‘We’re fed up with scary dreams’: thieves return temple treasures in India (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘We’re fed up with scary dreams’: thieves return temple treasures in India. “Last week, the group stole 16 statues from a 300-year-old temple to Lord Balaji – an incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu – in Uttar Pradesh, police inspector Rajiv Singh told Agence France-Presse. On Monday night, they left 14 of them near the house of the temple’s chief priest in Chitrakoot district, he said. ‘They also left behind a confession letter which said they were returning the idols because they were having scary dreams,’ Singh said. The note begged for forgiveness.”

Pepperdine University: Pepperdine Libraries Adds Leigh Wiener and Frederick R. Weisman Museum Collections to Digital Collections

Pepperdine University: Pepperdine Libraries Adds Leigh Wiener and Frederick R. Weisman Museum Collections to Digital Collections. “Pepperdine Libraries has announced the addition of two new digital collections to its growing list of online resources. Scholars worldwide can now easily access photos from influential twentieth-century photographer Leigh Wiener and a selection of digitized artworks previously displayed at the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art.”

Breaking News IE: Artist attempting to display portrait of Putin filled with Ukrainian blood in Moscow

Breaking News IE: Artist attempting to display portrait of Putin filled with Ukrainian blood in Moscow. “Russian artist Andrei Molodkin has created a portrait of Russian president Vladimir Putin filled with Ukrainian blood in a protest against the invasion of Ukraine, he spoke to BreakingNews.ie about his hope to have it displayed in Moscow. While some may find this gruesome, Mr Molodkin, a former soldier in the Soviet Army, believes art and culture play a key role in taking a stand against regimes that promote war and violence.”

e-flux Announcements: New website and digital archive

e-flux Announcements: New website and digital archive. “The MIT List Visual Arts Center is thrilled to unveil a refreshed brand identity and a new website housing a robust digital archive with materials dating back to our opening in 1985 and designed with the best practices in web accessibility for the visual arts. This priority is best exemplified by the addition of our Exhibiting Artist Index where you can browse over 800 artists the List Center has presented since its founding in 1985.”

Artnet Daily: Yu-Wen Wu Asked Google How to Walk From Boston to Taipei. She Spent the Next 10 Years Turning the Directions Into an Incredible Artwork

Artnet Daily: Yu-Wen Wu Asked Google How to Walk From Boston to Taipei. She Spent the Next 10 Years Turning the Directions Into an Incredible Artwork. “It was an impossible trip—the directions included kayaking across the Pacific ocean for some three months, with a stop in Hawaii. It was also the beginning of an epic art project that would take Wu a decade, transforming the outlandish journey into a 20-foot long collage in the tradition of a Chinese landscape scroll, stored in a traditional wooden box.”

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross. “In recent years, a variety of cutting-edge non-destructive imaging methods have proved to be a boon to art conservationists and archaeologists alike. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. For instance, ground-penetrating radar (radio waves) is great for locating buried artifacts, among other uses, while lidar is useful for creating high-resolution maps of surface terrain. Infrared reflectography is well-suited to certain artworks whose materials contain pigments that reflect a lot of infrared light.”

NBC News: A woman bought a sculpture at Goodwill for $34.99. It was actually a missing ancient Roman bust.

NBC News: A woman bought a sculpture at Goodwill for $34.99. It was actually a missing ancient Roman bust.. “Laura Young, a Texas antiques dealer, thought she had found a steal when she came across a stunning statue at a Goodwill store in 2018 for just under $35. And while she suspected she had come across something ‘very special,’ little did she know the piece would turn out to be a priceless Roman bust dating back to 2,000 years.”

The Art Newspaper: How Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will reshape Eastern Europe’s cultural scene

The Art Newspaper: How Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will reshape Eastern Europe’s cultural scene. “The Pan-Slavism underpinning the Putin regime’s policies reflects a tribal nationalism, an idea of Russian supremacy in the region (if not in the world). If it takes the toll of more than 11 million Ukrainian refugees and unspeakable crimes against human lives, the Russian government’s attitude seems to be, so be it. How this impacts art and culture in the region is a complex issue for every country in Eastern Europe.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection

CBC: N.W.T. museum digitizes hundreds of fine art pieces in new online collection. “The Northwest Territories’ Prince of Wales Heritage Centre is making hundreds of its fine art items searchable online, something museum curatorial assistant Ryan Silke says will bring one of the biggest collections of northern sculptures, paintings, prints and textiles to users without leaving their home.”

New York Times: He Wrapped Landmarks in Fabric. Years Later, His Art Turned Up in a Dumpster.

New York Times: He Wrapped Landmarks in Fabric. Years Later, His Art Turned Up in a Dumpster.. “[Francis] Hines earned a pinch of critical acclaim for wrapping this and other New York City structures, including the Washington Arch, in fabric, before he disappeared from the art world. He died in 2016 at 96. His work was rediscovered a year later by Jared Whipple, a Connecticut man who found hundreds of Mr. Hines’s paintings in a dumpster and who has since made it his mission to get Mr. Hines the attention he thinks the artist deserves.”

Scottish Field: Knights Templar Beard Advice Goes Online

Scottish Field: Knights Templar Beard Advice Goes Online. “The 12th century advice on why excessive facial hair wasn’t needed is part of 240 documents digitised by the library, thanks to a donation from Alexander Graham, the television producer behind the genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are? The manuscripts – which date from the 9th to the 16th centuries – also include ‘stunning illuminations, medieval doodles, [and] zodiac medical material’.”