports and information moves to a new digital home. The Government’s Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Learning and Legacy Programme – which collected over 200 online items – is being transferred to the University of Canterbury’s CEISMIC – Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive.”

WashU Expert: How to document the protests (Washington University in St. Louis)

Washington University in St. Louis: WashU Expert: How to document the protests. “Americans across the nation are documenting today’s protests through photography and video, often posting their content on Instagram, Twitter and other social media feeds. But is that the safest way to preserve these historic images? No, said Miranda Rectenwald, curator of local history at University Libraries at Washington University in St. Louis. She has created a list of resources from Documenting the Now, the Blacktivists and more, to help protest participants preserve their content for the long term.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Defining Oral History – Part II

State Archives of North Carolina: Defining Oral History – Part II. “In addition to the intimate relationship between narrator and interviewer, one of the most important aspects of oral history that sets it apart from other story-gathering and story-sharing tools is that it is intended to live on and it is the responsibility of an Archives (or other repository) to have a plan for that.”

Wanted dead or archive: how film-makers repurpose old footage (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Wanted dead or archive: how film-makers repurpose old footage. “A child sits on a rock ledge buckling his shoe. The camera zooms towards a mysterious dark shape behind him as the boy scampers towards us in fright. A black bear has just lumbered into view. We may never know how this scene played out, who shot it, or why. These grainy images unfurl from a dusty film canister found in a charity shop. Around the world, limitless hours of undiscovered footage like this lie waiting for a new audience; from forgotten newsreels to public information films, astral visions shot by astronauts to ‘found footage’ home movies. Welcome to the rich world of archive film-making.”

Archinect: Paul Revere Williams archive acquired by USC School of Architecture and Getty Research Institute

Archinect: Paul Revere Williams archive acquired by USC School of Architecture and Getty Research Institute. “The architectural archives of prolific 20th century architect Paul Revere Williams, long thought to have been lost to fire during the 1992 Los Angeles Uprising, have been jointly acquired by the University of Southern California School of Architecture and the Getty Research Institute (GRI). Rather than being lost, however, according to an announcement published by the Getty Research Institute, the archive had been ‘meticulously cared for by Karen Elyse Hudson, Williams’ granddaughter, who has published extensively on his work.'”

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Digital Archives of Armenian National Library Restored Online

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Digital Archives of Armenian National Library Restored Online. “According to the acting director of the National Library of Armenia, Hrachya Saribekyan, online access to digitized materials of the library has been restored after almost three weeks. In a June 3 press conference, he reiterated that the digitized files had been preserved in hard drives which were undamaged despite the fire in the server section of the library.” You can learn more about the Armenian National Library fire here.

The Guardian: National archives’ 90-day delay to declassify palace letters ‘extremely disappointing’

The Guardian: National archives’ 90-day delay to declassify palace letters ‘extremely disappointing’. “The historian Jenny Hocking says she is ‘extremely disappointed’ that the National Archives of Australia has asserted it has 90 business days to declassify the palace letters prior to release, saying it may misunderstand the orders of the high court. The archives on Tuesday issued a statement saying it was working to prepare the letters – correspondence between the Queen, her private secretary, and the governor general, John Kerr, in the lead up to the former prime minister Gough Whitlam’s 1975 dismissal – for release following a momentous high court ruling last week.”

Columbia Academic Commons: Visualizing Archival Collections for Fun and (Non)Profit Using Google Data Studio

Columbia Academic Commons: Visualizing Archival Collections for Fun and (Non)Profit Using Google Data Studio. “Presentation delivered at Code4Lib 2020, Pittsburgh, 11 March 2020. The presentation used archival collections data from Columbia University’s distinctive collections to demonstrate the effectiveness of Google Data Studio combined with other data manipulation tools to visualize collections data in meaningful ways. The presentation discussed some of the pros and cons of this approach and suggested institutional scenarios for which it could be a good fit.”

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise. “Delay would appear to be the default position for matters relating to government records and archives. It is now seven years since the Law Reform Commission, at the request of the administration, established a subcommittee to consider the need for legislation for the management of government records and archives, and the public is still waiting for the subcommittee’s final report and recommendations.”

A Journal Of The Plague Year: An Archive Of COVID19 (Omeka)

A new Omeka collection whose title will do wonderful things for your blood pressure: A Journal Of The Plague Year: An Archive Of COVID19. From the about page: “Join us in creating this repository of our uncertain moment. We are acting not just as historians, but as chroniclers, recorders, memoirists, image collectors. Contribute your experience and impressions of how CoVid19 has affected our lives, from the mundane to the extraordinary, including the ways things haven’t changed at all. Contribute text, images, video, tweets, texts, Facebook posts, Instagram or Snapchat memes, and screenshots of the news and emails–anything that speaks to paradoxes of the moment. Imagine, as we are, what future historian might need to write about and understand this historical moment.”