The New York Times: How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It

The New York Times: How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It. “One secret to longevity as a pundit is to issue predictions that can’t be easily checked. So here’s one for the time capsule: Two hundred years from now, give or take, the robot-people of Earth will look back on the early years of the 21st century as the beginning of a remarkable renaissance in art and culture.”

Someone Created a Bob Ross / ‘The Joy of Painting’ Episodes Database

Found via Reddit: someone created a Bob Ross / ‘The Joy of Painting’ episodes database. 403 episodes are listed, with some available via the official Bob Ross YouTube channel. You can even search the paintings by color. I find the headline font a bit irritating, but otherwise it’s really nicely done.

U of Illinois: University of Illinois Library launches open-access digital publishing network

From the University of Illinois: University of Illinois Library launches open-access digital publishing network. “The University of Illinois Library has launched a digital publishing initiative, the Illinois Open Publishing Network, with its first work – a new English translation of a memoir of Claude Monet…. The publishing network is a network of open-access scholarly publications and publishing infrastructure and resources. It is the result of the first year and a half of a research initiative, Publishing Without Walls, funded by a four-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.”

TheNextWeb: Prisma’s new filter creator lets you copy any art style with AI

TheNextWeb: Prisma’s new filter creator lets you copy any art style with AI. “Prisma, that app that turns your photos into paintings using AI, is about to get a ton of new filters. First off, the app is launching an in-app ‘store’ to download new filters. We say that in quotes, because so far, all the filters are free. Prisma says it will be adding new styles every week, and is looking to ramp up to daily additions.”

New Online Collection of Vintage Japanese Animation (Until the End of 2017)

Now available until the end of 2017: a collection of vintage Japanese animation. “Of special note is the inclusion of Junichi Kouchi’s The Dull Sword, the oldest surviving piece of Japanese animation (circa 1917)…. The archive contains some 64 animated films dated from 1917-1941, as well as profiles of various creators.” I had to use Chrome to translate the site, but after that was able to navigate without difficulty and watch some animation.

This Week is #ColorOurCollections Week

Did you know it’s Color Our Collections week at libraries everywhere? “The inaugural event grew out of a Twitter exchange between the New York Academy of Medicine and the Biodiversity Heritage Library. As it turns out, prints of woodcuts and engravings are just waiting to be colored in.” There’s not a lot of information in this article, but you can also search Twitter for #ColorOurCollections and you’ll find plenty.

Bowdoin: Celebrating Bowdoin’s Molinari Medals and Plaquettes [Digital Archive]

In development: a digital archive of medals and plaquettes. “Modeled after ancient precedents, medals and plaquettes, which emerged during the Renaissance, celebrated political, religious, and cultural leaders, as well as commemorating transformative events. The Molinari collection, one of the most distinguished in the United States, features masterpieces designed by leading Renaissance, Rococo, and Neoclassical artists, including Pisanello, Matteo de Pasti, Francesco da Sangallo, Guillaume Dupré, Nicolas Marie Gatteaux, and David d’Angers.” The archive is expected to launch this spring.