The Art Newspaper: TED-style art history platform aims to promote arts education online

The Art Newspaper: TED-style art history platform aims to promote arts education online. “There was a national outcry in 2016 when the last exam board in England to offer A-level art history announced that it would drop the subject. Following a high-profile campaign by leading art world figures, including the Tate’s former director Nicholas Serota and the artists Anish Kapoor and Cornelia Parker, the exam board Pearson decided to plug the gap. But it was this rumble in art education that inspired Heni Talks, a new online platform for educational videos about art that launches today (25 April).”

Northwestern: Unprecedented study of Picasso’s bronzes uncovers new details

Northwestern: Unprecedented study of Picasso’s bronzes uncovers new details. “The international research team of scientists, art conservators and curators used the portable instruments and a robust database of alloy ‘fingerprints’ to non-invasively analyze a priceless group of 39 bronzes (cast between 1905 and 1959) and 11 painted sheet metal sculptures (from the 1960s) in the Musée national Picasso-Paris’ collection.”

ARTNews: Art Historian Sarah Lewis Is Helming the New Yorker’s Photo Instagram Account at the Moment

ARTNews: Art Historian Sarah Lewis Is Helming the New Yorker’s Photo Instagram Account at the Moment. “Truth be told, that headline just about sums it up. But to expand a bit: for the next few days, art historian Sarah Lewis is posting images on the Instagram account of the New Yorker’s photo department that she uses in the class she teaches at Harvard University on ‘art, race, and justice.’ Lewis writes, ‘What I’ve done is forced myself to answer this question: What are 15 images that chronicle America’s journey toward a more inclusive level of citizenship?'”

Hyperallergic: Zoom Through European Art History in An Endless Vortex of Paintings

Hyperallergic: Zoom Through European Art History in An Endless Vortex of Paintings. “Take a wondrous and slightly nauseating journey through western art history in a new video by Alexander Mordvintsev, which uses machine learning to create an endless vortex of paintings that zoom into one another. A software engineer at Google, Mordvintsev created DeepDream, a computer vision program that uses neural networks to interpret and generate new, often creepy images.”

University of Missouri: The Museum of Art and Archaeology’s entire collection is NOW Searchable on-line!

University of Missouri: The Museum of Art and Archaeology’s entire collection is NOW Searchable on-line!. “Thanks to a Federally-funded grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the Museum was able to digitize its entire collection as a searchable database that scholars, faculty, students and anyone needing access to the Museum’s extensive collection can use. Beyond background information on a specific piece of art, you can see an image of the object, review, save, and export information. It brings over 6,000 years of art history to your fingertips.”

The Times: Museum fees are killing art history, say academics

The Times: Museum fees are killing art history, say academics. “Historians say that they are abandoning academic projects because of a ‘tax on scholarship’ imposed by museums. The Tate and the British Museum are among institutions that charge scholars to reprint historic artworks in journals, books and lectures, even though the originals are out of copyright.”

Cornell Chronicle: Exhibition, research project highlight learning from Rembrandt’s art

Cornell Chronicle: Exhibition, research project highlight learning from Rembrandt’s art. “Watermarks are unique to each batch of paper the artist used, and can often confirm the date or edition of specific impressions. As part of the WIRE (Watermark Identification in Rembrandt’s Etchings) project at Cornell, students have been tasked with creating an online decision tree as a computational tool, which, when completed, will allow users to quickly and confidently identify watermarks from among the 54 main types and more than 500 known subvariants that appear in Rembrandt’s oeuvre, printed from some 300 plates in all.”