Artnet: Leonardo da Vinci Hid Invisible Drawings in His Sketches. Now High-Tech Scanners Have Brought Them to Light

Artnet: Leonardo da Vinci Hid Invisible Drawings in His Sketches. Now High-Tech Scanners Have Brought Them to Light. “Most striking of all are two blank sheets of paper that are now known to hold invisible studies for hands. High-energy X-ray fluorescence has revealed the sketches called Studies of hands for the Adoration of the Magi. The technology also clarifies how these incredible drawings managed to vanish in plain sight over the centuries. Because of the high content of copper in da Vinci’s metal stylus, a chemical reaction transformed the lines into transparent copper salt.”

Creating Access beyond metmuseum.org: The Met Collection on Wikipedia (Met Museum)

Met Museum: Creating Access beyond metmuseum.org: The Met Collection on Wikipedia. “Spanning 5,000 years of human history, the Museum’s comprehensive collection is relevant to audiences across the globe. There is an artwork in the collection that could inspire any one of the 3.9 billion internet-connected people in the world. Our goal is to reduce the distance between each of those people and the artwork that would inspire them, and Open Access is one of the major tactics to move us closer to that goal. With the initiative now one year young, it is interesting to take a moment to note the impact it has had.”

K-9 Artifact Finders Program: Training Dogs To Stop The Illicit Trade Of Antiquities (Antiquities)

Antiquities: K-9 Artifact Finders Program: Training Dogs To Stop The Illicit Trade Of Antiquities. “Dogs have been part of the archaeological record since ancient times. Now, thanks to the K-9 Artifact Finders Program, dogs will have the opportunity to play a role in protecting that record. It is commonplace to see trained dogs in tandem with law enforcement officers working to keep airports safe, find missing persons, or track down illicit substances. However, if this new and unprecedented program, run by researchers at Red Arch Cultural Heritage Law and Policy Research, in partnership with Penn Vet Working Dog Center, is successful, trained dogs will also be able to sniff out looted and illicitly traded artifacts.”

Phys .org: Facebook denies censorship in closing of Paris user’s page

Phys .org: Facebook denies censorship in closing of Paris user’s page. “Lawyers for Facebook Inc. denied the company engaged in censorship when it shut down the account of a French user after he posted a photograph of a famous 19th century painting of a naked woman’s genitals and lower torso. Frederic Durand-Baissas, 59, a primary school teacher in Paris, has sued the powerful social network in French court, claiming Facebook violated his freedom of speech in 2011 by abruptly removing his profile. Durand-Baissas’ account was suspended hours after he posted a photo of Gustave Courbet’s ‘The Origin of the World,’ a painting from 1866 that depicts female genitalia, the teacher has alleged. The case was heard on Thursday.”

Meet your match: Google app finds famous art you look like (CNET)

CNET: Meet your match: Google app finds famous art you look like. “Sure, we all know what famous person we vaguely look like (I always get Geena Davis, which … I wish! She’s still in a ‘League of Her Own.’) But the blandly named Google Arts & Culture app will dig through thousands of museum artworks from days gone by to see if you have a truly old-school doppelganger. It matched me up with numerous paintings, but the app’s top choice was a Renoir. Although I doubt the woman depicted in his painting wore braces.”

Museums Association: V&A unveils digital reproductions declaration

Museums Association: V&A unveils digital reproductions declaration . “The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) has launched a declaration on digital reproductions of artworks and other artefacts. The Reach (Reproduction of Art and Cultural Heritage) Declaration is designed to offer guidance on how cultural institutions produce, store and share digital heritage assets.”