Indiana University: Indiana University and Uffizi Gallery unveil website featuring first set of 3D, digitized artifacts

Indiana University: Indiana University and Uffizi Gallery unveil website featuring first set of 3D, digitized artifacts. “As a result of a collaboration between Indiana University and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy, it’s now possible to view some of the world’s most admired ancient artifacts and sculptures in 3D without traveling overseas.”

MakeUseOf: The 10 Best Sites to Learn About Art History

MakeUseOf: The 10 Best Sites to Learn About Art History . “Art history is a vast topic. From the pottery of ancient Greece to the contemporary pop art of the 1960s, there are millions of artists across hundreds of styles that you can sink your teeth into. Even if you’re generally not ‘into art,’ you’ll still be able to find something that resonates with your soul. Here are some of the best sites to learn about art history.”

Hyperallergic: A New Online Project Rethinks How We Learn About Artists and Archive Their Life and Work

New-to-me, from Hyperallergic: A New Online Project Rethinks How We Learn About Artists and Archive Their Life and Work. “In 2015, [Glenn] Wharton joined his colleague Deena Engel at New York University to establish the Artist Archives Initiative, a forum to promote the research and dissemination of knowledge about the display and care of contemporary art. The initiative is also strategic, responding to the art world’s growing need for a thorough network of documents and research to aid future exhibitions and the reengagement of interest in previously forgotten artists.”

Mashable: Belgian museums are uniting in protest against Facebook over artistic nudity ban

Mashable: Belgian museums are uniting in protest against Facebook over artistic nudity ban. “Belgian museums are banding together to take on Facebook over the social media giant’s rules on nudity, specifically of the artistic variety. The Flemish Tourist Board is trying to convince Facebook to change its rules over how it treats artistic nudity from Flemish Masters such as Peter Paul Rubens. The tourist board, Visit Flanders, points out that its Facebook postings with images containing artistic nudity are often removed by the company when they try to promote them.”

NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back

NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back . “‘We removed your post because it doesn’t follow [Instagram’s] community guidelines. If you violate our guidelines again, your account may be restricted or disabled.’ That vague, fateful warning is one Gio Black Peter has received time and time again. To date, Peter, a queer New York-based visual artist, has cycled through 10 Instagram accounts, 15 Facebook pages, two YouTube accounts, and four Vimeo profiles. And he’s not alone: For queer fine artists‚ particularly those whose work includes nudity, censorship on social media is an unfortunate reality. These platforms—all vital networking assets and creative tools for working artists in the digital age—are notorious for their harsh censorship practices, especially when it comes to nudity.” The nudity in the images accompanying this article is blocked out.

Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors. “Rubens nudes have entranced those visiting the world’s great art galleries for some 400 years. Contemporaries on whom the Flemish master is said to have had a profound impact include Van Dyck and Rembrandt … but none of this has passed muster with Facebook’s censors.”

INTERPOL: Enhancing The Fight Against The Illicit Traffic Of Cultural Property

INTERPOL: Enhancing The Fight Against The Illicit Traffic Of Cultural Property. “With crimes against cultural heritage often linked to serious transnational crime, only a fraction of such offences are reported to national and international law enforcement. INTERPOL’s Stolen Works of Art database has been addressing this traditional underreporting since 1995, and today, has taken a step which will lead to enhanced information exchange. In cooperation with the Italian Carabinieri’s Headquarters for the Protection of Cultural Heritage, INTERPOL has launched an enhanced version of its Stolen Works of Art database, called P.SY.C.HE. (Protection System for Cultural Heritage).”