Radio Praha: National Gallery’s App Reveals Hidden Medieval Secrets

Radio Praha: National Gallery’s App Reveals Hidden Medieval Secrets. “The National Gallery in Prague has launched its first mobile application, called Hidden Secrets of Medieval Paintings. It offers visitors an interactive viewing of selected panel paintings, which are on display in the Convent of St. Agnes of Bohemia, and uncovers some interesting facts about their origin as well as some secrets hidden under the top layer.”

24700: Time Traveling Through CalArts’s Poster Archive With Michael Worthington

24700: Time Traveling Through CalArts’s Poster Archive With Michael Worthington. “In 1994, Graphic Design faculty members Shelley Stepp and Kary Arimoto-Mercer created a physical archive for the posters as a way to preserve students’ work. From their initial efforts, the physical archive has grown exponentially, requiring that the posters be stored in various corners of offices across the Graphic Design program. Without a central location or means to access the physical poster archive, Graphic Design faculty Michael Worthington devised a plan to consolidate the work into a digital space, a platform that could be made available online to alumni and current students, as well as to CalArts and design communities at large.”

Wired: The high-stakes race to stop the trafficking of priceless artefacts

Wired: The high-stakes race to stop the trafficking of priceless artefacts. “In December 2016, David Hidalgo received a photograph of a 17th-century Peruvian painting. The unsigned artwork, of the Virgen de Guadalupe, depicts the Virgin Mary surrounded by apparitions and tells the story of her appearance to Saint Juan Diego near Mexico City in 1531. Hidalgo’s tip-off came via email from a source who had seen the painting on show at the Bowers Museum in California, where it was on loan. Hidalgo’s source suspected that the painting had been stolen.”

Hyperallergic: Newly Digitized Collection of Early 20th-Century Lakota Drawings Tells a Curious History

Hyperallergic: Newly Digitized Collection of Early 20th-Century Lakota Drawings Tells a Curious History. “In 1922, the Newberry Library acquired this collection of 160 drawings, attributed to ‘Sioux Indians’ living in Fort Yates, which serves as headquarters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The three boxes of art were sold by one Aaron McGaffey Beede, an Episcopal missionary who had provided paper and art supplies to the residents he had come to know, and paid them small sums to purchase the resulting works. This strange exchange arose from a dire situation: in the winter of 1913-14, the Lakota faced starvation from failed crops and a mysterious disappearance of cattle. These drawings, for them, carried exceptional value linked to survival; today, they represent significant records of indigenous self-representation as well as cross-cultural exchange.”

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results. “Art lovers will now be able to learn about one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art in history after a team of researchers on Wednesday launched a website with their findings about the art collection of legendary German-Jewish publisher Rudolf Mosse….German institutions are working with the descendents of former Nazi victims through the project. The Mosse collection – with its thousands of paintings, sculptures, objects, books and antiquities – is one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art.”

Curbed Detroit: Detroiter creates resource to document murals across the city

Curbed Detroit: Detroiter creates resource to document murals across the city. “Driving around Detroit, it’s hard not to notice mural after mural gracing the sides of buildings. There are so many, it can be hard to know where to turn to find out who painted them and how to find more information. One Detroiter, Viranel Clerard, is determined to document all of the murals in Detroit. His website, the Detroit Mural Project, currently has 500, and he has another 500 already photographed and queued to go up on the site.”

New York Times: The Personal Data of 346,000 People, Hung on a Museum Wall

New York Times: The Personal Data of 346,000 People, Hung on a Museum Wall. “Deng Yufeng wanted to create art that prods people to question their lack of data privacy. What better way, he reasoned, than to buy the personal information of more than 300,000 Chinese people off the internet and display it in a public exhibition? The police did not appreciate the irony.”