The Guardian: Smartify makes all museum audio tours free for rest of 2020

The Guardian: Smartify makes all museum audio tours free for rest of 2020. “Stories behind art treasures such as Delacroix’s The Death of Sardanapalus in the Louvre and a 19th-century relief of Phaeton driving the Chariot of the Sun at the Royal Academy of Arts are to made free for the rest of the year by the world’s most downloaded museum app. Smartify is often known as the ‘Shazam for art’ app in that it allows people to identify works of art by simply scanning them on a smartphone. It has about 2m artworks from more than 120 venues.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Shuttered Museums Use Social Media to Share Bouquets of Floral Artwork

Smithsonian Magazine: Shuttered Museums Use Social Media to Share Bouquets of Floral Artwork. “Last week, museums started showing love to one another by posting photos of floral artwork labeled with the hashtag #MuseumBouquet, reports Noor Brara for artnet News. The New-York Historical Society and the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden kicked off the trend by sending digital bouquets to other art institutions. The former shared its first petaled missive—a cluster of apple blossoms painted by American artist Martin Johnson Heade—with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, while the latter sent Tate Britain ‘a little cheer’ in the form of an Andy Warhol bouquet.”

Building Vermont Art Online: Virtual tours of the state’s art museums (Rutland Herald)

Rutland Herald: Building Vermont Art Online: Virtual tours of the state’s art museums. “Sarah Laursen and Sarah Briggs are in the process of creating a statewide online hub for visual arts. It may be the only site of its kind in Vermont, and soon it will be host to virtual tours, online activities for home and links to art centers all over the state.”

Yahoo Lifestyle: Museum challenges people in self-quarantine to recreate favorite works of art with objects at home

Yahoo Lifestyle: Museum challenges people in self-quarantine to recreate favorite works of art with objects at home. “The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, aka the Getty, is currently closed to the public as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. But the institution is doing its part to keep the art-loving community engaged during this difficult time, by challenging people to create their favorite works of art with objects at home.”

ArtsHub: Digital art guide to beat coronavirus closures

ArtsHub: Digital art guide to beat coronavirus closures. “The world may be in lockdown, but self-isolation doesn’t mean we have to stop experiencing art. Despite COVID-19 closures, Australian art is finding new ways to go viral. Artists, museums, galleries, institutions, and more are exploring innovative ways to reach audiences, spreading some timely comfort and unity. Below is our ever-growing list of Australian art ready for you to discover.” Decent-sized list, good annotation.

The Star (Malaysia): Malaysian art scene not digitally savvy enough to adapt to Covid-19 crisis

The Star (Malaysia): Malaysian art scene not digitally savvy enough to adapt to Covid-19 crisis. “When visits to art galleries are out of the question, what happens next? Many local galleries in Malaysia are looking to engage with their audience online. Their doors might be closed to the public until April 14 (the last day of the Government’s movement control order to contain the Covid-19 outbreak), but they are trying to find new ways to reach out to people. Behind the scenes, it is business as usual – as much as they can get it to be anyway.”

Washington Post: The arts will recover from the coronavirus, as they did after 9/11. But they might look a lot different.

Washington Post: The arts will recover from the coronavirus, as they did after 9/11. But they might look a lot different.. “As the extent and impact of the coronavirus situation have become ever more clear this week, arts and cultural leaders are dealing with myriad unknowns particular to their fields and specialties. Zoos and natural history museums have living collections that require constant care, no matter what is happening in the outside world. Art museums borrow and loan art. Should they find staff to return borrowed works that are now shuttered inside mostly empty buildings?”