University of California Santa Barbara: A Virtual Revolution

UCSB: A Virtual Revolution. “Laila Shereen Sakr, an assistant professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Film and Media Studies, is using billions of social media posts to create a revolutionary work of art. Using a program she developed — the R-Shief Media System, which has been collecting and analyzing social media posts since 2008 — she’s building a virtual reality (VR) world that gives form to those countless tweets.”

Taiwan Today: NPM offers free access to images of precious artworks

Taiwan Today: NPM offers free access to images of precious artworks. “A total of 71,640 images of precious artifacts in the National Palace Museum’s collections can be downloaded free of charge effective immediately, according to the Taipei City-based art institution July 7. The NPM said the first set of data available online comprises 1,640 medium-resolution images of famed artworks and 70,000 low-resolution images of artifacts, calligraphy and paintings in its holdings.”

Pipedream Comics: Help the British Library to preserve and catalogue UK digital comics

Pipedream Comics: Help the British Library to preserve and catalogue UK digital comics. “A new project at the British Library is focusing on digital comics publishing in the UK, and the challenges of preservation and access in the long term. Since April 2013, the British Library has been able to collect material published in the UK in digital form under Legal Deposit regulations. This change was intended to ensure that “born digital” publications, which can be at risk of loss, are preserved in the national collections of Legal Deposit Libraries (for more on Legal Deposit, please see http://www.bl.uk/aboutus/legaldeposit). However, digital comics can present challenges for collection and preservation over the long term – as they may be dependent on third-party platforms or plug-ins and otherwise may not be suitably gathered by web harvesting.” There was a BL contact mentioned in this article, and I have contacted her for more details.

This is Colossal: Text SFMOMA Your Favorite Emoji and Receive an Artwork From Their Vast Collection

Filed under “Useful-for-a-given-value, but neat,” from This Is Colossal: Text SFMOMA Your Favorite Emoji and Receive an Artwork From Their Vast Collection. “The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s newest tech tool allows any smartphone user to gain access to the artworks hidden behind their archive doors, a collection so large that it would stretch 121.3 miles if you placed each artwork end-to-end. With only 5% of this collection on view, the museum decided to create Send Me SFMOMA, a texting service that delivers an artwork to your phone based on a sent emoji or phrase.”

Stanford: Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized with help of Stanford researchers

Stanford: Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized with help of Stanford researchers. “A team including Stanford researchers created a new digital archive to study Rome’s transformation over the centuries. The exhibit, which went online in the spring, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.”

Hyperallergic: New Open-Source Platform Maps the Provenances of Artworks

Hyperallergic: New Open-Source Platform Maps the Provenances of Artworks. “Launched by Boston University professor Jodi Cranston, Mapping Paintings is an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of sales or transactions. It allows you to select artworks of interest and visualize their records across time and space, as plotted on a map.”

May It Please the Court: “Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustration” (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: May It Please the Court: “Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustration”. “‘Drawing Justice: The Art of Courtroom Illustration,’ a new exhibition at the Library of Congress, showcases the Library’s extensive collections of original art by talented artists hired by both newspapers and television to capture the personal dynamics of legal trials. Skilled at quickly conveying both individual likenesses and the atmosphere of the courtroom, these artists reveal, in intimate detail, the dramatic and, at times, mundane aspects of trial proceedings. Artists often pay attention to details like understated dress, expensive suits, a stylish hat, or clothing more appropriate for a party than a sentencing, offering insight into changing trends in fashion.”