Vice: This Artist Is Hacking Google to Create Surreal Street View Art

Vice: This Artist Is Hacking Google to Create Surreal Street View Art. “As a Google contractor, [Jason] Isolini worked as an intermediary between businesses and Google. At the request of businesses, he would capture 360-images inside business establishments and upload them to Google Maps. Now, Isolini is using the same method to create art on Google Maps. But instead of capturing true-to-live panorama images, he is uploading surreal collages that subvert the purpose of Google Maps: to be a tool that brings users from their current location to a business.”

Art Zoom: Masterpieces up close through the eyes of famous musicians (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Art Zoom: Masterpieces up close through the eyes of famous musicians. “What if you could see art through an artist’s eyes? On the occasion of the 130th anniversary of Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night,’ Google Arts & Culture is introducing Art Zoom, a new way to discover details of iconic works of art. Produced by musical experience creators La Blogothèque, the video series introduces you to visual masterpieces through the eyes of your favorite musicians.”

Islamic Painted Page: Growing a Database (Asian and African Studies Blog)

New-to-me and recently updated, from the Asian and African Studies Blog: Islamic Painted Page: Growing a Database. “Since its launch in 2013, Islamic Painted Page (IPP) has grown into a major online database of Islamicate arts of the book, with over 42,000 references to paintings, illuminations and bindings from over 270 collections around the globe – of which the British Library is one of the most important…. The website enables users to search by picture description, collection, accession number, date, place of origin, manuscript title or author, or publication – or any combination of these.”

The Getty Iris: Inside a New Online Exhibition Featuring the Getty’s Bauhaus Archives

The Getty Iris: Inside a New Online Exhibition Featuring the Getty’s Bauhaus Archives. “Launching today on getty.edu is the online exhibition Bauhaus: Building the New Artist, which has been more than a year in the making. The exhibition explores the Bauhaus school’s unique approach to teaching and learning through rare materials from the Getty’s archives. It also offers interactive features that invite you to try your hand at student exercises developed by Bauhaus luminaries Vassily Kandinsky and Josef Albers, as well as a customized animation of Oskar Schlemmer’s iconic theater production The Triadic Ballet.”

The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index

The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index. “After four years of work, the Getty Provenance Index® has greatly expanded its database of German art sales catalogs, adding nearly 570,000 records of artwork sales for the years 1900 to 1929. This expansion, adding to existing records for the years 1930 to 1945, gives researchers in provenance and the art market unprecedented information on auction sales in Germany and Austria during the volatile years of the early twentieth century, including the periods of World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the years of politically sanctioned Nazi looting prior to and during World War II.”

Google Blog: Meet the Brazilian “Painter of the People,” Candido Portinari

Google Blog: Meet the Brazilian “Painter of the People,” Candido Portinari. “Today, in collaboration with six Brazilian museums including Projeto Portinari and Pinacoteca, Google Arts & Culture is launching a comprehensive collection about Cândido Portinari to honor the works of one of the most important Brazilian artists. It’s the first time people will be able to enjoy his collection of over 5,000 pieces of art, thousands of letters and documents from his personal archive and curated stories about Portinari’s art, life and legacy.”

Forbes: Finding A Way To Make Digitizing Art Collections Profitable

Forbes: Finding A Way To Make Digitizing Art Collections Profitable. “Institutions that hold the world’s art have often been slow to create user-friendly digital databases and websites to display their collections (not to mention their retail). The challenges are clear: collections are vast with a majority of works in storage, building new websites and painstakingly cataloging photos of pieces is expensive, and keeping these colossal digital collections up-to-date technologically is difficult.”