Boing Boing: Neural net-generated prompts for Inktober

Boing Boing: Neural net-generated prompts for Inktober. “It’s Inkotober, when ‘artists all over the world take on the Inktober drawing challenge by doing one ink drawing a day the entire month.’ In a fun experiment, Janelle Shane trained a neural net with prior Inktober prompts and picked out some promising concepts like ‘ornery beach sheep’ and ‘BUG IN HUMAN SHAPE.'”

Fairfield Sun Times: World’s largest collection of Will James’ work at risk without preservation

Fairfield Sun Times: World’s largest collection of Will James’ work at risk without preservation. “James died in 1942. The bulk of his possessions, including drawings, manuscripts, letters, paintings, his saddle, and even a pair of walrus skin saddle bags, were left with his longtime friends Earl and Elanora Snook and later gifted to the Yellowstone Art Museum by their daughter, Virginia Snook. But that generous gift came with a huge catch — the collection must remain in Billings, intact.”

Bates College: Fueled by $192,000 grant, Bates museum to publish catalog of art by Marsden Hartley

Bates College: Fueled by $192,000 grant, Bates museum to publish catalog of art by Marsden Hartley. “Thanks to a major grant to Bates College from a foundation dedicated to the arts, creation has begun of the first-ever comprehensive, publicly accessible guide to all known artworks by Marsden Hartley, a pioneer of American Modernism.”

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists

CBC: Online database for Inuit art looking for Nunatsiavut artists. “The Inuit Art Foundation is looking for Nunatsiavut artists to add to their growing online database, which highlights Inuit artists from across Canada. The IAF’s goal is to broaden the public’s awareness of the history of Inuit art and to connect artists with researchers or anyone who is interested in the art an artist creates.”

Mada: The end of revolution, the return of nostalgia: Hany Rashed’s Baba Museum

Mada: The end of revolution, the return of nostalgia: Hany Rashed’s Baba Museum. “As a child, the artist Hany Rashed waited for his father, Salah, to come home so he could sit by him and watch as he unloaded strange objects from bulging pockets. What would he pull out today? Salah Rashed, who worked at Maspero, the headquarters of the Egyptian Radio and TV Union, mined the streets, shops, and his day-to-day life for things — keys, locks, rosaries, stones — which he kept safe in a closet, declared off limits.”

MIT Technology Review: Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks

MIT Technology Review: Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks. “One job of the art historian is to tease apart this web, to study the human poses used by different artists and glimpse the forces that influenced them. Today, that gets easier thanks to the work of Tomas Jenicek and Ondrej Chum at the Czech Technical University in Prague. These guys have used a machine vision system to analyze the poses of human subjects in fine art paintings throughout history. They then search for other paintings that contain people in the same poses.”

Artnet: Want to Visit Monet’s Giverny Gardens From Your Desk? Here Are 11 Historic Artists’ Homes You Can See on Google Street View

Artnet: Want to Visit Monet’s Giverny Gardens From Your Desk? Here Are 11 Historic Artists’ Homes You Can See on Google Street View. “Seeing artist studios is interesting for a host of reasons. Some, such as the gardens at Monet’s retreat Giverny, are very much a part of the legend of the artists themselves. Others, such as Eugene Delacroix’s final apartment, offer insight into the environment that informed their work. Still others, including the nondescript street where Magritte spend years working out his Surrealist delights, offer a sense of what their imagination had to define itself against. Here, we’ve tracked down 11 historic sites where artists lived and worked that you can see in handy 3D image form without even leaving your chair.”