BBC: Antiquities looted in Syria and Iraq are sold on Facebook

BBC: Antiquities looted in Syria and Iraq are sold on Facebook. “Facebook is being used by networks of traffickers to buy and sell looted antiquities, the BBC has learned. Private groups also discuss how to illegally excavate ancient tombs, according to research by academics. Facebook says it has removed 49 groups following the BBC’s investigation.”

Elon University: Irons integrates 3D printing technology and history for interactive hands-on learning

Elon University: Irons integrates 3D printing technology and history for interactive hands-on learning. “When teaching Elon undergraduates about enslavement in 19th century America, Professor of History Charles Irons aspired to bring the era to life in the classroom. He wanted his students to think more concretely about the realities of slavery that can be difficult to grasp. This quest led Irons to incorporate 3D-printed artifacts from the time period into his teaching.”

Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities (Artnet)

Artnet: Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities. “Using their expert knowledge of archaeology, a sophisticated new database, and plenty of detective work, the dedicated team at the British Museum is working closely with colleagues in Cairo and Khartoum to identify problematic objects and expose fictitious provenances. They are also looking for works currently on offer at auction houses, galleries, and on websites such as eBay set off alarm bells. If there is evidence that could lead to an object’s recovery and repatriation, the British Museum reports the information to law enforcement agencies, including Scotland Yard and US Customs.”

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past. “In a tech-savvy world, SDSU’s Classics department is adopting more innovative means in which students can take a look at ancient artifacts – without having to travel thousands of miles across the globe. ‘Some of the most important pieces are sherds … there’s one piece in New York, four pieces in Florence, two pieces in Paris in the Louvre,’ Dr. Danielle Bennett, a professor in the Humanities department said. ‘3D design is going to bring them all together in the digital library.'”

Tech Xplore: A new algorithm for solving archaeological puzzles

Tech Xplore: A new algorithm for solving archaeological puzzles. “A team of researchers at Technion and the University of Haifa have developed a new computer vision approach for solving archaeological puzzles. In their paper, pre-published on arXiv, they introduce a general algorithm that can automatically reassemble fragments of archaeological artifacts.”

Quartz: Thailand wants US museums to give its art back

Quartz: Thailand wants US museums to give its art back . ” In 2014, DHS returned 554 ancient artifacts taken from the World Heritage archaeological site Ban Chiang that had been displayed in a museum in Santa Ana, California. Since then, the Thai ministry of culture has stepped up recovery efforts, and on Nov. 6 Artnet News reported that Thailand is demanding the return of 23 antiquities housed in the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, and New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, among other places.”

When you fight the good fight: tracking down stolen idols (The Hindu)

The Hindu: When you fight the good fight: tracking down stolen idols. “In his new book, Vijay Kumar explains how a network of history buffs tracks down stolen idols using WhatsApp and crowdsourced sleuthing In times when WhatsApp has been looked down upon as the purveyor of fake news, S Vijay Kumar, a Singapore-based shipping company manager and his friends at India Pride Project have been using it to fight crime.”