Review Geek: Watch NASA Attack an Innocent Asteroid on Monday

Review Geek: Watch NASA Attack an Innocent Asteroid on Monday. “NASA is set to channel the spirit of the 1998 film Armageddon on Monday. The space agency plans to crash a spacecraft into the asteroid Dimorphos in the first test of a planetary defense system. Dubbed ‘Double Asteroid Redirection Test’ (DART), the program aims to change the celestial body’s orbit.”

Ars Technica: Citizen scientists help discover more than 1,000 new asteroids

Ars Technica: Citizen scientists help discover more than 1,000 new asteroids. “On International Asteroid Day in 2019, a group of research institutions launched a program that could make a deep impact on our knowledge of the diminutive bodies. Using citizen science to train a machine-learning algorithm, the Hubble Asteroid Hunter project identified more than 1,000 new asteroids; the discoveries could help scientists better understand the ring of heavenly bodies that primarily float between Mars and Jupiter.”

California Institute of Technology: NASA’s ‘Eyes on Asteroids’ Reveals Our Near-Earth Object Neighborhood

California Institute of Technology: NASA’s ‘Eyes on Asteroids’ Reveals Our Near-Earth Object Neighborhood. “Through a new 3D real-time visualization tool, you can now explore the asteroids and comets that approach Earth’s orbital neighborhood – and the spacecraft that visit these objects – with a click or a swipe. NASA’s Eyes on Asteroids brings this data to any smartphone, tablet, or computer with an internet connection – no download required.”

Northern Arizona University News: Astronomer recruiting volunteers in effort to quadruple number of known active asteroids

Northern Arizona University News: Astronomer recruiting volunteers in effort to quadruple number of known active asteroids. “The study of active asteroids is a relatively new field of solar system science, focusing on objects that have asteroid-like orbits but look more like comets, with visual characteristics such as tails…. Through funding from a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) award in 2018, doctoral student Colin Orion Chandler in Northern Arizona University’s Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science launched an ambitious new project, Active Asteroids, which is designed to engage volunteers in the search for more of these enigmatic objects.”

CNET: Watch a ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid fly by Earth live on Friday

CNET: Watch a ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid fly by Earth live on Friday. “Asteroids are zipping past Earth all the time, but we’ve got a special one coming up. Asteroid 1998 HL1 will be visible to some amateur telescopes, but you can look to the Virtual Telescope Project to bring it right to your eyeballs with a livestream on Friday starting at 10 a.m. PT.”

Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space Rocks (New York Times)

New York Times: Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space Rocks. “For the last couple of years, Nathan P. Myhrvold, a former chief technologist at Microsoft with a physics doctorate from Princeton, has roiled the small, congenial community of asteroid scientists by saying they know less than they think about these near-Earth objects. He argues that a trove of data from NASA they rely on is flawed and unreliable.”

Smithsonian Launches New Newsletter About Asteroids

The Smithsonian has launched a new newsletter about asteroids. “Almost every day, a known asteroid passes within a few million miles of Earth. On those dates, the Daily Minor Planet will list the flyby asteroid along with the time and distance of its closest approach. On days without a cosmic flyby, the report will feature a newly discovered asteroid. It will also highlight an article from the popular press.”