The Conversation: How Google Street View became fertile ground for artists

The Conversation: How Google Street View became fertile ground for artists. “On May 25, Google Street View celebrates its 10th birthday. A feature of Google Maps, it lets users explore cities and towns around the world – and even peer inside businesses and government institutions (including the White House). Games have sprouted out of Street View – like Geoguessr, in which players guess where in the world they’ve been randomly placed – while some users have documented funny images captured by the roving cameras of Google’s cars. But Google Street View has also provided ample fodder for artists of all stripes, inspiring a range of creative works that include photographic curation, music videos and impromptu performances.”

ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost

ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost. “China’s world famous Terracotta Army attraction has been given a digital boost thanks to the Chinese web-based encyclopedia Baidu Baike, in partnership with the Emperor Qinshihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum. Together they’ve created a large-scale, high definition ‘digital museum’ for the country’s UNESCO World Heritage site, reports China News Service.”

Phys.org: Terahertz spectroscopy—the new tool to detect art fraud

Phys.org: Terahertz spectroscopy—the new tool to detect art fraud. “When we look at a painting, how do we know it’s a genuine piece of art? Everything we see with the unaided eye in a painting – from the Australian outback images of Albert Namatjira or Russell Drysdale, to the vibrant works of Pro Hart – is thanks to the mix of colours that form part of the visible spectrum. But if we look at the painting in a different way, at a part of the spectrum that is invisible to our eyes, then we can see something very different. As our recently published research shows, it could even help us detect art fraud.”

Delaware Art Museum: Delaware Art Museum Puts Over 500 Rare Archives Online

Delaware Art Museum: Delaware Art Museum Puts Over 500 Rare Archives Online. “The Helen Farr Sloan Library & Archives has embarked upon a digitization initiative to provide free access to our most significant collections, including the John Sloan, Howard Pyle, and Samuel and Mary R. Bancroft, Jr. Pre-Raphaelite Manuscript Collections. The archives are available through the Delaware Heritage Collection, an online portal supported by the Delaware Division of Libraries at delart.org. Visitors to this new online resource are able to browse the Museum’s collections, search for specific objects, view images, and read transcripts.”

American Museum of Folk Art Gets Grant to Digitize Henry Darger Materials

From the American Museum of Folk Art: A Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. “An HCRR Foundations grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities will be used for the formative stage of efforts to preserve, digitize, and ensure wider access to the Henry Darger Papers, which will lend a greater understanding to a complex and enigmatic artist whose writings and art display ingenious creativity at the heart of interdisciplinary study in the humanities.”

Scoop NZ: Bowerbank Ninow Artist Database Launched

Scoop NZ: Bowerbank Ninow Artist Database Launched. “The artist database is an ongoing project that is updated after each auction with information about artists whose work has been included in the sale. At present, the database includes entries for eighty-five New Zealand artists from the nineteenth century to the present day, as well as 80 essays and interviews by leading curators, art writers and academics. In this way, the database will continue to grow over time as more art passes through our auction catalogues.”

Quartz: The global art scene—visualized—on a crafty, updating map

Quartz: The global art scene—visualized—on a crafty, updating map. “[Som] Vilaysack’s map—Hello Art World—scrapes Facebook for dates everywhere, and changes based on event postings…and cancelations. Users can also submit events directly, putting them on the map, literally, for all the world to see (this was a feature the engineer added by request). The map doesn’t list every artsy occurrence around the world, but Vilaysack believes it’s the most comprehensive global listing in existence.”