Daily Beast: Louvre Calls in Lawyers Over Pornhub’s Hardcore Re-Enactments

Daily Beast: Louvre Calls in Lawyers Over Pornhub’s Hardcore Re-Enactments. “There is little doubt that the clever app will bring these masterpieces to a whole new audience by marrying two worlds that might not generally engage, but European museum directors aren’t so sure they want their precious masterpieces to be exploited as such, especially when they can charge more noble entities thousands to license the artwork. Both the Louvre and Uffizi say they are suing Pornhub for rights infringements, demanding them to remove reproductions of the works that are displayed in the flesh in their museums.”

Geekologie: PornHub Has Launched A Museum Guide For Classical Nudes

Geekologie: PornHub Has Launched A Museum Guide For Classical Nudes. “The guide covers thirty famous works across six major institutions including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Prado in Madrid, the Uffizi in Florence, and the Louvre and Musee d’Orsay in Paris. It features audio tours, articles, and annotated maps, as well as some NSFW ‘recreations’ of some of the pieces, though those were just hit with a cease and desist by the Louvre and may or may not still be up by the time you’re reading this.” I did see one of these, though the nudity in the thumbnail consisted of someone’s bottom and not some place more private. (I didn’t click to see any further.) The commentary on the pieces is… breezy … and might trip a content filter if the images don’t.

National Gallery of Art: Conservation and Science Journal “Facture” Reveals Discoveries in Modern and Contemporary Art Collection

National Gallery of Art: Conservation and Science Journal “Facture” Reveals Discoveries in Modern and Contemporary Art Collection. “The latest issue of the National Gallery of Art’s biennial journal Facture introduces new and essential voices to the technical understanding and collaborative efforts instrumental to the creation and preservation of modern and contemporary art. Volume five features seven essays that offer expertise from National Gallery conservators, scientists, and curators, as well as outside scholars studying the museum’s collection.”

Notre Dame News: Notre Dame launches platform for online access to library, museum holdings

Notre Dame News: Notre Dame launches platform for online access to library, museum holdings. “The Hesburgh Libraries and the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame have launched Marble (Museum, Archives, Rare Books and Libraries Exploration) — an online teaching and research platform designed to make distinctive cultural heritage collections from across the University accessible through a single portal…. Faculty, students and the general public can browse Marble and download select digitized materials from the Snite Museum of Art, Rare Books & Special Collections and the University Archives in a single platform — including books, manuscripts, sculptures, paintings, photographs, ephemera and more. Each item displays one or more images with descriptive information and linked metadata to view related or similar items.”

PR Newswire: First Artworks Selected for Dubai Collection (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: First Artworks Selected for Dubai Collection (PRESS RELEASE). “Held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, Dubai Collection is a community-led and collaborative scheme allowing patrons to lend their works while retaining legal ownership, in addition to benefitting from expert advice to support the growth of both personal and public collections.”

Getty: Innovation in Prints and Drawings Is the Focus of New Getty Grants

Getty: Innovation in Prints and Drawings Is the Focus of New Getty Grants. “Prints and drawings are an unsung area of curatorial innovation and a place for museums to bring new forms of storytelling to their permanent collections. Nineteen new grants totaling over $1.55 million will support exhibitions, publications and digital projects that center the graphic arts as part of the Getty Foundation’s ongoing Paper Project initiative. Launched in 2018, The Paper Project funds professional development and experimental projects for curators around the world who study prints and drawings to make graphic arts collections more accessible and relevant to 21st-century audiences.”

My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige

My Modern Met: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Edo-Era Master Hiroshige . “The Minneapolis Institute of Art recently made their extensive digital collection of woodblock prints by Hiroshige available to view and even download via their website. Within this 1,000+ image archive are examples of his landscapes, cityscapes, portraits, and more—many of which influenced Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters like Monet and Van Gogh.”

The Art Newspaper: Security guards become guest curators at the Baltimore Museum of Art

The Art Newspaper: Security guards become guest curators at the Baltimore Museum of Art. “Museum security officers, the people who probably spend the most time looking at art, will soon be organising an exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) as guest curators. The show Guarding the Art, due to open in March 2022, will bring together a selection of works that resonate with each of the 17 participating officers, and offer ‘different perspectives from within the museum hierarchy’, says the curator and art historian Lowery Stokes Sims, who helped develop the project.”

Museums Association: Trustees approve return of Benin bronzes held in Berlin museums

Museums Association: Trustees approve return of Benin bronzes held in Berlin museums. “Trustees of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, the federal government body that oversees the city’s state museums, authorised its director Hermann Panzinger to “negotiate the return of objects from the collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin as part of the joint negotiations between the Federal Republic of Germany and the competent authorities in Nigeria.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting

Ars Technica: Archaeologists recreated three common kinds of Paleolithic cave lighting. “Lighting sources could indeed hold vital clues to the different ways prehistoric peoples used caves, according to a new paper by a team of Spanish scientists, published in the journal PLOS ONE. They conducted in situ experiments with three different kinds of Paleolithic lighting sources in the hopes of shedding some light (pun intended) on what those various illumination methods might tell us about the emergence of ‘human symbolic and artistic behavior’ in the form of cave art.”

Artnet News: A Painting Fell Off the Wall and Went in for Conservation. Turns Out It’s a Long-Lost Rembrandt Worth Up to $240 Million

Artnet News: A Painting Fell Off the Wall and Went in for Conservation. Turns Out It’s a Long-Lost Rembrandt Worth Up to $240 Million. “The painting, The Adoration of the Magi, is believed to date from 1632 to 1633. Scholars had long believed that only copies of the picture had survived, including well-known examples in Gothenburg, Sweden, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The work had long been in the collection of a family that had no idea it was a genuine Rembrandt, until 2016, when art restorer Antonella di Francesco took it in for repairs after it fell off a wall.”

BBC: AI helps restore Rembrandt’s Night Watch masterpiece

BBC: AI helps restore Rembrandt’s Night Watch masterpiece. “For the first time in more than 300 years, Rembrandt’s masterpiece The Night Watch can again be seen in its entirety in the Netherlands. Created in 1642 by the Dutch master, the huge picture was trimmed on all four sides in 1715 to fit between two doors in Amsterdam town hall. The city’s Rijksmuseum has now added the missing scenes from a small, early copy of the original. It used artificial intelligence (AI) to mimic Rembrandt’s style.”

BBC: Valuable 350-year-old oil paintings found in skip

BBC: Valuable 350-year-old oil paintings found in skip. “German police have issued an appeal for information after two valuable 17th Century paintings were discovered dumped in a road-side skip. The oil paintings are believed to be by Dutch artist Samuel van Hoogstraten and Italian Pietro Bellotti, police said. A man found the paintings at a motorway service station on the A7 south of Würzburg in Bavaria last month.”