Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross. “In recent years, a variety of cutting-edge non-destructive imaging methods have proved to be a boon to art conservationists and archaeologists alike. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. For instance, ground-penetrating radar (radio waves) is great for locating buried artifacts, among other uses, while lidar is useful for creating high-resolution maps of surface terrain. Infrared reflectography is well-suited to certain artworks whose materials contain pigments that reflect a lot of infrared light.”

Washington Post: Artificial intelligence is restoring lost works by Klimt, Picasso and Rembrandt. Not everyone is happy about it.

Washington Post: Artificial intelligence is restoring lost works by Klimt, Picasso and Rembrandt. Not everyone is happy about it.. “Gustav Klimt’s 1900 painting ‘Philosophy’ might have been remembered as a pivotal artwork. Made at a turning point in the artist’s career, it was vividly colored, dramatically composed — even provocative in its blatant nudity and unflinching emotion. But in 1945, the work was destroyed in a fire and essentially lost to history. For decades, only black-and-white photographs of ‘Philosophy’ existed. Now, thanks to artificial intelligence, we can see the work in full color. But does the re-creation really look like the original? Does it even look like a Klimt?”

Google Blog: How machine learning revived long lost masterpieces by Klimt

Google Blog: How machine learning revived long lost masterpieces by Klimt. “Few artists enjoy such worldwide fame as Gustav Klimt. The new Google Arts & Culture online retrospective ‘Klimt vs. Klimt – The Man of Contradictions’ puts the spotlight on the artist’s eclectic work and life. A Machine Learning experiment recolored photographs of lost Klimt paintings, while a “Pocket Gallery” brings some of his most iconic works into your living room in augmented reality and 3D.”

The Guardian: Restoration work wipes smile off the face of Dutch vegetable seller

The Guardian: Restoration work wipes smile off the face of Dutch vegetable seller. “At some point in the last 400 years a painting restorer probably decided the Dutch vegetable seller was far too glum and should be smiling. Now it has been put right and she is once again enigmatic. English Heritage revealed the results on Friday of a two-year conservation project to reveal the true glory of a mysterious, unsigned painting that has been in its stores for more than 60 years.”

Artnet News: A Painting Fell Off the Wall and Went in for Conservation. Turns Out It’s a Long-Lost Rembrandt Worth Up to $240 Million

Artnet News: A Painting Fell Off the Wall and Went in for Conservation. Turns Out It’s a Long-Lost Rembrandt Worth Up to $240 Million. “The painting, The Adoration of the Magi, is believed to date from 1632 to 1633. Scholars had long believed that only copies of the picture had survived, including well-known examples in Gothenburg, Sweden, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The work had long been in the collection of a family that had no idea it was a genuine Rembrandt, until 2016, when art restorer Antonella di Francesco took it in for repairs after it fell off a wall.”

CBC: Why an Italian museum unleashed bacteria on Michelangelo’s marble masterpieces

CBC: Why an Italian museum unleashed bacteria on Michelangelo’s marble masterpieces. “When it came time to clean sculptures by Michelangelo at the Medici Chapels in Florence, Italy, conservators knew they needed a new approach. For nearly a decade, teams have been working to clean the marble works in the New Sacristy — searching for solutions that wouldn’t damage the fragile stone Michelangelo worked with to sculpt the room’s elaborate tombs. So rather than applying chemicals or using abrasives, the experts made a ‘bold decision’ to use bacteria-infused gel to clean away centuries worth of dirt and grime.”

ARTNews: U.S. House Curator Seeking $25,000 to Repair Art Vandalized During the Capitol Riots

ARTNews: U.S. House Curator Seeking $25,000 to Repair Art Vandalized During the Capitol Riots. “At the time of the attack, the National Statuary Hall to the south of the Rotunda contained 35 statues of prominent Americans, from civil rights leaders to famous inventors, as well works by artists such as Thomas Crawford and Constantino Brumidi. Though much of the collection emerged unscathed from the rampage, a 19th-century marble bust of former president Zachary Taylor was defaced with what resembled blood, while a framed photo of the Dalai Lama was stolen. A scroll featuring Chinese characters was also destroyed.”

Associated Press: Sculpture restoration work draws laughs, memories in Spain

Associated Press: Sculpture restoration work draws laughs, memories in Spain. “Restoration work on a sculpture in northern Spain has resurrected memories of a restored Christ fresco in another Spanish city eight years ago that drew ridicule as well as tourists. The latest incident concerns a relief sculpture on the exterior of an ornate office building in the city of Palencia. What was once the bust of a smiling woman now looks more like the head of a cartoon character.”

Tufts Now: The Case of the Reappearing Art

Tufts Now: The Case of the Reappearing Art . “On the rolling plateau along the border between Turkey and Armenia stand the ruins of the Cathedral of Ani, a magnificent building constructed between 989 and 1001 AD, along with many other long-abandoned churches in Ani, which was once called the City of 1,001 churches. Now thousand-year-old paintings are coming to life again on the cathedral’s walls, thanks to Christina Maranci, Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Professor of Armenian Art and Architecture at Tufts.”

Bahrain News Agency: Afghans restore art shattered by Taliban as peace deal nears

Bahrain News Agency: Afghans restore art shattered by Taliban as peace deal nears. “The [National Museum of Afghanistan]’s recovery began in earnest in 2004, during the period when the defeated Taliban quietly began to regroup. A few hundred objects have been restored in recent years. Now the museum and the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute are compiling as complete an inventory as possible in the hope of tracking down missing artifacts — and saving a digital record of the collection in case of further threat. That database is more than 99% complete, with more than 135,000 surviving pieces, the Oriental Institute says.”

New York University: NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center’s Kress Program in Paintings Conservation Awarded $1.3M in Support of Teaching, Research, and Treatment of Old Master Paintings

New York University: NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center’s Kress Program in Paintings Conservation Awarded $1.3M in Support of Teaching, Research, and Treatment of Old Master Paintings. “The Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center at NYU has been awarded a $1,375,000 grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to support the longstanding Kress Program in Paintings Conservation, inaugurated in 1989. The award sustains the unique partnership between the two organizations, which serves to educate the next generation of Old Master painting conservators and the conservation and research of invaluable artworks in the dispersed Kress Collection.”

Art Critique: The Art of Repair

Art Critique: The Art of Repair. “In a world already saturated with commodities, many of which are designed to be quickly disposed of, is it necessary for artists to make new things? I’m interested in artists like [Mierle] Ukeles, who rather than creating more objects, are instead turning to what already exists—particularly that which has been designated disgusting, irredeemable or beyond our noticing—to create artworks based in careful study, maintenance and critical repair.”