Rest of World: Argentina’s Supreme Court backs Google, says “right to be forgotten” can infringe on freedom of information

Rest of World: Argentina’s Supreme Court backs Google, says “right to be forgotten” can infringe on freedom of information. “The Argentine Supreme Court denied celebrity Natalia Denegri’s petition to have content about a scandal she was involved in more than 25 years ago removed from search engines on Tuesday. It is the first ruling by a Supreme Court in Latin America on the ‘right to be forgotten,’ which allows the public to control their online history.”

Buenos Aires Times: New ancestry archive allows Argentines to track ancestors’ arrival

Buenos Aires Times: New ancestry archive allows Argentines to track ancestors’ arrival. “CEMLA has now made the historical records of immigrant arrival in Argentina available online…. Those wishing to search need the full name of the person being investigated, and the database (with information from 1800 to 1960) will reveal the ship on which their relatives sailed to Argentina, or the person’s line of work. This database comprises over 4.4 million people in total, featuring information on 200 countries of origin, over 75 years of records up to 1960, and over 3,500 vessels where they travelled to settle in this country.”

South Florida Sun-Sentinel: Argentina launches new virtual Jewish museum

South Florida Sun-Sentinel: Argentina launches new virtual Jewish museum. “Launched last month by the Centro Unión Israelita — which consists of the synagogue and a separate cultural organization — the virtual ‘museum’ includes a timeline of Córdoba’s Jewish history; a 360-degree panoramic tour of the synagogue; explainers on Jewish rituals and holidays; a global map about the places where Córdoba’s Jewish immigrants came from; testimony from a local Holocaust survivor; and an interactive map of the Jewish sites in Córdoba city (Córdoba is the name of both a province of over a million people and its largest city), which include an outdoor Israel Square and a monument to Anne Frank…”

Buenos Aires Times: Argentina surpasses 100,000 Covid-19 infections in a day

Buenos Aires Times: Argentina surpasses 100,000 Covid-19 infections in a day. “Argentina on Thursday surpassed 100,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in a single day for the first time, breaking its record high since the start of the pandemic for the third day running. The country, which since the end of 2021 has been facing a dizzying rise in coronavirus infections, is now one of the countries in Latin America where the disease is progressing most rapidly.”

Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture

Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture. “In collaboration with five cultural institutions including Gustar — an initiative of the Ministry of Culture, ArgenINTA Foundation, the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Tourism and Sports of Argentina — Google Arts & Culture’s latest project brings together all that Argentina’s gastronomic scene has to offer, from traditional fare to contemporary culinary trends.”

Unilad: Argentina Loses Its Google Domain After Random Citizen Buys It For Just $5

Unilad: Argentina Loses Its Google Domain After Random Citizen Buys It For Just $5. “Argentina temporarily lost its Google domain after a random member of the public bought it for the equivalent of around $5. Taking to Twitter yesterday, April 22, Nicolas Kuroña said a google search had shown the domain ‘google.com.ar’ was available to buy, so he bought it.”

Hyperallergic: Argentina’s Military Government May Have Stolen from Its Own Museum to Fund Falklands War

Hyperallergic: Argentina’s Military Government May Have Stolen from Its Own Museum to Fund Falklands War. “At 1am on December 25, 1980, four burglars entered the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires, Argentina, through a gap in the roof, and took 16 Impressionist works and seven early Chinese sculptures. The heist was peculiar for its seamlessness: ladders presumably left by construction workers made it easier for the thieves to break in. Two night guards keeping watch that night were tortured and arrested by state police, but no one has ever been charged with the crime to this day. And according to anecdotal accounts by witnesses, an army truck was seen parked outside the museum.”

Covid: Argentina passes tax on wealthy to pay for virus measures (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Argentina passes tax on wealthy to pay for virus measures. “Argentina has passed a new tax on its wealthiest people to pay for medical supplies and relief measures amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Senators passed the one-off levy – dubbed the ‘millionaire’s tax’ – by 42 votes to 26 on Friday. Those with assets worth more than 200 million pesos ($2.5m; £1.8m) – some 12,000 people – will have to pay.”

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals. “In a national database in Argentina, tens of thousands of entries detail the names, birthdays, and national IDs of people suspected of crimes. The database, known as the Consulta Nacional de Rebeldías y Capturas (National Register of Fugitives and Arrests), or CONARC, began in 2009 as a part of an effort to improve law enforcement for serious crimes. But there are several things off about CONARC. For one, it’s a plain-text spreadsheet file without password protection, which can be readily found via Google Search and downloaded by anyone.”

Covid-19: Protests as Argentina’s cases pass 900,000 (BBC)

BBC: Covid-19: Protests as Argentina’s cases pass 900,000. “Thousands have joined anti-government protests in Argentina as confirmed coronavirus infections continue to rise, passing 900,000 on Monday. Many Argentines are angry at the government’s handling of the crisis and the economic effect of lockdowns, as well as issues such as corruption.”

San Diego Union-Tribune: Coronavirus puts poor Argentines’ soccer dreams on hold

San Diego Union-Tribune: Coronavirus puts poor Argentines’ soccer dreams on hold. “Worried the lost time is costing them shots at professional careers, some young players are giving up and succumbing to the temptations of drugs and alcohol. Others desperate to stay in shape are playing for money in dangerous illegal games that have caused outbreaks of COVID-19 among players, spectators and people who live near soccer fields.”

Gulf Today: Argentina couple hold a virtual wedding service on social media, amidst coronavirus

Gulf Today: Argentina couple hold a virtual wedding service on social media, amidst coronavirus. “When Argentine couple Diego Aspitia and Sofia Cuggino got engaged to be married a year ago, they set a date in March, but like countless others across the globe, their wedding fell victim to the coronavirus lockdown. Argentina went into a nationwide lockdown last week and faced with a choice of whether or not to go through with their wedding plans, the couple decided to hold a virtual service, with minister, friends and family all looking on via Instagram and Facebook.”

Journalism in the Americas: Use of Instagram and WhatsApp for online news consumption grows in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico: Reuters Institute

Journalism In the Americas: Use of Instagram and WhatsApp for online news consumption grows in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico: Reuters Institute. “In the past year, the use of Instagram and WhatsApp for consuming news online has grown significantly in at least four Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. In Brazil alone, 53 percent of these consumers use WhatsApp for this purpose, the highest among 38 countries.”

National Archives: Declassified Records Shed Light on Argentine History

National Archives: Declassified Records Shed Light on Argentine History. “The largest government-to-government declassification release in United States history, the latest release represents the final stage of an effort by the U.S. Government to search, identify, review for public access, and provide records that shed light on human-rights abuses in Argentina between 1975 and 1984, committed during the military dictatorship of that nation (1976–1983).”