Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever

Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever. “Rather than build the Statue of Liberty in such a way that its 200,000-lb copper shell stood upright on its own, Gustave Eiffel — the man behind the eponymous tower — designed it around a massive inner framework. You might have already known this, but it’s the kind of detail that doesn’t often spring to mind unless you’re 1) a French/American history buff or 2) someone who has already been inside the thing. Thankfully, to coincide with the opening of the official Statue of Liberty museum this week, there’s a new AR-focused iOS app to give visitors and the far-flung curious an up-close look at France’s majestic gift to the US.”

The Next Web: How to use AI to redefine the way we create art

The Next Web: How to use AI to redefine the way we create art. “Historically, artists have been defined by the tools available to make their work – sculptors, painters, and music instrumentalists. Rama Allen, executive creative director of London-headquartered studio The Mill, is looking to turn that idea on its head, by using AI to create art in tandem with humans.”

Artforum: Leonard A. Lauder Research Center For Modern Art Launches Digital Archives

Artforum: Leonard A. Lauder Research Center For Modern Art Launches Digital Archives. “The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art has established a new initiative to make inaccessible or rare documents available online. The project, created in collaboration with the Met’s digital department, seeks to advance scholarship through digital access to primary-source materials.”

BBC: Could a computer ever create better art than a human?

BBC: Could a computer ever create better art than a human?. “Last year a portrait of Edmond Belamy sold for $432,000 (£337,000). A bit steep, you might think, for a picture of someone you’ve never heard of. And you won’t have heard of the artist either, as the picture was created by an algorithm drawing on a data set of 15,000 portraits painted between the 14th and 20th Centuries. And to be honest, it’s a bit rubbish.”

Science|Business: Two different phases of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Landscape” discovered thanks to a UniBo team

Science|Business: Two different phases of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Landscape” discovered thanks to a UniBo team. “One of the best-known drawings by Leonardo da Vinci, the ‘Landscape’, is the result of two different phases, as the artist appears to have added some details at a later stage. The discovery was possible thanks to a new high-resolution digital scan performed by a team of researchers of the Department of Architecture of the University of Bologna.”

ArtNews: Whitney Museum Launches Online Platform for Past Biennials

ArtNews: Whitney Museum Launches Online Platform for Past Biennials. “The Whitney Biennial began in 1932, when the show was split into two exhibitions—one for painting, the other for mediums including sculpture, watercolors, prints, and drawings. In 1937 the exhibition shifted to an annual timeline instead of every two years, and then it changed back in 1973.”