La Crosse Tribune: Collection of Odin Oyen art expands UW-La Crosse archive

La Crosse Tribune: Collection of Odin Oyen art expands UW-La Crosse archive. “Oyen headed a La Crosse artisan firm in the early 1900s that specialized in providing interior design — especially paintings and murals — for courthouses, libraries, schools, theaters, churches and buildings throughout the Midwest.”

Medium: We’re open! — Thoughts on building a new home for SMK’s online collection

Medium: We’re open! — Thoughts on building a new home for SMK’s online collection. “It’s alive. After months (ok years) of discussion, iteration, and intense testing we’ve now opened the digital door to SMK’s new online collection. We are truly thrilled to be able to contribute to SMK — and openglam — goals of making cultural heritage easily available in friendly, open formats.” SMK is the National Gallery of Denmark.

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. “Led by Lehigh University, a partnership of 15 Philadelphia-area libraries has scanned and digitized more than 160,000 pages from 475 original manuscripts, the earliest dating to the ninth century. The hand-lettered and illustrated pages range from brightly hued, gold-leafed illuminated works of art to functional texts intended for students of science, philosophy and religion.”

Art Forum: Noguchi Museum Launches Digital Archive

Art Forum: Noguchi Museum Launches Digital Archive. “The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum (the Noguchi Museum) in Long Island City, New York, has announced the launch of its Isamu Noguchi Archive. The digitization initiative was part of a multiyear project to make the sculptor’s works more accessible to the public. More than sixty thousand objects including project records, press clippings, correspondence, and other archival materials as well as twenty-eight thousand images of Noguchi’s artworks, exhibitions and studios, and international travels are now available online.”

New York Times: Superhero or Supervillain? Technology’s Role Changes Comic Books

New York Times: Superhero or Supervillain? Technology’s Role Changes Comic Books. “Comic books have been around since the 1930s, each story taking shape as it moves from its writer to its artists (usually a penciler and an inker) and then to its letterer and colorist. Today, that team effort, which also includes an editor reviewing the work and mindful of deadlines, remains largely the same. But while the way writers and editors work is relatively unchanged, computers and technology have broadened the options for illustrators — some of whom have traded pencils and inks for styluses — and revolutionized the roles of letterers and colorists, in speed, output and artistry.”

Library of Congress: Newly Digitized Veterans History Project Collection Showcasing Veteran Artists

Library of Congress: Newly Digitized Veterans History Project Collection Showcasing Veteran Artists. “Researchers, veterans and their families now have access to ‘Veterans and the Arts,’ an online ‘Experiencing War’ website feature highlighting the stories of veterans who pursued the arts during their post-military lives. This new feature includes nine digitized collections from the Veterans History Project (VHP) archive, each of which holds the first-person narrative of a veteran who used artistic endeavors – such as music, creative writing, sculpture, ceramic arts and even the culinary arts –to assist in the transition to civilian life after serving.”

Washington Secretary of State: Giving New Voice To Thomas Handforth, A Northwest Artist With Global Perspective

Washington Secretary of State: Giving New Voice To Thomas Handforth, A Northwest Artist With Global Perspective. “Best known for his children’s book Mei Li, which won the 1939 Caldecott Medal for illustration, Handforth was born in Tacoma, and studied art at the University of Washington…. In 1982, TPL’s Northwest Room received the Handforth Collection from the Handforth family. More than 70 years following the artist’s death, this collection of Handforth’s unpublished work has finally entered the public domain. Through the Washington Digital Heritage grant, TPL digitized over 300 of Handforth’s drawings, prints, letters, and paintings.”