Phys .org: Science puts historical claims to the test

Phys .org: Science puts historical claims to the test. “As any historian will tell you, we can rarely take the claims made by our ancestors at face value. The authenticity of many of the artefacts which shape our understanding of the past have been hotly debated for centuries, with little consensus amongst researchers. Now, many of these disputes are being resolved through scientific research, including two studies recently published in EPJ Plus.”

BBC: Could a computer ever create better art than a human?

BBC: Could a computer ever create better art than a human?. “Last year a portrait of Edmond Belamy sold for $432,000 (£337,000). A bit steep, you might think, for a picture of someone you’ve never heard of. And you won’t have heard of the artist either, as the picture was created by an algorithm drawing on a data set of 15,000 portraits painted between the 14th and 20th Centuries. And to be honest, it’s a bit rubbish.”

State of the art: Museum takes hi-tech look at Vermeer (Phys .org)

Phys.org: State of the art: Museum takes hi-tech look at Vermeer . “This really is state of the art research. Experts at the Mauritshuis museum in The Hague are using the latest technology to take a long, hard look at one of their most prized paintings, Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” and they are inviting the public in to watch. For two weeks starting Monday, experts are pointing a battery of high-tech machines at the 17th-century masterpiece of a young woman whose enigmatic gaze has earned her the nickname of the Dutch Mona Lisa.”

Artnet: Leonardo da Vinci Hid Invisible Drawings in His Sketches. Now High-Tech Scanners Have Brought Them to Light

Artnet: Leonardo da Vinci Hid Invisible Drawings in His Sketches. Now High-Tech Scanners Have Brought Them to Light. “Most striking of all are two blank sheets of paper that are now known to hold invisible studies for hands. High-energy X-ray fluorescence has revealed the sketches called Studies of hands for the Adoration of the Magi. The technology also clarifies how these incredible drawings managed to vanish in plain sight over the centuries. Because of the high content of copper in da Vinci’s metal stylus, a chemical reaction transformed the lines into transparent copper salt.”