BBC: Facebook rejects Montreal museum’s ad over Picasso nude

BBC: Facebook rejects Montreal museum’s ad over Picasso nude. “The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts online ad for its big summer exhibit was blocked because it showed abstract breasts painted by the modern master. The museum eventually had to reach out directly to Facebook in order to get the posts authorised.”

Hyperallergic: A New Online Project Rethinks How We Learn About Artists and Archive Their Life and Work

New-to-me, from Hyperallergic: A New Online Project Rethinks How We Learn About Artists and Archive Their Life and Work. “In 2015, [Glenn] Wharton joined his colleague Deena Engel at New York University to establish the Artist Archives Initiative, a forum to promote the research and dissemination of knowledge about the display and care of contemporary art. The initiative is also strategic, responding to the art world’s growing need for a thorough network of documents and research to aid future exhibitions and the reengagement of interest in previously forgotten artists.”

Mashable: Belgian museums are uniting in protest against Facebook over artistic nudity ban

Mashable: Belgian museums are uniting in protest against Facebook over artistic nudity ban. “Belgian museums are banding together to take on Facebook over the social media giant’s rules on nudity, specifically of the artistic variety. The Flemish Tourist Board is trying to convince Facebook to change its rules over how it treats artistic nudity from Flemish Masters such as Peter Paul Rubens. The tourist board, Visit Flanders, points out that its Facebook postings with images containing artistic nudity are often removed by the company when they try to promote them.”

Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors. “Rubens nudes have entranced those visiting the world’s great art galleries for some 400 years. Contemporaries on whom the Flemish master is said to have had a profound impact include Van Dyck and Rembrandt … but none of this has passed muster with Facebook’s censors.”

INTERPOL: Enhancing The Fight Against The Illicit Traffic Of Cultural Property

INTERPOL: Enhancing The Fight Against The Illicit Traffic Of Cultural Property. “With crimes against cultural heritage often linked to serious transnational crime, only a fraction of such offences are reported to national and international law enforcement. INTERPOL’s Stolen Works of Art database has been addressing this traditional underreporting since 1995, and today, has taken a step which will lead to enhanced information exchange. In cooperation with the Italian Carabinieri’s Headquarters for the Protection of Cultural Heritage, INTERPOL has launched an enhanced version of its Stolen Works of Art database, called P.SY.C.HE. (Protection System for Cultural Heritage).”

The Verge: The key to creating gorgeous, glitchy YouTube images: anticipation and deletion

The Verge: The key to creating gorgeous, glitchy YouTube images: anticipation and deletion. “When I was younger, I had a soccer coach who stressed the importance of anticipation. ‘An-tiiii-ciiiiiii-PAY-shun,’ he’d yell at us, while we were diving around for the ball. If we did it right, he promised, we’d be able to do in soccer what Neo does in The Matrix — not, like, stop bullets, but be in the right place at the right time to stop an attack on our goal. I wasn’t too great at it, at least not at first. But the lesson stuck. I can hear coach’s voice even now, when I navigate the crush of travelers during New York City’s all-too-frequent rush hours. This is all to say that prediction is key; it’s the difference between getting the ball in the back of the net and whiffing entirely, the gap between getting a seat on a crowded train or having to wait, chastened, for the next one. And, as I recently learned, prediction is the difference between a YouTube video and glitch art.”

Artstor Blog: More than 1 million images now publicly available at library. artstor. org!

Artstor Blog: More than 1 million images now publicly available at library.artstor.org!. “Good news! Artstor has made more than 1 million image, video, document, and audio files from public institutional collections freely available to everyone—subscribers and non-subscribers alike–at library.artstor.org. These collections are being shared by institutions who make their content available via JSTOR Forum, a tool that allows them to catalog, manage, and share digital media collections and make them discoverable to the widest possible audience. These eclectic collections fall into a multitude of categories, including special collections, faculty research and fieldwork, and museum and gallery collections.”