Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west . “On a recent Saturday in April, Muscovites strolled around GES-2, a vast new arts centre built in a disused power station steps away from the Kremlin. But guests visiting the 54,400-sq-metre centre, designed by the pioneering Italian architect Renzo Piano, were faced with one hard-to-miss problem: the art was absent. ‘It is not the time for contemporary art when people are dying and blood is spilling. We can’t pretend as if life is normal,’ said Evgeny Antufiev, a Russian artist who asked for his works to be removed from GES-2 shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February.”

New York Times: From Dalí to Picasso, a Museum With a Masterpiece Collection Partially Reopens

New York Times: From Dalí to Picasso, a Museum With a Masterpiece Collection Partially Reopens. “The vaults above inundated basements contain the region’s largest public collection of Pablo Picasso’s works, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars worth of paintings and drawings by masters such as Joan Miró, Marc Chagall and Lucian Freud. Nearby, 700 sculptures by iconic artists, including Salvador Dalí and Fernando Botero, are crammed in a large room to protect them against encroaching humidity. This is Venezuela’s Caracas Museum of Modern Art, or MACC, once a regional reference for cultural education, that has fallen victim to economic collapse and authoritarianism.”

Rappler: CCP to launch new digital museum ’21AM’

Rappler: CCP to launch new digital museum ’21AM’. “The Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) will be launching a special 50th Anniversary project, a digital museum website called 21AM, on Friday, February 25, via live stream on CCP’s Facebook page. The CCP said in a press statement that 21AM will recall their original visual arts department in 1969 called Arts Museum, which was known to form the mid-20th century visual arts avant-garde in the early years. The new online museum will present a new contemporary arts exhibition.”

The Art Newspaper: Louvre teams up with Sotheby’s to investigate provenance of works bought during the Second World War

The Art Newspaper: Louvre teams up with Sotheby’s to investigate provenance of works bought during the Second World War. “Sotheby’s and the Louvre in Paris have joined forces on a project aimed at researching items acquired by the museum between 1933 and 1945. The sponsorship deal, which lasts three years, will help fund research that ‘may lead to restitutions [incorporating] digitisation, the organisation of seminars, study days, and publications’, the Louvre says in a statement.”

My Modern Met: 151,000 Artworks Are Stored in World’s First Publicly Accessible Museum Art ‘Depot’

My Modern Met: 151,000 Artworks Are Stored in World’s First Publicly Accessible Museum Art ‘Depot’. “The Depot Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam is a highly anticipated project by Netherlands-based architecture firm MVRDV. Branded as the world’s first publicly accessible art depot, the structure will store 151,000 pieces from the nearby Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. The new station means that, unlike most museums where a large portion of the collection remains in storage, the entire body of artwork can be enjoyed by the public.”

Hyperallergic: A Portal Tracks Objects Acquired by German Institutions Through Colonialism

Hyperallergic: A Portal Tracks Objects Acquired by German Institutions Through Colonialism. “Newly launched by the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek (German Digital Library), the Collections from Colonial Contexts (CCC) portal tracks artifacts in German institutions acquired under conditions of colonialism. So far, over 8,000 objects from 25 institutions have been listed.” This is separate from the Benin bronzes database.

Modern Dream: How Refik Anadol Is Using Machine Learning and NFTs to Interpret MoMA’s Collection (MoMA Magazine)

MoMA Magazine: Modern Dream: How Refik Anadol Is Using Machine Learning and NFTs to Interpret MoMA’s Collection. “This week, on the new-media platform Feral File, artist Refik Anadol presents Unsupervised, an exhibition of works created by training an artificial intelligence model with the public metadata of The Museum of Modern Art’s collection. Spanning more than 200 years of art, from paintings to photography to cars to video games, the Museum’s collection represents a unique data set for an artist who has worked with many different public archives. The AI-based abstract images and shapes in Unsupervised are interpretations of the Museum’s wide-ranging collection, weighted toward the exhibition of new artworks at MoMA this fall.”

Bloomberg CityLab: Hong Kong’s New Museum Tries to Please Art World — and Beijing

Bloomberg CityLab: Hong Kong’s New Museum Tries to Please Art World — and Beijing. “When planning for M+ began in the early 2000s, Hong Kong was still a relatively free-wheeling place, a cosmopolitan gateway to the growing economy over the border. No more. After mass protests, the 2020 national security law made all kinds of dissent a criminal offense, leaving the staff of M+ to interpret the rapidly expanding rules governing expression. Compounding the challenge, the more than 8,000 works in the M+ collection include a HK$1.3 billion ($167 million) collection of Chinese contemporary art donated by Swiss collector Uli Sigg in 2012, featuring work by Zhang Xiaogang and noted dissident Ai Weiwei.”

The Calvert Journal: The battle to preserve Uzbekistan’s greatest art collection is moving online

The Calvert Journal: The battle to preserve Uzbekistan’s greatest art collection is moving online. “Claims of mismanagement have dogged the Nukus Museum for decades, as officials and art lovers fight between preserving Igor Savitsky’s avant-garde art collection in the desert, or bringing its masterpieces to a wider audience. Now, a new project is putting tens of Savitsy’s greatest works online — but the battle for the museum’s future is far from over.”

Google Blog: Explore impossible exhibitions in 3D

Google Blog: Explore impossible exhibitions in 3D. “Since we launched our first Pocket Gallery in 2018, the culturally curious from all across the globe have used augmented reality to step inside our ever-growing collection of virtual galleries created with the help of our partners from around the world. From the original Pocket Gallery that united all of Vermeer’s artworks for the first time in history, to the virtual construction of lost Bauhaus buildings, Pocket Gallery has brought numerous previously-impossible exhibitions to your AR-enabled smartphone. Today, we are making the entire series of Pocket Galleries available to anyone on the web, meaning they can now be explored on desktop and on mobiles with or without AR capabilities.”