Library of Congress: Newly Digitized Veterans History Project Collection Showcasing Veteran Artists

Library of Congress: Newly Digitized Veterans History Project Collection Showcasing Veteran Artists. “Researchers, veterans and their families now have access to ‘Veterans and the Arts,’ an online ‘Experiencing War’ website feature highlighting the stories of veterans who pursued the arts during their post-military lives. This new feature includes nine digitized collections from the Veterans History Project (VHP) archive, each of which holds the first-person narrative of a veteran who used artistic endeavors – such as music, creative writing, sculpture, ceramic arts and even the culinary arts –to assist in the transition to civilian life after serving.”

Washington Secretary of State: Giving New Voice To Thomas Handforth, A Northwest Artist With Global Perspective

Washington Secretary of State: Giving New Voice To Thomas Handforth, A Northwest Artist With Global Perspective. “Best known for his children’s book Mei Li, which won the 1939 Caldecott Medal for illustration, Handforth was born in Tacoma, and studied art at the University of Washington…. In 1982, TPL’s Northwest Room received the Handforth Collection from the Handforth family. More than 70 years following the artist’s death, this collection of Handforth’s unpublished work has finally entered the public domain. Through the Washington Digital Heritage grant, TPL digitized over 300 of Handforth’s drawings, prints, letters, and paintings.”

Japan Times: Art gets a second life via digitized showcasing

Japan Times: Art gets a second life via digitized showcasing. “NTT East Corp. has launched a project to preserve Japan’s cultural properties in an effort to conserve assets susceptible to damage from natural disasters or deterioration over time. Under the project, the telecommunication firm plans to digitalize cultural properties, such as paintings, architecture and historical documents, and store the data on the firm’s server.”

New York Times: Google Digitizes Artworks in Puerto Rico for 1st Time

New York Times: Google Digitizes Artworks in Puerto Rico for 1st Time. “‘Goyita’ is one of more than 350 paintings from Puerto Rico that Google Arts & Culture digitized for the first time with help from ‘Hamilton’ creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, who unveiled late Thursday the online exhibition that features work from four Puerto Rico art institutions.”

‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online (The Art Newspaper)

The Art Newspaper: ‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online. “Around 9,000 catalogues from more than 390 auction houses in Germany, Austria and Switzerland dating from 1901 to 1945 are now available online, a new resource that art-market historians and provenance researchers seeking to trace and identify Nazi-looted art say is invaluable to their work.”

DigitalArts: TikTok and how to use it for illustration success

DigitalArts: TikTok and how to use it for illustration success. “With Instagram doing its best to throttle visibility, more and more digital artists wanting to jump ship to another platform find themselves at a loose end. Twitter was an increasingly popular choice, until the little blue bird began to heavily compress images, whilst Facebook continues its steady decline into a graveyard for artistic exposure. A surprising option though comes in the form of an app best known for music and skits, closer to the dearly departed Vine rather than something like ArtStation. We’re of course talking about much-talked about app of the moment TikTok; less talked about though is how some illustrators are finding a fanbase on the platform through an interesting symbiosis of sound and vision.”

The rise of made-for-Instagram exhibits: How social media is shaping art and the way you experience it (Forge Today)

Forge Today: The rise of made-for-Instagram exhibits: How social media is shaping art and the way you experience it. “The desire for content has contributed to the recent success of ‘experiences’ within the industry, where exhibitions are judged for their ‘Instagramability’ and how well they photograph. The general rule appears to be the more aesthetic or interesting the exhibition, the more traction it receives, with the worldwide success of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms (there are currently 838k photos with the tag #yayoikusama on Instagram) or the Guggenheim’s America (a golden toilet recently stolen from Blenheim Palace after 100,000 people waited to use it) often used as prime examples.”