Getty Blog: New Database Underway Recording Sixty Years of Getty Publications

Getty Blog: New Database Underway Recording Sixty Years of Getty Publications. “Greg Albers, digital publications manager at Getty Publications, is leading a project to collect and provide access to information on every Getty book published since Publications’ origins in 1954….Publications staff is actively adding to the database now, and the public-facing component will go live within an expanded version of the Virtual Library, which currently features just over 300 downloadable backlist books. The expanded version will launch later in 2017, and will include a record for every book published by the Getty.”

The Getty: 30,000 Getty Museum Images Published Online as IIIF

The Getty: 30,000 Getty Museum Images Published Online as IIIF. “Today we published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection on Getty.edu using IIIF. You can see and click on the red-and-blue logo underneath the main image of any of the Museum collections, such as Van Gogh’s Irises, to explore our content through any IIIF-compatible viewer….IIIF (pronounced ‘triple eye eff’) is the acronym for the International Image Interoperability Framework. This framework comes from a broad community of primarily cultural heritage organizations that are working together to come to practical consensus around the publishing of digital images.”

Google Blog: Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?

Google Blog: Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?. “While some are drawn to the strong brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, others prefer gazing at the gilded glory of Klimt’s The Kiss, but one thing is certain: people love art. In fact, each month, there are more than 500 million art-related searches on Google. Now whether you’re a casual fan or a true culture vulture, Google can help you become an art expert. Starting today, when you search for art-related things, you’ll have access to more relevant results and the ability to dive deeper into topics of interest. We’ve also added a new feature in Street View (think digital museum guide!) that gives you key insights about the artworks on your virtual museum visits.”

V&A Director: We’ve been doing digital art all wrong (The Memo)

The Memo: V&A Director: We’ve been doing digital art all wrong. “For years galleries and museums have been racing to scan, photograph and digitise their collections, in order to open up their collections for a global audience. But is this really a good idea? Former MP and now director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, Tristram Hunt, this weekend spoke out against the current fetish of digitising art which he says has taken over the art world.”

ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost

ECNS: China’s famous Terracotta Army gets digital boost. “China’s world famous Terracotta Army attraction has been given a digital boost thanks to the Chinese web-based encyclopedia Baidu Baike, in partnership with the Emperor Qinshihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum. Together they’ve created a large-scale, high definition ‘digital museum’ for the country’s UNESCO World Heritage site, reports China News Service.”

Phys.org: Terahertz spectroscopy—the new tool to detect art fraud

Phys.org: Terahertz spectroscopy—the new tool to detect art fraud. “When we look at a painting, how do we know it’s a genuine piece of art? Everything we see with the unaided eye in a painting – from the Australian outback images of Albert Namatjira or Russell Drysdale, to the vibrant works of Pro Hart – is thanks to the mix of colours that form part of the visible spectrum. But if we look at the painting in a different way, at a part of the spectrum that is invisible to our eyes, then we can see something very different. As our recently published research shows, it could even help us detect art fraud.”

ArtNews: The Archives of American Art Launches Feature-Filled Online Research Guide to Chicago

ArtNews: The Archives of American Art Launches Feature-Filled Online Research Guide to Chicago. “For those interested in American art history, there is arguably no site on the internet quite as juicy as the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art. Want to look through a Charles Sheeler notebook and try out his recipe for shoofly pie? The AAA has got you covered…. And now I have some thrilling news: the AAA just got a great deal juicier, with the addition of a new mini-site aimed at facilitating research into Chicago art history.”