Eurasianet: Armenia moves to restrict internet

Eurasianet: Armenia moves to restrict internet. “Armenia’s General Prosecutor has proposed a law allowing the state to block certain internet content, citing Russia as a positive example of how such a practice might work. In a July 4 letter addressed to the government, General Prosecutor Artur Davtyan suggested that the country should adopt legal regulations allowing the government to block material on the internet it deems harmful.”

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Armenians of Whitinsville Website Unveiled at Project SAVE Webinar

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Armenians of Whitinsville Website Unveiled at Project SAVE Webinar. “On June 16, Project SAVE Armenian Photograph Archive delved into the world of Whitinsville, a small town in central Massachusetts with one of the oldest Armenian communities in the state. This presentation was cosponsored by the National Association for Armenian Studies and Research and the Armenian Cultural Center.”

USC: Retrofitted food truck documents Armenian stories in Southern California and worldwide

USC: Retrofitted food truck documents Armenian stories in Southern California and worldwide. “USC’s Institute of Armenian Studies converted a food truck into a mobile studio that travels throughout Southern California recording Armenian diasporans’ stories. The initiative, called #MyArmenianStory, is a crowd-sourced oral history project that documents the Armenian experience.”

Armenian Reporter: The National Archive and the Cinema Center will join efforts to restore old Armenian films

The Armenian Reporter: The National Archive and the Cinema Center will join efforts to restore old Armenian films . “Today, April 26, Grigor Arshakyan, Director of the National Archives of Armenia, and Shushanik Mirzakhanyan, Acting Director of the National Cinema Center of Armenia, signed a memorandum of cooperation establishing wide-ranging cooperation between the two organizations in preserving films owned by the Republic of Armenia, in the direction of digitalization and popularization.”

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Press Collection of the Vienna Mekhitarist Library Is Now Online

Armenian Mirror-Spectator: Press Collection of the Vienna Mekhitarist Library Is Now Online. “The Vienna Mekhitarist Congregation’s journal collection and its portal website are now live, featuring digitized Armenian press published between 1794 and 1920, in a free and accessible format. To date, the online library of the Mekhitarist press and its corresponding databases have been endowed with more than 400,000 pages of digitized Armenian newspapers and periodicals from the rich collection of the Mekhitarist Monastery of Vienna.”

Public Radio of Armenia: AUA Library launches ‘Digitizing Armenian Linguistic Heritage’ project

Public Radio of Armenia: AUA Library launches ‘Digitizing Armenian Linguistic Heritage’ project. “Funded by the French National Research Agency, the project aims to build the first-ever open-access and open-source unified digital linguistic platform for the whole spectrum of the Armenian language variations. In particular, annotated corpora will be compiled for Classical Armenian and Modern Western Armenian, as well as a pilot corpus for Middle Armenian, three pilot corpora for dialects, and an updated Modern Eastern Armenian corpus on the basis of the existing one.”

Daily Bruin: Armenian Image Archive aims to illuminate Armenian experience via photography

Daily Bruin: Armenian Image Archive aims to illuminate Armenian experience via photography. “The Promise Armenian Institute at UCLA partnered with a film foundation to create an image archive to recognize and celebrate decades of Armenian photography. The Promise Armenian Institute signed an official memorandum of understanding with the Armenian Film Foundation in April, said Hasmik Baghdasaryan, deputy director of the Promise Armenian Institute, in an emailed statement. This led to the creation of the Armenian Image Archive.” Six virtual exhibitions are currently available; the archives are still being populated.

Armenian Immigration to North America through the 1930s: A Compilation of Primary Sources (Armenian Weekly)

Armenian Weekly: Armenian Immigration to North America through the 1930s: A Compilation of Primary Sources. “Researching Armenian genealogy presents unique challenges, in large part due to the scarcity of records in the Armenian homeland and the scattering of families who survived the Armenian Genocide. Many Armenians immigrated to North America in the latter part of the 1800s and in the early 1900s. Fortunately, for those of Armenian descent living in the US and Canada, a tremendous amount of information can be found in primary source records of these countries to help them to learn about their Armenian families.” If you’re new to or interested in genealogy, please give this article a read. It’s a deep dive into how someone gathered genealogical information, organized it and presented it. It shows not only how he’s thinking about his data, but also what data he considers important enough to include in his calculations. […]

Asbarez: UCLA Promise Armenian Institute, Armenian Film Foundation Partner to Support Film and Photography Projects

Asbarez: UCLA Promise Armenian Institute, Armenian Film Foundation Partner to Support Film and Photography Projects . “The Promise Armenian Institute announced that it has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Armenian Film Foundation to collaborate on a range of projects that will support Armenian film and photography at the University of California, Los Angeles. On November 18, the Promise Armenian Institute will host ‘Aftermath: the Armenian Earthquake of 1988,’ the first online exhibit of the Armenian Image Archive, which will celebrate the work of Asadour Guzelian.”

Asbarez: Hagop Oshagan’s Work Now Available Online

Asbarez: Hagop Oshagan’s Work Now Available Online. “The entire oeuvre of Hagop Oshagan, one of the giants of Western Armenian Literature, is now online and easily accessible to all, free of charge. The digitized materials can be found on the website of the Digital Library of Classical Armenian Literature (Digilib) of the American University of Armenia. The project was supported by the Armenian Communities Department of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.” The Web site is in Armenian, of course, and while Google Translate handled the site navigation okay, it appeared to mangle the Oshagan works. I could make neither heads or tails of the few translated works at which I looked.

Asbarez: Armenian Museum of America Launches Fourth Virtual Series with Focus on Early Recordings

Asbarez: Armenian Museum of America Launches Fourth Virtual Series with Focus on Early Recordings . “The Armenian Museum of America in Watertown, MA, has launched its fourth online program called the Sound Archive, which is featured on its website and social media pages every month. The debut offering presents the full catalog of Mardiros Der Sarkis Tashjian and his brothers for the first time and is considered to be the earliest known Armenian sound recordings produced in the United States in the early 20th century.”

Sahan Journal: As a teen, J.P. Der Boghossian didn’t know any queer Armenians. Finally, in his 30s, he found them in books—and started his own library.

Sahan Journal: As a teen, J.P. Der Boghossian didn’t know any queer Armenians. Finally, in his 30s, he found them in books—and started his own library.. “Der Boghossian, now 39, launched the Queer Armenian Library: an online archive of literature, film, music, and art offerings by and about queer Armenians. The blog, which went live at the end of November, includes a synopsis of each work, reviews, film trailers, and instructions about where a reader can find the original material.”

Armenian Weekly: Hairenik Launches Online Digital Archive

Armenian Weekly: Hairenik Launches Online Digital Archive. “The Armenian language Hairenik newspaper began publication in 1899. Over the years, it has been published as a daily and a weekly, and currently as the Hairenik Weekly. It is the oldest continuously published Armenian newspaper in the world, last year celebrating its 120th anniversary. In 1934, the Hairenik Association began publishing an English language weekly newspaper that continues to this day as the Armenian Weekly. In total, tens of thousands of issues have been published of these storied newspapers, serving as both witness and participant to the history of the Armenian people through the lens of our region.” Two things: 1) this archive is pay-to-access, and 2) the digitizing continues.