University of North Carolina: William Blake Archive Publishes Digital Edition of Blake’s Early Pencil Drawings

University of North Carolina: William Blake Archive Publishes Digital Edition of Blake’s Early Pencil Drawings. “The William Blake Archive, one of UNC’s flagship public and digital humanities initiatives, recently published a digital edition of Blake’s forty-three pencil drawings made during his early years as an artist, spanning from 1779-1790. The Blake Archive provides access to William Blake’s literary and visual works and is part of a larger effort within the digital humanities to provide more widespread access to his archives through digitization and other projects.”

Times of San Diego: New Website Lets Public View 800-Plus Works in San Diego’s Civic Art Collection

Times of San Diego: New Website Lets Public View 800-Plus Works in San Diego’s Civic Art Collection. “An online catalog of the hundreds of artworks in San Diego’s growing civic art collection is now available to the public online. The city’s Commission for Arts and Culture launched the digital resource to increase the visibility of the collection. The website allows citizens to quickly search and sort images by criteria, such as type, council district and location.”

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries. “‘A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction,’ Virginia Woolf famously said from a college lecture podium in 1928, in what later evolved into a major feminist book. Surely, those two amenities would facilitate the career of many a woman visual artist, too. But even the privileged combination of financial independence and a studio (plus talent, of course) hasn’t been enough to secure many female creatives a place in the pantheon of art history.”

The Getty Iris: A New Digital Tool for Looking at Bruegel

The Getty Iris: A New Digital Tool for Looking at Bruegel. “Much like the web tool Closer to Van Eyck, Inside Bruegel stems from the Getty Foundation’s Panel Paintings Initiative, a decade-long effort to train a new generation of panel paintings conservators. Funding that supported training residencies associated with the structural research and technical study of KHM’s Bruegel paintings also provided an opportunity for further investigation and documentation. The result is a new resource that promises to delight scholars and art lovers alike. Users can zoom into Bruegel’s carefully considered details, and apply imaging filters such as infrared reflectography and X-radiography to see underdrawings, structural modifications, pigments used by the artist, and more.”

Ubergizmo: First AI Portrait Sold By Christie’s For $432,500

Ubergizmo: First AI Portrait Sold By Christie’s For $432,500. “Auction house Christie’s has sold its first AI art piece for a staggering $432,500. This print was actually expected to fetch around $10,000 so it has certainly exceeded the expectations of this 252-year-old auctioneering juggernaut and those who were watching this auction closely. This is also the first time that Christie’s has sold an AI art piece.”

Scaling the Mission: The Met Collection API (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Scaling the Mission: The Met Collection API. “Today, The Metropolitan Museum of Art launches a new public API for the collection. Through The Met Collection API, users can connect to a live feed of all Creative Commons Zero (CC0) data and 406,000 images from the The Met collection, all available for use without copyright or restriction.”

Artnet: The Art Institute of Chicago Is the Latest Museum to Offer Open Access to Thousands of Images in Its Archive

Artnet: The Art Institute of Chicago Is the Latest Museum to Offer Open Access to Thousands of Images in Its Archive. “The Art Institute of Chicago is now offering unrestricted access to thousands of images—44,313 to be exact—from its digital archive. The release is part of the museum’s website redesign and the images have been made available under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license.”