Survey: Only One-Third of Agencies Are Sending NARA Electronic Records (NextGov)

NextGov: Survey: Only One-Third of Agencies Are Sending NARA Electronic Records. “Many federal agencies could be at risk of not meeting National Archives and Records Administration’s mandate to manage (and eventually send NARA) all records electronically by December 2019, according to a survey. An overreliance on manual processes and fallible end-users paired with a lack of manpower and implemented automation are driving that risk according to a survey of 150 government decision-makers released Thursday by AvePoint Public Sector and custom research firm Market Connections.”

PSN Europe: An investigation into the world of digitising and archiving

PSN Europe: An investigation into the world of digitising and archiving. “PSNEurope’s Marc Maes takes a deep dive into the world of audiovisual digitising and archiving by investigating the workings of VIAA, the Flemish Institute for Archiving, on its expansive, 12 million euro digitisation project, as well as the French-speaking RTBF and the leading Memnon Archiving services…”

PetaPixel: 10 Good Reasons Why You Need an Archive if You’re a Photographer

PetaPixel: 10 Good Reasons Why You Need an Archive if You’re a Photographer. “With digital photography, it’s now effortless to take, process and publish images. We share more than ever before on social media and we shoot twice as much than five years ago in 2013. All that data is easy to generate and it’s quite common for photographers to share their results every single day online. But there’s one thing that still requires some effort, something that many photographers overlook: archiving.”

South China Morning Post: Tapes, photos and meeting arrangements made via WhatsApp should all fall under proposed archives law, former Hong Kong official says

South China Morning Post: Tapes, photos and meeting arrangements made via WhatsApp should all fall under proposed archives law, former Hong Kong official says. “Informal consultations held by the authorities and meeting arrangements made via instant messaging apps are some of the items that should be put on the record if Hong Kong passes an archives law, a former government records official said on Friday.”

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History. “If you were to build your own time capsule, what would you want people—or alien beings—a million years from now to know about us? That we were loving, or warmongering, or dopes strung out on memes and viral videos? That we flew to the moon and made great art, ate Cinnabons (that we measured at 880 astonishing calories), and committed atrocities? How could you begin to represent these times, as lived by nearly 8 billion people? And what would give you, of all people, the right to tell the story? After these questions would come another wave of more logistical ones. Assuming the capsule was found, how would it be translated into the language of the future, whatever that language might be? And what materials could be employed that might last that long? And how could you lead a future race of beings to the capsule itself, assuming our planet might be buried under ice or oceans of red sand by then?”

Ars Technica: The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists”

Ars Technica: The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists”. “As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix. Want to read Brett Kavanaugh buddy Mark Judge’s old book, for instance (or their now infamous yearbook even)? Curious to watch a bunch of vintage smoking ads? How about perusing the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist literature in the world? There’s one place to turn today, and it’s not Google or any pirate sites you may or may not frequent.”

Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive. “In the far north of Norway, near the Arctic Circle, experts at the National Library of Norway’s (NLN) secure storage facility are in the process of implementing an astonishing plan. They aim to digitize everything ever published in Norway: books, newspapers, manuscripts, posters, photos, movies, broadcasts, and maps, as well as all websites on the Norwegian .no domain.”