Arizona State University: Inspiring sustainability action through virtual field trips

Arizona State University: Inspiring sustainability action through virtual field trips. “Arizona State University sustainability scientists Rimjhim Aggarwal and Ariel Anbar were recently awarded a Grand Challenges Explorations grant, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. This grant enables the professors to pilot a project that will train students to create virtual field trips as a way to narrate their own place-based stories regarding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and share with peers globally to motivate youth action.”

Arizona State University: A leap of progress for energy-efficient intelligent computing

Arizona State University: A leap of progress for energy-efficient intelligent computing. “The need for sustainable computing platforms has motivated Jae-sun Seo and Shimeng Yu, faculty members at Arizona State University and Georgia Tech, respectively, to explore emerging memory technologies that will enable parallel neural computing for artificial intelligence.”

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations. “With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy. Retailers and free service providers like Facebook and Google reap revenue with these highly curated and targeted advertisements — but at the cost of your data. The recent increase in consumer privacy violations motivated Arizona State University Associate Professor Lalitha Sankar to develop game theoretic models that retailers and service providers can use to help them generate accurate recommendations while guaranteeing consumer privacy.”

ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you (The State Press)

The State Press: ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you. “Like something out of a sci-fi novel, Arizona State University’s High Density Collection holds within its bunkers 1.6 million books. To call it a labyrinth, like the door factory in Monsters Inc. or a football field full of books, doesn’t completely capture this ice-cold collection facility. Rather, it’s as if the Room of Requirement in Harry Potter was made to hold 6 million books, meticulously sorted into fastidious shelves.”

Arizona State University: ASU researchers develop tool to help determine a neighborhood’s walkability

Arizona State University: ASU researchers develop tool to help determine a neighborhood’s walkability. “…researchers at ASU’s College of Health Solutions, working with computer scientists at the School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering, are developing an automated, cost-effective tool that uses Google Street View (GSV), crowdsourcing, computer vision and deep learning to virtually detect a neighborhood’s microfeatures. They want to more precisely determine the correlation between the presence of certain features and the physical activity levels of its residents.”

Arizona State University: ASU Library archivists make marginalized history accessible to all

Arizona State University: ASU Library archivists make marginalized history accessible to all. “Thanks to the efforts of head project archivist [Alana] Varner and her team, a large portion of the Bj Bud Memorial Archives, the largest LGBT collection in Arizona, will soon be accessible online, to anyone, anywhere. Over the next two years, the grant will also allow for three of the library’s other unique and most consistently utilized archives to be accessed online. They are: the Maricopa County Organizing Project (MCOP) Records, detailing local farmworker and civil rights history from 1960-1990; the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) Collection, which tells the story of the oldest active Latino civil rights organization in the U.S.; and the Alianza Hispano Americana Records, which tells the story of the oldest Latino mutual aid society.”