GRAMMY Museum: GRAMMY Museum® Grant Program Awards $200,000 For Music Research And Sound Preservation

GRAMMY Museum: GRAMMY Museum® Grant Program Awards $200,000 For Music Research And Sound Preservation. “The GRAMMY Museum® Grant Program announced today that $200,000 in grants will be awarded to 15 recipients in the United States to help facilitate a range of research on a variety of subjects, as well as support a number of archiving and preservation programs…. Preservation projects include the archiving of uncirculated John Hartford jam tapes, 960 audio reels of Cajun and zydeco artists, and 221 rare interview recordings with African-American actors, performers, composers, musicians, and scholars, among many other preservation projects.”

Philadelphia Gay News: Digital LGBTQ archive launches, with corporate help

Philadelphia Gay News: Digital LGBTQ archive launches, with corporate help. “The project’s ultimate goal is the digital centralization of LGBTQ materials currently housed in dozens of archives, libraries and museums across the country. Items to be digitized run the gamut of historical artifacts, from photographs, letters and video clips to posters, visual art and historical records. Big-hitting acquisitions include memorabilia from the Stonewall Riots, whose 50th anniversary was marked by numerous events late last month.” The archive is set to launch next year.

The Conversation: Your internet data is rotting

The Conversation: Your internet data is rotting. “Acid-free paper can last 500 years; stone inscriptions even longer. But magnetic media like hard drives have a much shorter life, lasting only three to five years. They also need to be copied and verified on a very short life cycle to avoid data degradation at observed failure rates between 3% and 8% annually. Then there is also a problem of software preservation: How can people today or in the future interpret those WordPerfect or WordStar files from the 1980s, when the original software companies have stopped supporting them or gone out of business?”

Myanmar Times: Open History project

Myanmar Times: Open History project. “In Myanmar, one man is on the path to build a library of many millions of words by collecting as much archival, antiqued and stored treasure as possible to save it for posterity. The collection also includes videos and artworks. He is Ko Aung Soe Min of Pansodan gallery. With the vast materials already collected, Ko Aung Soe Min has put on shows in Yangon and Magway, among other places, for the benefit of the public. He named this show, the ‘Open History Project’.”

Archive the Evidence: Help Wayback Machine and MuckRock preserve the links from the redacted Mueller Report (Muckrock)

Muckrock: Archive the Evidence: Help Wayback Machine and MuckRock preserve the links from the redacted Mueller Report. “Help the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine and MuckRock build up an annotated version of the redacted Mueller Report, including URLs to all the publicly referenced government documents, news accounts, and other reference materials. We’re partnering with Archive.org to go through all submitted URLs to capture historical copies of them, and we’ll then put together an annotated version that includes the title of the material reference, links to the live material, and links to the Wayback Machine‘s archival copies of the same material, in case anything is removed or altered.”

BBC News: An alternative way to capture childhood on your phone

BBC News: An alternative way to capture childhood on your phone. “One thing I’ve found from hours spent filming and recording audio at work as a BBC News video features journalist is that the most poignant moments are very difficult to capture. You are lucky to have the mechanical equipment on and recording during that telling event that unfolded so quickly around you. But by using that capturing device that is always on but invisible, known as our memory, any event, any candid, revelatory moment that unfolded suddenly out of the mundane, can be recorded and cherished.”

The Narwhal: Librarian rushes to archive Alberta’s climate change data before change in government

The Narwhal: Librarian rushes to archive Alberta’s climate change data before change in government. “University of Alberta librarian Katie Cuyler says industry experts and academics have requested she begin ‘guerrilla archiving’ critical information they fear could disappear under a new United Conservative government.”