The Guardian: Museums on prescription: Brussels tests cultural visits to treat anxiety

The Guardian: Museums on prescription: Brussels tests cultural visits to treat anxiety. “A tour of ancient sewers? An encounter with a masterpiece of 16th-century lace-making? These are two of the therapies on offer to people in Brussels suffering from depression, stress or anxiety. From this month, psychiatrists in one of the city’s largest hospitals have been able to offer patients ‘museum prescriptions’, a free visit with a few friends or family members to discover one or more of Brussels’ cultural institutions.”

Phys .org: Support for art and other cultural objects can be strengthened by highlighting their collective value

Phys .org: Support for art and other cultural objects can be strengthened by highlighting their collective value. “New research into the sacredness of artistic objects shows that it’s possible to get people to see just about any artwork as sacred—even an amateur drawing—so long as they believe that the art connects humanity to something bigger than itself. And when people do that, they are more willing to put themselves out to ensure it’s protected.”

Long Island Press: NY Museums to Disclose Artwork Looted by Nazis

Long Island Press: NY Museums to Disclose Artwork Looted by Nazis. “Museums in New York that exhibit artworks looted by Nazis during the Holocaust are now required by law to let the public know about those dark chapters in their provenance through placards displayed with the stolen objects. At least 600,000 pieces of art were looted from Jewish people before and during World War II, according to experts. Some of that plunder wound up in the world’s great museums.”

Hyperallergic: Announcing the Inaugural Center for Craft Archive Fellows

Hyperallergic: Announcing the Inaugural Center for Craft Archive Fellows. “The recipients of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Archive Fellowship are Xenobia Bailey, Jeffrey Gan, Elizabeth G. Greenlee and N.E. Brown, Siera Hyte, Maru López, and Olivia Quintanilla. For their six projects, they will receive grants of $5,000 to explore and analyze archives of their choosing, allowing them to engage in both conventional and innovative approaches to archival research.”

Google Blog: Digitizing artwork to share Puerto Rican culture around the globe

Google Blog: Digitizing artwork to share Puerto Rican culture around the globe . “10 museums and archives in Puerto Rico have come together through a partnership with Google Arts & Culture, Lin-Manuel Miranda and myself to launch Puerto Rico: The Sum of Its Arts. This new, digital exhibition is an immersive experience of Puerto Rico’s rich multicultural heritage through over 60 expert stories and exhibits, curated from over 1,100 artworks and artifacts by our partners.”

Online arts and culture engagement can have a positive impact on young people’s mental health: Oxford study (Oxford University)

Oxford University: Online arts and culture engagement can have a positive impact on young people’s mental health: Oxford study. “Researchers found a link between engaging in online arts and culture and mental health, with participants in both trial groups reporting a reduction in psychological distress at the end of the pilot study, despite the pilot study being conducted at a time of increased Covid restrictions.”

Artnet: A.I.R. Gallery Broke Barriers by Showing Women and Nonbinary Artists. Now the Collective’s Story Is Finally Being Told

Artnet: A.I.R. Gallery Broke Barriers by Showing Women and Nonbinary Artists. Now the Collective’s Story Is Finally Being Told. “Today marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of Artists in Residence, Inc. (A.I.R. Gallery), the first nonprofit artist-run cooperative gallery for women artists in the United States. In recognition of that milestone, the organization is launching a new digital archive and exhibition that covers the first half of its history.”

University of Chicago: Is a book hidden inside a decades-old piece of concrete? Scientists seek answers to art mystery

University of Chicago: Is a book hidden inside a decades-old piece of concrete? Scientists seek answers to art mystery. “The piece in question is called Betonbuch, or Concrete Book, and is the work of German-born artist Wolf Vostell. He was part of Fluxus, an international community of experimental creators that flourished in the 1960s and 1970s, and was a pioneer of using concrete as a material for art, not just construction. In 1971, Vostell wrote a short book called Betonierungen, or Concretifications, and as evidence of his commitment to the material, he purportedly encased 100 copies of that book in numbered slabs of concrete.”

How-To Geek: This AI Art Gallery Is Even Better Than Using a Generator

How-To Geek: This AI Art Gallery Is Even Better Than Using a Generator. “Lexica is a search engine and art gallery for artwork created with Stable Diffusion, one of the more popular AI art models. The site was created by Sharif Shameem, who hopes it ‘makes Stable Diffusion prompting a bit less of a dark art and more of a science.’” If my RB queue is any indication, we’re going to be seeing LOTS of AI art collections. I’ll try to avoid them overrunning the newsletter.

Phys .org: Do art museums prioritize visitor well-being enough?

Phys .org: Do art museums prioritize visitor well-being enough?. “By design, art museums are meant to showcase beautiful objects and their creators, offer insight into history, and elicit wonder and awe. A recent study by Penn’s Katherine Cotter and James Pawelski revealed that people who visit art museums experience a range of benefits from doing so. But when it comes to visitor well-being, how do art museum professionals think their institutions are faring?”

WIRED: A Spotlight on the Art of Video Games

WIRED: A Spotlight on the Art of Video Games. “It’s hard, walking around MoMA’s exhibit, not to think of Gabrielle Zevin’s Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, a novel about the making of video games and the way a group of people creates them together—and then plays them together. I also couldn’t shake the memory of something Zevin told my colleague Will Bedingfield: Nowadays, almost everyone is a gamer. ‘If you’re playing Facebook, if you’re playing Instagram, if you’re playing on a social media network—as in, using one—you are playing a game,’ she said, ‘it’s just a sort of dull game with no end.’” Unless you’re on Twitter, then it’s an endless game of bumper cars, only the cars are on fire and have rocket launchers.