Arizona State University: Scientists map food supply chains for every US city

Arizona State University: Scientists map food supply chains for every US city. “No matter where you are in the United States, the food on your plate probably started its life in Fresno, California. Vegetables follow a complex supply chain that moves bumper crops of delectable lettuce, tomatoes, fruits and nuts from where they’re grown to where they’re used. How do we know? New data from the FEWSION Project, led by Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University scientists, can now illustrate how every corner of America is connected.”

Arizona State University: Go ahead, try this at home

Arizona State University: Go ahead, try this at home. “From phone apps that measure light pollution to crowdsourced maps that track parasites, the process of collecting scientific data has never been so accessible or so scalable. ‘Scientists are looking for information, and people like to contribute. Citizen science is making that happen on a major scale,’ said ASU Librarian Dan Stanton, who specializes in citizen science and is coordinating Arizona State University’s participation in the fifth annual Citizen Science Day, a global event scheduled for Saturday, April 13.”

Arizona State University: Can social media breaks make you more productive?

Arizona State University: Can social media breaks make you more productive?. “This coming football season, the Arizona Cardinals will take social media breaks every 20 minutes during meetings. While Head Coach Kliff Kingsbury’s decision might seem counterproductive — at least according to the reaction of sports commentators — scientists who study attention laud it as a step in the right direction.”

Arizona State University: Inspiring sustainability action through virtual field trips

Arizona State University: Inspiring sustainability action through virtual field trips. “Arizona State University sustainability scientists Rimjhim Aggarwal and Ariel Anbar were recently awarded a Grand Challenges Explorations grant, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. This grant enables the professors to pilot a project that will train students to create virtual field trips as a way to narrate their own place-based stories regarding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and share with peers globally to motivate youth action.”

Arizona State University: A leap of progress for energy-efficient intelligent computing

Arizona State University: A leap of progress for energy-efficient intelligent computing. “The need for sustainable computing platforms has motivated Jae-sun Seo and Shimeng Yu, faculty members at Arizona State University and Georgia Tech, respectively, to explore emerging memory technologies that will enable parallel neural computing for artificial intelligence.”

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations

Arizona State University: New research aims to curb the surge of consumer privacy violations. “With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy. Retailers and free service providers like Facebook and Google reap revenue with these highly curated and targeted advertisements — but at the cost of your data. The recent increase in consumer privacy violations motivated Arizona State University Associate Professor Lalitha Sankar to develop game theoretic models that retailers and service providers can use to help them generate accurate recommendations while guaranteeing consumer privacy.”

ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you (The State Press)

The State Press: ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you. “Like something out of a sci-fi novel, Arizona State University’s High Density Collection holds within its bunkers 1.6 million books. To call it a labyrinth, like the door factory in Monsters Inc. or a football field full of books, doesn’t completely capture this ice-cold collection facility. Rather, it’s as if the Room of Requirement in Harry Potter was made to hold 6 million books, meticulously sorted into fastidious shelves.”