New York Times: Cheech Marin’s Chicano Art Museum Is to Open This Fall

New York Times: Cheech Marin’s Chicano Art Museum Is to Open This Fall. “In the mid-1980s, Marin, buoyed by a burgeoning film career, made the leap from merely admiring Rembrandts and Vermeers in museums to acquiring work. A third-generation Mexican-American, he focuses on Chicano artists, and has amassed one of the largest such collections in the world. Now, his more than 700 paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures will have a permanent home in the former Riverside, Calif., public library.”

New York Times: Mona Lisa Is Alone, but Still Smiling

New York Times: Mona Lisa Is Alone, but Still Smiling. “From her bulletproof case in the Louvre Museum, Mona Lisa’s smile met an unfamiliar sight the other morning: Emptiness. The gallery where throngs of visitors swarmed to ogle her day after day was a void, deserted under France’s latest coronavirus confinement. Around the corner, the Winged Victory of Samothrace floated quietly above a marble staircase, majestic in the absence of selfie-sticks and tour groups. In the Louvre’s medieval basement, the Great Sphinx of Tanis loomed in the dark like a granite ghost from behind bars. Yet out of the rare and monumental stillness, sounds of life were stirring in the Louvre’s great halls.”

Vanity Fair: The Best Online Art Exhibitions to Explore During Lockdown

Vanity Fair: The Best Online Art Exhibitions to Explore During Lockdown. “Relentless rain, January blues and a mysterious lack of novelty bakes on our Instagram feeds—the U.K.’s third lockdown is proving undeniably dreary. But as we reach for our favourite sweatshirt-and-leggings ensemble and prepare for more laptop-fuelled weekends, we can thank museums and galleries around the world for keeping our cultural appetites satiated. We’ve delved into the art scene to find more online offerings, so settle in for another round of well-deserved virtual escapism.”

Daily Star: Fenimore museum places collections online

Daily Star: Fenimore museum places collections online. “Fenimore Art Museum has announced the launch of a digital database showcasing the museum’s collections of fine art, folk art and The Thaw Collection of American Indian Art. The site ‘dramatically improves online access and representation of the Museum’s holdings consisting of more than 2,000 objects and works of art,’ presenters said in a media release.”

Gabrielie Finaldi: ‘What is the National Gallery if you can’t visit and you can’t see the pictures?’ (The Art Newspaper)

The Art Newspaper: Gabrielie Finaldi: ‘What is the National Gallery if you can’t visit and you can’t see the pictures?’. “I pondered the question, what is the National Gallery if you can’t visit and you can’t see the pictures? Even during the Second World War, when the paintings were hidden for safekeeping in the bowels of the earth in Wales, the doors opened for weekday lunchtime concerts organised by the pianist Myra Hess at the behest of the director, Kenneth Clark, and not a day was missed. The gallery was perceived as a beacon for the common cultural values of society, and Clark recalled of the first concert that as the first notes of Beethoven’s Appassionata struck up: ‘It was an assurance that all our sufferings were not in vain.’”

From streets to museums: Artists archive 2020 summer of protest (Christian Science Monitor)

Christian Science Monitor: From streets to museums: Artists archive 2020 summer of protest. “As Black Lives Matter protests wane and protest murals fade, citizens, academics, and arts groups seeking to preserve the past for future generations are archiving art from this summer’s historic George Floyd protests in a myriad of physical and digital ways.”

Getty Blog: Rethinking Descriptions of Black Africans in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art

Getty Blog: Rethinking Descriptions of Black Africans in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. “Museums have much work to do. The Black Lives Matter movement’s call for social reform extends to arts institutions, bringing focus to the need for inclusivity and equity. The ways in which we present and describe artworks in our care are central to these efforts. In the Getty Museum’s Antiquities department, we have turned our attention to artifacts that depict—or have been thought to depict—Black Africans. Recognizing that many of our descriptions and titles for these objects were inadequate, we are undertaking a review of our online collection and the terms that we use. We recently completed a first batch of updates, and offer here some insights into issues that we faced.”

Ocula: Following Martial Arts Trope, Galleries Try to Be Like Water

Ocula: Following Martial Arts Trope, Galleries Try to Be Like Water. “‘You must be shapeless, formless, like water,’ said Bruce Lee, playing the part of a martial arts instructor in the ’70s cop show Longstreet. A group of galleries have adopted the same strategy for 2021, morphing in response to fast-changing circumstances. Jan Mot in Brussels, Experimenter in Kolkata, and Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg are among 21 of them taking part in the new GALLERIES CURATE initiative, which seeks to create more flow between gallery programmes around the globe.”

New York Times: Will Art Lovers Open Their Wallets for Online Tours?

New York Times: Will Art Lovers Open Their Wallets for Online Tours?. “Since the National Gallery’s blockbuster ‘Artemisia’ exhibition opened in October, art lovers have had to jump through hoops to see it. Travel restrictions have kept international visitors away, the fear of catching the coronavirus hangs over the city’s public transportation system, and rolling lockdowns — or the threat of them — have made life in England uncertain. The latest national shutdown closed the museum entirely from Nov. 5 to Dec. 2. If those circumstances make a visit to London sound unappealing, there is an alternative: a ‘virtual tour’ of the show on the museum’s website.”

Business Insider: Holograms, hashtags and hand sanitizer: here’s how fine art museums are dealing with the pandemic – aided by stimulus efforts and wealthy backers

Business Insider: Holograms, hashtags and hand sanitizer: here’s how fine art museums are dealing with the pandemic – aided by stimulus efforts and wealthy backers. “As California shifted back into a pandemic lockdown, San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art was forced last weekend to close its doors yet again. But the shutdown hadn’t stopped it from promoting its art, even if its galleries were empty. Behind the scenes, a team of SFMoMA curators have been publishing a wide-ranging catalog, including everything from artist interviews to quizzes on the museum’s history. It included a social media push on all channels with the hashtag #MuseumFromHome, which is its premier offering for the foreseeable future. ”

Museums Association: Online game enables users to curate Birmingham Museums collections

Museums Association: Online game enables users to curate Birmingham Museums collections. “The trust has formed a partnership with the recently launched online game and art platform, Occupy White Walls, which uses artificial intelligence (AI) to enable players to collect and curate their own exhibitions in a virtual world. The collaboration means that users can access an initial 200 pieces from Birmingham Museum and Gallery’s art collection to curate, design and build digital art exhibitions. The available collection includes some of the city’s most famous artworks, such as The Last of England by Ford Madox Brown and Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.”

LIST: Virtual art museums and online exhibits you can visit during pandemic (Rappler)

Rappler: LIST: Virtual art museums and online exhibits you can visit during pandemic. “In the months we’ve been in lockdown due to the pandemic, a means of escape has been through art. Whether it be books, songs, films, or a newfound passion for painting, art has been our solace. To celebrate Go To An Art Museum Day on November 9, we’ve curated a list of museums you can visit in the comfort of your homes and at your own pace.”